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Tuesday, January 24

Statebuilding, Peacebuilding & Hybrid Governance in Somalia
Time:
10:00 am
Presenter:
Ken Menkhaus, Professor & Chair, Political Science Dept., Davidson College
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
DRC51@pitt.edu

Somalia, often cast as the world's "most failed state," is starting to pull together a federal government. The challenges are daunting, and the hybrid forms of governance emerging there defy conventional statebuilding. Ken Menkhaus assesses the current conflict and governance trends, the role of corruption, and the changing security environment facing the next Somali administration.

Ken Menkhaus has taught political science as Davidson since 1991. His courses focus on international and comparative politics, as well as the non-profit sector. His regional specialization is on the politics of the Horn of Africa. He is a Senior Research Advisor and Fellow, ENOUGH project; Fellow, Rift Valley Institute Horn of Africa and Director of Studies for its Annual Course in Kenya; Lecturer, and an Editorial board member, Peacebuilding and Journal of Modern African Studies.

Refreshments will be served.

Wednesday, January 25

Racism in the African Diaspora
Parallels Between Racial Issues in America and Apartheid in South Africa
Time:
8:00 pm to 10:00 pm
Location:
Assembly Room, WPU
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with African Students Organization (ASO), Department of History, Department of Africana Studies, Honors College and Black Action Society (BAS)

The aim of this event is to bring together students and staff at the University of Pittsburgh in a panel style discussion about the varies parallels between racism and the civil rights movement in America and Apartheid in South Africa. We want students and faculty to be able to recognize patterns in history in an effort to stop it from repeating itself and be able to see their part in any change that may come in the future regarding racial and social relations in America and worldwide. During the event, we will show a short documentary and short video clips that represent the topic and we will have professors who are experience in each subsequent field talk about parallels while taking input from the audience and answering any questions.

Thursday, January 26

Political Rights, Social Rights, and the Decolonization of Africa
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Frederick Cooper
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History

Frederick Cooper is a Professor of History at NYU. His interests include slavery and labor in the 19th- and 20-th century East Africa, the shifting nature of colonial thinking and practices, and the relationship of social change and conflict to decolonization in French and British Africa. His work seeks to counter both the national and the modern bars of most historical studies through the study of empires.

Tuesday, January 31

Spiritan Engagement with Africa:
1841 to the Present
Time:
4:00 pm
Location:
Africa Room, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Wednesday, February 1

The Changing Spiritan Presence and Contemporary Issues in Africa
Time:
10:00 am
Location:
Union Ballroom, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Implications for Duquesne’s Engagement and Strategic Initiatives with and in Africa
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
Union Ballroom, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Monday, February 6

Hot Metal Empire
Type Design, Media, and Empire in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Tom Mullaney, Stanford University
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History

Beginning at the turn of the twentieth century, hot metal typesetting swept through newspaper plants and government printing offices across the United States and Europe – and soon through Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. With missionary-like zeal reminiscent of the Propaganda Fide, and a hunger for lucrative new markets, the manufacturing giant Mergenthaler Linotype and its European licensees carved up the world of script along already lines of empire, colonialism, and the rising power of the United States. Soon, letterform artists and sales representatives in Brooklyn and London found themselves trafficking in Arabic, Armenian, Burmese, Devanagari, Hebrew, Korean, Mongolian, Siamese, and over one hundred other world scripts — scripts once referred to as “Exotic Type,” but now re-cast in the novel term “Non-Latin.” In this talk, Thomas S. Mullaney charts out the global history of this “Hot Metal Empire,” examining the relationship between non-Latin type design, media, and colonialism in the age of modern empire, industrialized production, New Imperialism, and the aftermath of the First World War.

Thursday, February 9

The Quiet Rise of Heavy Metal in Africa
Let's Talk Africa
Time:
12:30 pm to 2:30 pm
Presenter:
Edward Banchs
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Join the African Studies Program and Edward Banchs, author of Heavy Metal Africa: Life, Passion, and Heavy Metal in the Forgotten Continent for a look at how rock and heavy metal music has become the voice of many in Africa, as well as how identity, culture, and life is being shaped by this music in the 'forgotten' continent.

Edward Banchs holds an MA in African Studies from the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies. His research on rock and metal in Africa has been featured in several publications, including The Guardian, O Globo, This Is Africa, and FactsMag. A lifelong metalhead, he lives in Pittsburgh, PA, where he is planning his next African adventure.

Lunch will be provided!

Thursday, February 16 to Friday, February 17

Career Networking Trip to Washington DC
For Pitt Undergraduates
Time:
7:00 am to 8:30 pm
Location:
Washington, DC
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different careers and gain an insider's perspective on the different organizations. Students will participate in one of the four tracks:
* Global Health and Development
* Diplomacy and Security
* International Development and Education
* Human Rights and Refugees

Along with meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, government agencies there will be a reception to meet center alumni. A total of 44 students will be selected to go (from 4 participating UCIS centers.)

**Students must apply by noon January 20, 2017.**

Monday, February 20

Surrogate Settlers:
Africans as Colonists in the Sixteenth-Century Iberian Atlantic World
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. David Wheat
Location:
3702 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Thursday, February 23 to Sunday, February 26

2017 National Model African Union Conference
Time:
7:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
Howard University
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Howard University in collaboration with the African Union Mission in Washington, D.C. and Member State Embassies sponsors an annual simulation of the African Union, the regional organization of African states, in the form of a Model African Union Conference. Celebrating thirty-seven years of simulation of the OAU and now AU, the 15th Annual National Model African Union Conference is scheduled for February 23-26, 2017.

Friday, February 24

Sharing Food and Words
The African and Africana Research Experience
Time:
2:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Cup n Chaucer, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with University Library System (ULS) and Africana Studies Department

This event will provide a forum for discussion on doing research and writing about Africa and the African Diaspora. It is a great opportunity for students already doing research or wishing to begin doing research on Africa and the African Diaspora to learn about various approaches, and resources available at Pitt. Faculty and student presenters will lead the discussions based on their own research experiences from diverse disciplines and viewpoints. They will focus on the opportunities and challenges of doing research related to Africa and the African Diaspora, while also discussing the importance of diversity in research to allow for traditionally underrepresented groups to become active participants in doing research and getting their work published. The goal is to encourage Africanist faculty and students interested in doing research to engage in conversations that involve different viewpoints, and help them develop a wide range of research methods and skills while also learning about optional resources available to them. The conversations will happen over sharing food from Africa (Ethiopia, Congo and northern Africa).

Monday, February 27

Afro-Latin America:
Black Lives, 1600-2000
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Reid Andrews
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Monday, March 13

Buying Time:
Debt and Mobility in the Western Indian Ocean
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Thomas McDow
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Thursday, March 23

Model African Union
Time:
7:30 am to 4:30 pm
Location:
O'Hara Student Center and the University Club
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Student Participants are sponsored by the ASP
Contact:
Katherine Mooney
Contact Phone:
412-648-1802
Contact Email:
africanstudies@pitt.edu

We are proud to announce the 6th Annual Model African Union for high school students! This unique experiences provides students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to research and represent a given African country's interest in Parliamentary-style proceedings! This event is one of only a handful of high school African Union simulations in the country! Additionally, we provide a light breakfast and African lunch for all students. We also provide African entertainment during lunch. Finally, We do not charge any fees for schools to participate.

With 13 schools and over 165 students having participated last year, this event continues to grow and evolve. Join us!

If you are a teacher and have interested students, or if you are a university student and are interested in volunteering, please email africanstudies@pitt.edu.

Monday, March 27

Afro-Atlantic Discourses in the Age of Revolution
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Michele Reid-Vasquez
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department