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Thursday, March 30

The Holocaust, Modern Genocides and the Anti-Atrocities Movement
Time:
10:30 am to 12:00 pm
Presenter:
John Prendergast
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Ford Institute for Human Security
Contact Phone:
412-648-7434

Genocide has evolved over time since the Holocaust. But the variables going into genocide have remained the same: targeting people on the basis of their identity. The biggest symbol of hope on the horizon regarding efforts to counter genocide is the growing people's movement to stop it from happening. John Prendergast will discuss about how social movements are the force that has changed the course of history in the past in response to terrible atrocities, and will do so again with regard to genocide.
John Prendergast is a human rights activist and New York Times best-selling author who has focused on peace in Africa for over thirty years. He is the Founding Director of the Enough Project, an initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. He is also the Co-Founder of The Sentry, a new investigative initiative focused on dismantling the networks financing conflict and atrocities. John has worked for the Clinton White House, the State Department, two members of Congress, the National Intelligence Council, UNICEF, Human Rights Watch, the International Crisis Group, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. He was featured on a segment of Sixty Minutes, CBS News, on March 19! He has been a Big Brother for over 25 years, as well as a youth counselor and a basketball coach.
Light refreshments will be served.

The Holocaust, Modern Genocides and the Anti-Atrocities Movement
Ford Institute Speaker Series
Time:
10:30 am
Presenter:
Dr. John Prendergast
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Ford Institute for Human Security, Global Studies Center and University Center for International Studies

Genocide has evolved over time since the Holocaust. But the variables going into genocide have remained the same: targeting people on the basis of their identity. The biggest symbol of hope on the horizon regarding efforts to counter genocide is the growing people's movement to stop it from happening. Prendergast will discuss about how social movements are the force that has changed the course of history in the past in response to terrible atrocities, and will do so again with regard to genocide.

John Prendergast is a human rights activist and New York Times best-selling author who has focused on peace in Africa for over thirty years. He is the Founding Director of the Enough Project, an initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. He is also the Co-Founder of The Sentry, a new investigative initiative focused on dismantling the networks financing conflict and atrocities. John has worked for the Clinton White House, the State Department, two members of Congress, the National Intelligence Council, UNICEF, Human Rights Watch, the International Crisis Group, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. He was featured on a segment of Sixty Minutes, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fighting-south-sudan-famine/, CBS News, on March 19! He has been a Big Brother for over 25 years, as well as a youth counselor and a basketball coach.
Light refreshments will be served.
Ford Institute Speaker Series
www.fordinstitute.pitt.edu or 412-648-7434
Co-sponsored by University Center for International Studies: African Studies Program & Global Studies Center

Balancing the Wheel: Expectations of Graduates in Kenya
Time:
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Presenter:
Kelvin Ogelo
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Join ASP and our Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant, Kelvin Ogelo, as Kelvin shares on the dynamics of juggling between the social and personal expectations of a young graduate. The setting of his talk is in rural Kenya, and his focus is on a college graduates from less privileged backgrounds.

Friday, March 31

Historicizing Boko Haram's Rage Against Modernity and Munafunci
Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Moses Ochonu
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Africana Studies Department, Department of History, World History Center and Global Studies Center

In this talk, Dr. Moses Ochonu, Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, will historicize the political, theological, and economic events and anxieties that produced the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria. He will deploy, as a structuring analytical device, the theological and polemical construct of munafunci (or hypocrisy). Munafunci is a recurring trope in the rhetorical claims of Muslim reformers and other critics of political and religious orthodoxies in Northern Nigeria. He will use this grid of munafunci to interrogate the reformist impulses that have animated theological and political contests in Northern Nigerian society, contestations for space and power that prefigured the rise of Boko Haram.

This lecture presentation is part of the Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series organized by ASP Affiliated faculty actively engaged in Africa research.

Monday, April 3

Swahili Day
Time:
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Location:
Kurtzman Room, WPU
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Join ASP, the Swahili Student Association (SSA), and the Less Commonly Taught Languages Center for a celebration of the vibrant Swahili language and culture! Free food will be served, and you will have a chance to engage with an African language that is spoken by millions of East and Central Africans in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, as well as in Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Comoro Islands, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, and Northern Zambia. Swahili is the official national language of Kenya and Tanzania and is one of the working languages of the African Union. The number of Swahili speakers in Africa increases yearly because of its everyday use in media, commerce, education, and as a regional lingua franca. Swahili cultural heritage is intrinsically connected to African Studies, Africana Studies, and the study of other cultures of African origin in other places in the world. So learning a widely-spoken African language, like Swahili, is essential to being an informed, globalized citizen.

The Swahili Student Association (SSA) is an organization about learning more about East African cultures or polishing their Swahili skills. SSA exposes members and guests to the practices of Swahili culture through conferences, events, places, and interaction; which will allows students to practice their Swahili and to share their knowledge with other Pitt students. Other activities of SSA include presentations, fun events, and discussions about modern Swahili culture and the many countries that speak Swahili. Meetings take place once every other week on Wednesday nights at 9pm and is open to all students, faculty, and guests. The activities of SSA primarily include teaching and reviewing Swahili in fun and engaging ways. Members are encouraged to continue their study of Swahili through the Less Commonly Taught Languages Center (LCTL).

To learn more about the Swahili Club or become an active member, contact SSA at swahiliassociation@gmail.com.

Saturday, April 8

"Between Fences" International Film Screening
Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Regent Square Theatre
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Carnegie Mellon University, J Street Pittsburgh and CMU’s Center for African-American Urban Studies & the Economy (CAUSE)

Please join African Studies and CMU's International Film Festival for a timely screening of "Between Fences," which tells the story of refugees (mainly from the Sudan and Eritrea) seeking asylum in Israel. Director Avi Mograbi and Chen Alon meet African asylum seekers in the Holot detention facility in the middle of the Negev Desert where they are confined by the state of Israel. Together with the African asylum seekers, they question the status of refugees in Israel using “Theatre of the Oppressed” techniques. What leads men and women to leave everything behind to go towards the unknown? Why does Israel, land of refugees, refuse to take into consideration the situations of the exiled? Through the power of theater and its proximity to film, Between Fences explores these questions in order to portray the true stories of migrants with no legal status seeking safety in a country refusing to accept them. Though based in Israel, the story of men, women and children fleeing their homes for safety in other lands is a common one shared by many people around the world today-- in the U.S and in Europe.

Distinguished Israeli filmmaker, Avi Mograbi began his career as a director in 1989. In 1999 he began teaching documentary and experimental film at Tel Aviv University and the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. He is an activist as well as an artist, known for his commitment to cultural, political, and social justice in the Middle East, and is actively involved in "Breaking the Silence“, an organization dedicated to collecting the testimonies of Israeli soldiers who served in the occupied Palestinian territories.

This event will be held at the Regent Square theater and will have appetizers and a post-film talkback.

Please contact Katherine Mooney at kwm18@pitt.edu for more information or https://www.cmu.edu/faces/betweenfences.html.

Thursday, April 20 to Saturday, April 22

Embodiment and Relationality in Religions of Africa and its Diasporas
Time:
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Stephanie Mitchem, Dr. Rudolph Ware, Dr. Jacob Olupona
Location:
TBD
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Embodiment and Relationality in Religions of Africa and its Diasporas
April 20 -22, 2017

A Symposium co-organized by: Yolanda Covington-Ward (Dept. of Africana Studies) and Jeanette Jouili (Dept. of Religious Studies)

What role does embodiment play in the making of religious selves, communities, and others, for those in Africa and its diasporas? How are embodied religious practices immersed in broader concerns of inter-relational ethics and social transformative struggles for power? Embodiment and Relationality in Religions of Africa and its Diasporas is a symposium that seeks to answer these questions and more while bringing diverse religious traditions, from Pentecostalism to Islam, to the worship of Òrìsàs, and various regions of the Pan-African world, from the African continent, to Europe, to Latin America and the Caribbean, into conversation with one another. A small group of selected scholars from across the country will meet to present papers related to the symposium theme. A different keynote lecture will also be given on each day of the symposium to highlight multiple dimensions of embodiment and relationality. These keynote lectures are free and open to the public.

April 20, 2017: Stephanie Mitchem, Professor of African American Studies, University of South Carolina, Author of African American Folk Healing (NYU Press)

April 21, 2017: Rudolph Ware, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Author The Walking Qu'ran: Islamic Education, Embodied Knowledge, and History in West Africa (UNC Press).

April 22, 2017: Jacob Olupona, Professor of African Religious Traditions and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University, Author of Òrìsà Devotion as World Religion: The Globalization of Yorùbá Religious Culture (University of Wisconsin Press), City of 201 Gods: Ilé-Ifè in Time, Space, and the Imagination (University of California Press), and African Immigrant Religions in America (NYU Press), among others.

Friday, April 28

UCIS Graduation Ceremony
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom A, University Club
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center