Events


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Friday, September 15

REES Opening Reception
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
William Pitt Union Dining Room A
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Friday, September 22

Modern History and the Reign of Questions
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Holly Case, Associate Professor of History, Brown University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The nineteenth century saw the explosion of questions: the Eastern, social, Jewish, Polish, worker and many other questions were hotly discussed in representative bodies, at treaty negotiations, and above all in the daily press. Over the course of the next century, these would be conglomerated into still bigger ones—the European, nationality, social, and agrarian questions—even as they fractured into countless smaller ones, like the Macedonian and Schleswig-Holstein questions, and made their way into various fields of human endeavor (there was cotton, oyster, and even a sugar question). What brought about the “age of questions,” and what does its trajectory reveal about Eastern Europe in the twentieth-century world?

Holly Case is a historian of modern Europe whose work focuses on the relationship between foreign policy, social policy, science, and literature in the European state system of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her first book, Between States: The Transylvanian Question and the European Idea during WWII, was published in May 2009. The book shows how the struggle for mastery among Europe’s Great Powers was affected by the perspectives of small states. Her lecture at the University of Pittsburgh is based on her current brook project that deals with the history of the “Age of Questions.” Case has written on European history, literature, politics and ideas for various magazines and newspapers, including The Guardian, The Chronicle Review, The Nation, Dissent, The Times Literary Supplement, and Boston Review, and is a regular columnist for 3 Quarks Daily.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Saturday, September 23

Teaching Foreign Language Across the Curriculum
Time:
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Rob Anderson, LAC Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Eliana Callahan, Educational Engagement Coordinator
Contact Phone:
624-3503
Contact Email:
elianacallahan@pitt.edu

Teaching foreign language across the curriculum is a means to internationalize courses commonly taught only in English. Students develop an enriched understanding of their chosen course of study while enhancing language skills in their second language. Educators bring world languages into areas of study beyond the typical foreign language and literature classes. This prepares educators and students for the cross-cultural and multilingual demands of global society.

Join UCIS for a one-day workshop for graduate students and faculty interested in teaching FLAC. Dr. Rob Anderson, LAC Coordinator from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will direct the workshop. A continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

There is no cost to attend the event, but pre-registration is required. Pre-register at http://flacworkshop.eventbrite.com/?s=77926837

Monday, September 25

The Russian-speaking Population in Post-Soviet Space: National Security and Minority Rights After Crimea
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Kristina Kallas, Director, University of Tartu Narva College, Estonia
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center; Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies; Ford Institute for Human Security
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In the post-Crimea international arena, the Russian-speaking populations outside of the Russian Federation have once again become a central focus of journalistic enquiries and political analysis. Loyalties and identities of Russophones in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, where they are numerically the largest, and in Latvia and Estonia, where they make proportionally large share of the population, are under scrutiny. The lecture will focus on the conflictual interplay of regional security and stability strategies, Russia’s nation-building efforts and the questions of Russophone minority protection in post-Soviet space 25 years after the dissolution of USSR.

Kristina Kallas is the Director of Narva College at the University of Tartu. Her research and teaching focuses on nationalism studies, minority and fundamental rights, integration processes in multicultural societies, integration and migration policies, refugees and asylum seekers. Since 2015, she also heads the Supervisory Board of the Estonian Integration Foundation. Previously, she has been Senior Analyst at the Institute of Baltic Studies and Member of the Board for the Estonian Refugee Council.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Friday, September 29 to Sunday, October 1

Film Festival: Balkan and Central Asian Women Filmmakers
Time:
4:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Location:
See below
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center along with Cultural Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, Film Studies Program, Gender, Sexuality, and Women Studies Program, Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia, Humanities Center, Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures and Ohio State University
Contact:
Ljiljana Duraskovic
Contact Phone:
(412) 624-5906
Contact Email:
ljiljana@pitt.edu

Three decades after the fall of the socialist system in the Balkans and Eurasia, a wave of women filmmakers appeared as a moving force within national cinemas. With their particular standpoint on the socialist past and the developing capitalist present, female filmmakers have raised questions about previously omitted phenomena such as women at war, the aftermaths of national conflicts, and the fast changing category of womanhood across southeastern Europe and Eurasia. By bringing the works of culturally diverse women filmmakers to one festival and including them into academic discussions, this festival will open up new perspectives on the ways women coped with ideological breaks, complex pasts, and the uncertainties of the present in their everyday life.

Friday, September 29

4:00 pm, Frick Fine Arts 125: Opening remarks, Keynote speaker, Yana Hashamova, Chair, Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Ohio State University

5:00 pm- 7.30 pm, Frick Fine Arts 125: Film screening, Svetla Tsotsorkov’s Thirst (Zhazhda, Bulgaria, 2016)
Post-screening discussion with Ingeborg Bratoeva-Daraktchieva, Film Critic, Bulgaria

7:30 pm: Opening reception

Saturday, September 30

10:00 am -1.00 pm, Frick Fine Arts 125: Film screening, Ines Tanovic’s Our Everyday Life (Naša svakodnevnica, Bosnia, 2015)
Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker

3:00-6.00 pm, Cathedral of Learning, room 232: Film screening, Zhanna Issabayeva’s Nagima (Kazakhstan, 2013)
Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker

Sunday, October 1

10:00 am-1.00 pm, CL 232: Film screening, Ruxandra Zenide, Ryna (Romania, 2006)
Post-screening discussion with Sunnie Rucker-Chang, Assistant Professor of Slavic, Director of European Studies, Ohio State University

1:00 pm-3:30 pm, CL 232: Roundtable, facilitated by Nancy Condee, Chair, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, October 3

The Archive and the Colony: Critical Romani Studies as De-Colonial Practice
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Ethel Brooks, Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies, Rutgers University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The Roma have been the proverbial canaries in the coal mine as nationalism has pushed its way back into Europe, the United States, and the world. What are the insights that Critical Romani Studies can offer today? What connections can be forged between the study of Roma issues and the broader de-colonial turn in knowledge production? To answer these questions, Ethel Brooks offers a poignant and sensitive analysis of her discovery of Grannie Buckland, Gypsy Queen of Berkshire, catalogued among 18th and 19th century European queens in a British archive. To Brooks, images like Grannie Buckland's advanced Britain’s colonial and imperial project. She was but one example of the orientalist project to construct the subject over whom Europe would rule, and now over a century later, allows for “the creation of critical space for de-colonialization.

Ethel Brooks is the author of Unraveling the Garment Industry: Transnational Organizing and Women’s Work (University of Minnesota Press, 2007) which received the award for Outstanding Book for 2010 from the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the co-editor of the special issue of WSQ on "Activisms." Her lecture at the University of Pittsburgh has emerged from her two book projects: Disrupting the Nation: Land Tenure, Productivity and the Possibilities of a Romani Post-Coloniality, and (Mis)Recognitions and (Un)Acknowledgements: Visualities, Productivities and the Contours of Romani Feminism, both of which focus on political economy and cultural production and the increasing violence against Romani (Gypsy) citizens worldwide. She has been a Tate-TrAIN Transnational Fellow at the University of the Arts London since 2012, where she was also US-UK Fulbright Distinguished Chair from 2011 to 2012. Dr. Brooks serves as a member of numerous boards and commissions, including the USC Shoah Foundation, the European Roma Rights Center, and the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. She also served as a Public Member of the United States Delegation to the Human Dimension Implementation meetings of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and is a member of the United States Delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and its Roma Genocide Working Group. In 2016, President Obama appointed her to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Thursday, October 5

From Habsburg Galicia to Cocoaland: History of Development and Polish Social Scientists from 1880s to 1960s
Time:
1:30 pm
Presenter:
Malgorzata Mazurek, Associate Professor of Polish Studies, Columbia University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Few historians have asked about 'development' as an idea unfolding within one specific historical space and representing three big socioeconomic regimes: capitalism, developing/post-colonial economy and socialism. Witnessing transformation of Poland from a supply hinterland of Western Europe (and a space of economic exploitation under Nazi rule), into a modernizing socialist nation-state, Polish economists studied these socio-economic systems comparatively and in a world perspective. But what is even more interesting, they also understood all three of them as overlapping and following each other in their own country's recent past and present. What lessons did Polish social scientists try to convey from this experience to the post-colonial world and how may their contributions change our understanding of history of international development?

Malgorzata Mazurek specializes in modern history of Poland and East Central Europe. Her interests include twentieth-century social sciences, international development, social history of communism and Polish-Jewish relations. Her lecture is based on a new book project that deals with the intellectual history of East Central European involvement in the making of the non-Western world between the late 19th century and 1960s. Dr. Mazurek is part of Socialism Goes Global, an international research project housed at the University of Exeter and funded by the British Arts and Humanities Council, http://socialismgoesglobal.exeter.ac.uk/. Dr. Mazurek's previous book, Society in Waiting Lines: On Experiences of Shortages in Postwar Poland (Warsaw: Trio 2010), has been shortlisted among the ten best books in contemporary Polish history in a 2011 nationwide contest. She is also the author of several articles on comparative and transnational history of labor and consumption in twentieth-century Poland.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Wednesday, October 11

Culture and Security
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institut, Germany
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, Ford Institute for Human Security, Humanities Center and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe
Contact:
Zsuzsánna Magdó
Contact Phone:
412-648-7423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Security studies have given surprisingly little attention to cultural diversity as a constituent factor in the overall dynamics of security management. A case in point is that securitization theory still refers to cultural differences mainly as a source for conflict and therefore as an object of securitization. So far, cultural codes, linguistic barriers, and processes of self-identification did not constitute an important aspect of analysis. Culture as a value based concept and as a group marker, however, is not per se a primary source of conflict. Rather, culture appears as a symbol over and through which security concerns are articulated. Therefore, in multi-cultural societies cultural affiliation plays a crucial role in pre-structuring audiences and security agendas.

Addressing this emerging field of interdisciplinary security studies, this lecture is a lead-up to a day-long Graduate Student Workshop on Thursday, October 12. While the workshop is especially intended to Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science, all are welcome. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs by September 22, 5 p.m.

Since 2007, Peter Haslinger has been the Director of the Herder Institut for Historical Research on East-Central Europe in Marburg, Professor of East-Central European History at the Historical Institute of the Justus Liebig University and the Interdisciplinary Center for Eastern Europe in Gießen (GiZo). His research and teaching focuses on forced migrations and expulsions; the minority question; nationalism, regionalism, language policies; memory, museification, and the politics of history; security and violence studies; the spatial turn and the history of cartography; and the history of discourse and scientific communication. For a list of publications and awards, see https://www.herder-institut.de/en/institute-staff/staff/personen/ansehen....

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Thursday, October 12

Graduate Student Workshop in Security Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institut, Germany
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies, Ford Institute for Human Security, Humanities Center, Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe and Germany
Contact:
Zsuzsánna Magdó
Contact Phone:
412-648-7423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This Graduate Student Workshop follows on the previous day's lecture on Culture and Security. Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science researching security issues are especially welcome. Participants will explore the emerging interdisciplinary field of culture and security studies through a set of readings distributed in advance and will discuss research projects. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs by September 22, 5 p.m.

Friday, October 13

The Russian Revolution as Utopian "Leap in the Open Air of History"
Time:
10:00 am
Presenter:
Mark Steinberg, Professor of Russian History, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Location:
3911 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In the days before the centenary of the October Revolution, this lecture revisits the question of “utopianism” in the Russian revolution - conventionally a negative charge of fanciful desire, wishful illusion, or worse - from the perspective of the streets and diverse lives. Mark Steinberg's newest book, The Russian Revolution, 1905-1921 (Oxford University Press, 2017), will be featured at the Book Table following the lecture.

Mark Steinberg specializes on the cultural, intellectual, and social history of Russia and the Soviet Union in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His recent and current research focuses on urban history, revolutions, emotions, religion, violence, and utopias. From 2006 to 2013, he was editor of the interdisciplinary journal Slavic Review. He is currently completing the 9th edition of A History of Russia and beginning a new project on “the straight and the crooked” in urban spaces in Leningrad, Odessa, and Shanghai in the 1920s and 1930s. At the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, he recently concluded his term as coordinator of the Department of History’s Center for Historical Interpretation, which focused for three years on the them of on Global Utopias (http://globalutopias.weebly.com).

Wednesday, October 25

Daughter of the Cold War
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Grace Kennan Warnecke
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Tuesday, November 7

Putin Country
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Anne Garrels
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Friday, February 23 to Saturday, February 24

Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Time:
8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu