Events


View a comprehensive calendar of events.

Friday, February 23

What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Time:
9:30 am
Presenter:
Ruth Mostern (University of Pittsburgh) and Abigail Owen (Carnegie Mellon University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Saturday, February 24

Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Time:
3:45 pm
Presenter:
Nicholas Breyfogle (Ohio State University), Terje Tvedt (University of Bergen), and Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Wednesday, February 28

The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.

Thursday, March 1

Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

Dusan Makavejev’s Love Affair provides us with an example of cinematic reflexivity, which can be defined as any technique that reminds the viewer that he or she is watching a film. Reflexivity foregrounds the fact that film meaning is a function of a set of codes with ideological implications rather than a transparent reflection of reality. Reflexivity can be achieved through intertextuality, exaggeration of cinematic conventions or conspicuous narration that reminds us of the author’s mark on the text. These techniques are all in evidence in Love Affair, whose textual heterogeneity calls into question the earnestness of cinematic (including socialist) realism as well as the official ideologies of state communism. As Thomas Elsaesser notes, Love Affair juxtaposes three sites of meaning: “the liberating intimacy of a sexual relationship…, the public world of abstract didacticism and cold rationality…, [and] the memory of the Russian Revolution and Tito’s national liberation war”. (Elsaesser, European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood, p. 322) Our understanding of Makavejev’s view of 1960s Yugoslavian society depends on our interpretation of the ironic and tragic relationship between these three sites of meaning. (Alex Lykidis, "Love Affair," Critical Commons)

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Time:
4:45 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Love Affair (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Irina Livezeanu, Department of History

Discussants: Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Saturday, March 3

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Wednesday, March 7

Professional Development Webinars - Introducing the Herder Institute: Collections, Funding Opportunities, and Higher Education Partnerships
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institute
Location:
http://aseees.org/programs/webinars
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe
Cost:
0
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4126487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This webinar is the second in a professional development series co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center. It will use the Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe as an example to explore non-university research institutions prevalent in Europe. First, participants will receive information about the Institute's collections and holdings (including 5 million newspaper clippings, close to 700,000 images, 40,000 historical maps, a library with half a million items etc.). Participants will learn about the fellowship and partnership programs available, in addition to the Institute’s profile in the field of Digital Humanities. Using the Herder Institute as an example, Peter Haslinger will also elaborate on networking strategies on the global level and the forms of cooperation in German academia to foster strategic partnerships between non-university institutions and universities.

To register, visit http://aseees.org/programs/webinars.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Next Webinar

April 11, 12 p.m. (EST)
Doing Research on Eastern Europe in the EU: Research Infrastructures, Grant Models, and Career Mobility

Wednesday, March 21

“Vanity, Laziness, and Skepticism Still Possess Me. But I Continue to Fight...”: Tolstoy’s Aesthetic Cure for Doubt
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Tatyana Gershkovich, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies, Carnegie Mellon University
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies

From his earliest writing on art to his magisterial treatise What is Art? Tolstoy strenuously opposed the idea that aesthetic pleasure is merely sensuous pleasure, which might vary from person to person. He wanted to secure the objectivity and universality of aesthetic judgment, to identify not only what he or his milieu happened to consider true art, but what all people must consider true art. It was not enough for Tolstoy to say that the poems of the Decadents were not his cup of tea; he wished to say they were false and bad and anyone who liked them a corrupt, befuddled, opium-smoking fool—and to be justified in saying so. Why did Tolstoy object so strongly to the idea that our aesthetic response might be subjective? Why was he so zealous in his rejection of aesthetic subjectivism, when so many other artists, particularly in the later decades of the 19th century, accepted it? I will argue that resisting aesthetic subjectivism was not merely an artistic or political imperative for Tolstoy but an existential one. He saw objective aesthetic judgment as a bulwark against a kind of solipsism into which the very process of making art threatened to thrust him.

Saturday, March 24

Serbian Film Festival
Time:
2:00 pm
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Serb National Federation

2:00 PM: THE PROMISE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 74 minutes
Directed By: Zeljko Mirkovic

In a remote village in the southeast of Serbia something unexpected has happened. All of a sudden, a French family has moved to a poor place deserted by the young. They believe they have found a promised land for growing grapes and winemaking. But they have found only old people in the village, distrusting people with old habits. A new challenge awaited them back home in France – how to persuade sommeliers that superior wine can be made in an unknown region? Can they awake hope and breathe a new life into the old village? This marvelous documentary about winemaking in Serbia won nine international awards so far.

3:30 PM: SERBS ON CORFU
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 99 minutes
Author: Sladjana Zaric

A documentary by Radio Television of Serbia describing one of the most tragic events faced by the Serbian people – the exile of the entire nation, army, and government of Serbia to the island Corfu, Greece during World War I. In order to avoid a capitulation of their country to the Austro-Hungary Empire, the Serbian Government and army (including the civilian population) decide to leave their own country and cross Albania during the dead of winter to reach the Allies at the Adriatic Sea. This was a unique case in world history that an entire nation immigrated to save their lives.

6:00 PM: SANTA MARIA della SALUTE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 117 minutes
Directed By: Zdravko Sotra

An enjoyable biographical story about the love between one of the most famous Serbian poets, Laza Kostic, renowned for his sublime poems, and an attractive, educated, charming, and rich young girl, Lenka Dundjerski. Lenka was the daughter of Kostic’s friend, Lazar Dundjerski. She had read Kostic’s poetry before she met him, and he was thirty years older than her. The love affair inspired one of the most beautiful love poems of Serbian and European poetry, Santa Maria della Salute. The movie was one of most popular movies in Serbia in 2016 and 2017.

Sunday, March 25

The Battle for Dukla Pass
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Bill Turkulich
Location:
1500 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pitt Student Slovak Club; Slovak Studies Program

A life-long expert on the Battle of Dukla Pass, Bill Tarkulich will discuss the breadth of the revered, crucial, protracted, and bloody chapter in Slovaks’ confrontation with Nazi control toward World War II, including in-tended strategy, unintended political and social results, personalities, local citizenry. He weighs in on the effects the disastrous battle had on the Slovak National Uprising. Mr. Tarkulich has published several papers on Rusyn family history, homeland history, and genealogy research methods for most families in Slovakia. Many of his methods have become de-facto standards for research in Slovakia in general and the Carpathian Mountains and border lands specifically. He graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology and went on to earn a grad-uate degree at Northeastern University.

Refreshments will be served

Tuesday, April 3

1968: The Year that Rocked Pittsburgh
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with University Honors College

Presented by Emily Ruby or the Heinz History Center. Part of the Global Legacies of 1968 Series, sponsored by the University Honors College.

Saturday, April 7

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Wednesday, April 11

Professional Development Webinars - Doing Research on Eastern Europe in the EU: Research Infrastructures, Grant Models, and Career Mobility
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institute
Location:
http://aseees.org/programs/webinars
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe
Cost:
0
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4126487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This webinar is the third in a professional development series co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center. This webinar will focus on career patterns in academia as well as in the field of infrastructure development in EU-countries. Participants will learn about the formats, chances and challenges for developing a strategy for one’s transnational career path. Against this backdrop and providing significant examples, Peter Haslinger will explain about bilateral and cross-European funding programs - this will also include some thoughts about advancing transatlantic exchange in the field of Eastern European Studies.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Webinars scheduled for Fall 2018:

August
How to Work in Archives in Eastern Europe and Germany

September
Archival Skills

October
Strategies for Career Building and Publishing in the EU versus the US

Friday, April 13

European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Various
Location:
527, 538, and 548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Gina Peirce
Contact Phone:
4126482290
Contact Email:
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Tuesday, April 17

1968: What Have We Learned
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Louis Picard, James Cook, Jae-Jae Spoon, Michael Goodhart, Scott Morgenstern, Nancy Condee
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Jae-Jae Spoon
Contact Email:
spoonj@pitt.edu

Friday, April 27

UCIS Graduation Celebration
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom, O'Hara Student Center
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

Students from all UCIS centers graduating in Spring and Summer 2018 are invited with their families to join this UCIS wide ceremony celebrating their completion of the certificate or BPHIL/IAS.

Saturday, May 5

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Thursday, May 31

The Historical Background of The Pittsburgh Agreement of 1918
Time:
1:30 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with American Friends of the Czech Republic; Friends of Slovakia

The signing of the Pittsburgh Agreement on May 31, 1918, was a milestone leading to the establishment of an independent Czechoslovak state after World War I. The catalyst for the event was the visit to Pittsburgh of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (1850-1937), who led the Slovak and Czech independence movement and later became the first President of Czechoslovakia. By the agreement, Czechs and Slovaks in the United States, acting on behalf of their compatriots in Europe, sanctioned the endeavor to bring about a union of the Czechs and Slovaks in an independent state.

Panelists discussing the historical setting of the Pittsburgh Agreement will be:
• Dr. Hugh Agnew - Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, Washington
• Dr. Matej Hanula - Institute of History of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava
• Dr. Milada Polišenská - Anglo-American University, Prague

Admission free and open to the public

Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29

2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers
Time:
8:30 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Business Center
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4176487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Make college more affordable for your high school students—and help them grow as global citizens and 21st century professional—while earning ACT 48 professional development credits.

The College in High School program and the University Center for International Studies will host a summer institute for secondary educators interested in teaching globally focused courses that offer transferable college credit to students at their high school. Courses in which you can obtain certification and training may include:

Intermediate French I-II
Intermediate German I-II
Intermediate Spanish I-II
Latin Intermediate Prose and Verse
Western Civilization II
World Politics
Imperial Russia

Courses will be aligned with Pennsylvania Core and Academic Standards (for social studies) or ACTFL performance standards (for world languages).

The 2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers is funded through generous support from the Longview Foundation for Education in World Affairs and International Understanding (https://longviewfdn.org/).

For more information and to apply, visit chs.pitt.edu/sipt.

Thursday, April 4 to Saturday, April 6

American Hungarian Educators Association - 44th Annual Conference
Time:
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies