Past Events

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Seminar -- Crisis in Ukraine, Crimea, and Russia: The Religious Factor
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Kadell Dining Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association
Free
Lori Arnold
larnold@pts.edu
http://www.pts.edu/ukraine
Business Briefing -- Jean Monnet Symposium. At the Nexus of Geopolitics: Turkey Today and in the Future
Dr. Yakup Atila Eralp, Director of the EU Center, Middle East Technical University, Turkey
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Rivers Club | 301 Grant Street | Pittsburgh
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
World Affairs Council
WAC members: $25 | Non-members: $50
412-281-7970

Dr. Yakup Atila Eralp is the Director of the EU Center, Middle East Technical University, and is visiting the University of Pittsburgh as a part of the International Research Exchange Scheme. This talk is sponsored by the EUCE/ESC as the 2014 Jean Monnet Symposium with thanks to the World Affairs Council for co-sponsorship.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.
To register, visit www.worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7970. No-shows and cancellations after May 12, 2014 will be charged.

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Lecture -- Europe's Watershed Moment: What the conflict in Ukraine Means for Europe, the U.S., and Relations with Russia
Constanze Stelzenmüller, Senior Transatlantic Fellow, German Marshall Fund of the U.S.
12:00 pm - 1:45 pm
Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
American Council on Germany, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
Free, with EUCE sponsorship (must confirm availability in advance)
Kate Bowersox
kal68@pitt.edu

The EUCE will host a table for faculty interested in learning more about how the conflict in Ukraine impacts European and American relations with Russia. The event should provide information useful for future research and teaching about transatlantic relations. To participate, please contact Kate Bowersox at kal68@pitt.edu.

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Panel Discussion -- European Presidential Debate
European Candidates
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
4209 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.eu
http://www.eudebate2014.eu

Join the EUCE/ESC for a live/virtual viewing party as candidates Jean-Claude Juncker (European People's Party), Martin Schulz (Party of European Socialists), Guy Verhofstadt (Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe Party), and Ska Keller (European Green Party) debate key issues for the presidency of the European Commission. Topics will include unemployment, education, and youth engagement in politics. The event will be held in front of an audience of 700 young people from across Europe and broadcasted live worldwide in 13 languages. American students can submit questions in advance at www.youngvoters.eu.

You too can be a part of the action at the premier U.S.-based virtual viewing party.
We’ll be live tweeting, so if you can’t join in person, join us on-line!

Join us in 4209 Posvar Hall for snacks and to watch the debate.
Or, watch online: www.eudebate2014.eu & www.euronews.com
Follow us on Twitter @EuceEsc
Tweet with us: #EUdeb8watch

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

Teacher Training/Workshop -- French Immersion
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Lecture/Symposium -- “Weak Nationalism—Is it a Useful Category?”
Maria Todorova, Professor of History, University of Illinois
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
and Sociology, Cultural Studies Program; Humanities Center; and the..., English, German, History, Slavic Languages & Literatures
cultural@pitt.edu

This lecture will close the Cultural Studies Common Seminar Colloquium on “Cultural Dis/Union” and will be presented by Maria Todorova, Professor of History at the University of Illinois. An introduction will be provided by Professor Rajani Sudan, Associate Professor of English, Southern Methodist University; responses will be offered by Professor B. Venkat Mani, Associate Professor of German, University of Wisconsin and Professor Robert Hayden, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Russian and East European Studies. The discussion will be led by Nancy Condee, Professor of Slavic and Film Studies and Director of the Global Studies Center.

Cultural Event -- Finding Europe in Pittsburgh
12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Mr. Steve Lund
slund@pitt.edu

Pittsburgh is a city with deep cultural and historical ties to Europe, and those connections have contributed to the dynamic city culture and style that residents enjoy today. The European Union Center of Excellence/European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh is sponsoring a photo contest, “Finding Europe in Pittsburgh,” that showcases the many European influences in our city.

Students (both graduates and undergraduates) are invited to submit photos that showcase some aspect of Europe in the city of Pittsburgh. Possible subjects include food, architecture, festivals, sports, art, people, or anything that speaks of Europe. Feel free to get creative! Winning photos will be announced on Facebook and published in our newsletter. Submit photos to Steve Lund at slund@pitt.edu, along with your name, the photo’s title, and a brief description of the photo’s subject. First prize is $250.00, second prize is $150.00, and third prize is $100.00.

Panel Discussion -- A Parliament Against Itself? The Far Right in the Upcoming European Parliament Elections
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

From May 22 to May 25, voters in 28 members countries of the European Union will elect some 751 members of a newly empowered European Parliament. Since the Treaty of Lisbon came into effect, the EP has gained “co-decision” rights in many policy areas, including agriculture, energy policy, immigration and EU funds. The EP must approve the budget and most visibly, the European Parliament has gained the right to endorse (or not) the members states’ nominee to be President of the European Commission. The Parliament also must give its approval to the Commission as a whole.
But it is the European Parliament’s role as a sounding board of public opinion—on the EU as well as on national governments—that will get the most attention this time. Across Europe—most recently in France—populist, nationalist and Eurosceptic parties have gained in elections, within mainstream parties and in public favor. If this trend is reflected in these “European” elections, the European Parliament may find itself with a significant number of members who are hostile to the goals and aims of the European project.

Audience participation is encouraged. Presenters include Catherine De Vries, University of Oxford; Kostantinos Kourtikakis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne; Will Daniel, Francis Marion University; Borbala Goncz, Corvinus University of Budapest.

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Presentation -- Videoconference about the State and Prospects of the Eurozone
Mr. Ben Carliner, Senior Economist at the Delegation of the European Union to the USA
3:00 pm - 3:45 pm
3431 Posvar Hall
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

Mr. Carliner, an American economist working for the EU Delegation in Washington, D.C., will join the Pitt community via videoconference from the EU Delegation in Washington to offer a talk focused on the E.U. and the future of economic regionalism. He will also answer questions about the nature of the Eurozone crisis, its resolution and its implications for the future of the EU.

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Lecture/Reception -- How Europe went to War in 1914
Christopher Clark, Professor in Modern European History at the University of Cambridge and Author of The Sleepwalkers (2013)
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
European Colloquium of the Department of History
Free, but registration appreciated.
Kathy Gibson
kag36@pitt.edu

Christopher Clark will talk about his most recent, prize-winning book The Sleepwalkers and explain the fascinating story of how political mismanagement in Europe led to the outbreak of World War I. A reception with light refreshments will follow the talk. Please RSVP to Kathy Gibson at kag36@pitt.edu if you are planning to attend the lecture.

Saturday, April 12th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - Long Live Freedom (Viva la Libertà)
7:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA for the closing night of the Italian Film Festival. Then join us for a complimentary Closing Night reception afterwards in the FFA cloisters! Free and open to the public!

Long Live Freedom (Viva la Libertà), 7 p.m. April 12, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive. The leader of the most notorious political opposition party mysteriously disappears. His wife and assistant turn to his identical twin brother, who has recently been released from a psychiatric hospital. Will anyone notice the switch?

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - The Venice Syndrome (Teorema Venezia)
9:00 pm
Posvar Hall 1700
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA for a Pittsburgh film premiere!

The Venice Syndrome (Teorema Venezia), 9 p.m. April 11, 1700 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, 230 S. Bouquet St. Venice, the world’s most beautiful city, is invaded every day by 50,000 tourists. There are only 48,000 residents, and there are fewer every year as the city becomes nearly uninhabitable. The film shows what remains of Venetian life in a requiem for a grand city.

Symposium -- Europe: East and West; Undergraduate Research Symposium
Selected undergraduate students
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
William Pitt Union, Rooms 548, 527 and 837
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, International Business Center
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event since 2002 designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus.

After the initial submission of papers, selected participants were grouped into panels according to their research topics. At the symposium, participants give a 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - The Women Workers’ War
7:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning G-24
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA for our exciting next installment of our annual film festival!

The Women Workers’ War, 7 p.m. April 10, Room 24, Ground Floor, Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave. A documentary recounting the story of two women: one who leads the longest factory sit-in by women in Italy and another who operates a factory that encourages cultural growth among the workers. This screening will feature a special appearance by director Massimo Ferrari.

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

Seminar -- Celtic Interactions with Indigenous People and Slaves in the British Empire: “Critics” or “Agents” of Imperialism?
Peter Karsten
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Posvar 3703 - History Department Lounge
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History

The History Department Work-in-Progress Seminar presents Peter Karsten, University of Pittsburgh. Lead discussants Van Beck Hall and Bernie Hagerty.

NOTE: Text will be circulated three weeks before event. All attending are urged to prepare to take full part in discussion.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Eating in Gezi, Devoured by Gezi: Food and Resistance in 2013 Istanbul Gezi Park Protests
Cengiz Haksöz, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Studies Association, Global Studies Center
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

Food may be a marker of identity, metaphor for social change, and means of resistance. Gezi Park events started after brutal interventions were made by police against Gezi Park occupiers on May 29, 2013, quickly escalating into one of the greatest civil protests in Turkish history, and spreading to other parts of the country. During the events, protesters responded to misinformation from mass media and accusations of the government in a variety of creative ways. Drawing from in-situ observations, news and social media, Haksöz will focus on food as one of these creative responses of the protesters to the government and its mass media, and will analyze how food has been used by the protesters as an ideology, and for solidarity and resistance. PIZZA WILL BE SERVED!

Sunday, April 6th, 2014

Lecture -- From Central Europe to the U.S.: A Slovak Family in the Building of its Proud Nation
John Palka, Author, My Slovakia My Family
2:00 pm
1700 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Pitt Student Slovak Club, Slovak Studies Program

Prof. John Palka's lecture will be based on his book that, while historical in essence, is refreshingly contemporary in its account of the past that his ancestors helped to shape. It contains vivid portraits of courage and love of freedom and country that will resonate with modern Slovak-Americans, it will connect them with the boarder story of their ancestors.

Saturday, April 5th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - The Best Offer (La Migliore Offerta)
7:00 pm
Carnegie Museum of Art Theatre
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA as we show our fourth Pittsburgh premiere film! La migliore offerta tells the story of a genius art expert - come enjoy it at the Carnegie Museum of Art's theater!

The Best Offer (La Migliore Offerta), 7 p.m. April 5, Carnegie Museum of Art Theatre, 4400 Forbes Ave. A world-renowned antiques auctioneer, who leads a solitary life, is appointed to oversee the sale of a beautiful heiress’ art collection and is soon engulfed by a passion that rocks his bland existence.

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - Balancing Act (Gli Equilibristi)
7:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA for the third film in the annual film festival!

Balancing Act (Gli Equilibristi), 7 p.m. April 4, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive. Giulio leads a seemingly idyllic life with his wife and two children, but after making a critical error that unravels everything, he is forced to discover the thin line between well-being and poverty.

Lecture -- Triumphs and Frustrations: Hungarian dissidents & their Western friends, 1973-2004
Victoria Harms
3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Posvar 3703 - History Department Lounge
European Studies Center
Department of History

University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University Graduate Student Symposium
Presents:

Victoria Harms
University of Pittsburgh

Triumphs and Frustrations: Hungarian dissidents & their Western friends, 1973-2004

Lecture/Reception -- Populism & Democracy in Contemporary Italy: North League to 5 Stars Movement
Professor Aide Esu, Distinguished Italian Fulbright Professor, Department of French and Italian
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French and Italian
euce@pitt.edu

Over twenty years of political transformation, Italian populism reflects the full European panorama, moving from a local-xenophobic movement (Lega Nord) to one-man party (Berlusconi), and even to an anti-politics grass-root movement (5 Stars Movement). Professor Esu will analyze the issues, mobilization, leadership, and popular discourse characterizing these movements in order to highlight some of the key questions related to what appears to be fertile ground in Europe for popular mobilization. A reception with light refreshments will follow.

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Lecture -- Political Decentralization in Ukraine: If done right, decentralization can be a great solution for Ukraine
Tymofiy Mylovanov, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Pittsburgh
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Economics
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

Political and economic decentralization is the immediate systemic change needed for Ukraine to become a stable and healthy democracy. Democratic regional decentralization would have three important and distinct benefits for Ukraine's nascent democratic institutions.

1. It would be an effective guarantee that important local economic and social decisions are made by the people most affected by these decisions, rather than being dictated by whichever party comes to power in Kiev.

2. It would reduce the stakes in the conflict in national politics and help focus attention not on whether one region will impose its will on another, but on the urgent economic and political problems facing Ukraine.

3. A vibrant local democracy would do much to strengthen Ukraine's national political institutions and provide a forum where new local politicians can prove themselves, gain the trust of the people and get executive experience.

The lecture will discuss the advantages and the costs of decentralization in Ukraine, the challenges with implementing it politically, and will delineate the difference between decentralization and federalization proposed by Russia.

Lecture -- The Four Waves of Modern Terror: An Essay on Generations
Dr. David C. Rapoport
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
3911 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies
beb38@pitt.edu

Modern terror began in the late 1870s; its distinctive features are its global character, use of explosives, and emergence and recession in the form of waves. We have experienced four waves, the “Anarchist”, “Anti-Colonial”, “New Left” and “Religious”. Each wave contains a large number of independent groups, special purposes, distinctive tactics, and a distinctive geography and has a different impact on the international state system. The overwhelming number of groups in a wave has much shorter lives than a wave does, but if a group does survive the wave it was originally associated with, it absorbs some of the features in the next wave. The first three waves lasted around 40 years or a generation by Biblical standards. If the “Religious Wave” which began in 1979 follows the course of its predecessors it should basically disappear by the 2020’s decade. If history repeats itself, a fifth one will emerge. Lunch will be provided – please RSVP to beb38@pitt.edu

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Presentation/Reception -- German Business Panel
Jeffrey T. Deane, Managing Partner of BKD, LLP; Robert Dehm, of the Economic Department at the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany; Joe Peilert, President & CEO of VEKA Holdings; and Suzi Pegg, Vice President, Global Marketing, Pittsburgh Regional Alliance
12:15 pm - 2:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, International Business Center
Department of German
euce@pitt.edu

Given the German economy’s central role in the Euro Area, and Germany’s place as a strong business partner with the US and Pennsylvania, many people are interested in the characteristics of the German business model. Our panelists will discuss their experiences attracting German companies to the Pittsburgh region, partnering with them in transatlantic relationships, and tips for successful relationships with German companies and colleagues.

Panelists include: Jeffrey T. Deane, Managing Partner of BKD, LLP; Robert Dehm, of the Economic Department at the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany; Joe Peilert, President & CEO of VEKA Holdings; and Suzi Pegg, Vice President, Global Marketing, Pittsburgh Regional Alliance. Q & A will follow the presentations.

All are welcome! Lunch begins at 12:15pm, with the panel discussion to follow at 1pm.

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Lecture -- McLean Lecture: National Security and Intelligence in the 21st Century
Corin R. Stone
6:00 pm
Barco Law Building: Room 109
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Corin R. Stone is the assistant director of national intelligence for policy and strategy in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). In this role, she oversees the formulation and implementation of intelligence community (IC)-wide policy and strategy on the full range of intelligence issues. She also is the ODNI lead for the closure and disposition of detainees at the Guantanamo Bay naval base and provides leadership for ODNI and IC information sharing initiatives. Before joining ODNI, Stone was an attorney adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State. She served in Iraq, first as an associate general counsel in the Coalition Provisional Authority and then as the first legal adviser to U.S. Ambassador John Negroponte and the new U.S. embassy in Baghdad. While at the State Department, she also worked as an attorney adviser for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, as the special assistant to Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV, and in the state department’s legal office, where she handled international claims and investment disputes and represented the U.S. government before the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal and the Hague.

Presentation -- The Impact & Possible Consequences of the European Elections & Career and Internship Possibilities with the EU
Jean-Luc Robert, First Counselor at the European Parliament’s Liaison Office in Washington DC
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Steve Lund
slund@pitt.edu

Jean-Luc Robert was previously a political advisor for Justice and Home Affairs and is now the First Counselor at the European Parliament’s Liaison Office in Washington DC in charge of public diplomacy and university outreach. He will present his viewpoints on the issues and risks that surround the upcoming European Parliament elections. With the Euro Area Crisis, anti-EU populism and the rise of far right parties as part of the current political landscape and public debate, the elections have the potential to create significant changes for the EU and European politics. Additionally, Robert will also talk about career opportunities for students interested in eventually working for or with the EU, and internship possibilities for American students.

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - First Snowfall (La Prima Neve)
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French & Italian

Join us for the second film of the Italian Film Festival! Hosted in conjunction with the Department of French and Italian and Italian Film Festival USA, we are pleased to show this Pittsburgh premiere on Pitt's campus!

First Snowfall (La Prima Neve), 7 p.m. March 29, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive. Set in the beautiful Italian Alps, a fatherless 10 year old and an immigrant who just lost his wife prepare for the upcoming winter and learn to listen to each other while healing.

Presentation -- Status of Human Rights in Northern Ireland: State Collusion – Time for Truth
Niall Murphy and Kevin R Winters, Members Human Rights Attorneys from Belfast, Northern Ireland
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room G-8
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Irish American Unity Conference
Free.
Sarah McAuliffe-Bellin
412.512.9388
sarahm1916@comcast.net

Offering a presentation on long-standing human rights violations and governmental stonewalling of inquiries and reforms in Northern Ireland, human rights attorneys will discuss their experiences as well as proposals for human rights reform. Case profiles that will be discussed include the representation of victims and the reopening of inquests in the Claudy atrocity, Kingsmill, Loughlinisland massacres, and the Dublin/Monaghan Bombing, as well as investigations of sanctioned involvement of the security services in these and other high profile cases from the past 40 years. Dr. Tony Novosel, Professor of History, will provide an introduction and background on the history of collusion in Northern Ireland and its effects on both communities. An opportunity for Q & A will follow the presentation.

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Film -- Italian Film Festival - Reality
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French and Italian

Join the Department of French and Italian for the launch of their annual film festival! Held in conjunction with Italian Film Festival USA, we are pleased to showcase new premiere Italian movies in Pittsburgh! This evening we will hold a free Opening Night reception in the Frick Fine Art cloisters. Free and open to the public!

Reality, 7 p.m. March 27, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive. Luciano never misses the chance to perform for his customers in the fish market. At the urging of his family, he auditions for the reality show Big Brother, forever changing his perception of reality.

Lecture -- The Dining Gaul (And His Phrygian Dishes)
Dr. Shannon Stewart
4:00 pm
125 Frick Fine Arts Building
European Studies Center
AIA Pittsburgh Society
aiapghsociety@gmail.com

Although ancient authors had little interest in recording the details of daily life of the Gauls, excavation and research has generated a large corpus of relevant data especially from Hellenistic houses (333 – 189 BCE) at Gordion, an archaeological site in central Turkey. When considered together, the evidence reveals much about food in its original quotidian context and even more about the residents themselves: what they ate and drank, how it was prepared and served, and how and why these culinary customs changed over time.

Shannon Stewart has excavated in Israel, Cyprus, Turkey and Albania. Her areas of specialization are Hellenistic pottery, the archaeology of domestic life, ”Hellenization,” and Anatolia in the First Millenium BCE.

Lecture -- Sketching Imperial Contours: Mapping Habsburg Borders in the Eighteenth Century
Madalina Veres, University of Pittsburgh
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
History Department Lounge Room 3703, Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History European Colloquium

The History Department Work-in-Progress Seminar presents Madalina Veres, University of Pittsburgh. Lead discussants Elspeth Martini and Katja Wezel.

NOTE: Text will be circulated three weeks before event. All attending are urged to prepare to take full part in discussion.

Panel Discussion -- The View from Ukraine: A Digital Video Conference with the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv
Members of the Political, Economic, Defense and Public Affairs divisions of the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv
9:00 am - 10:00 am
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

Pitt students and faculty are invited to join a group of key staff members from the Political, Economic, Defense, and Public Affairs divisions of the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv for an “off-the-record” question and answer session about the ongoing crisis in Ukraine:

- Press Attaché - Embassy uses of social media tools and the role of social media throughout Ukraine’s political crisis
- Economic Officer – Economic overview
- Politico-Military Affairs Officer – Political overview
- Energy Attaché – Energy issues effecting Ukrainian sovereignty
- DTRO Attaché – 20 years of Cooperative Threat Reduction assistance in Ukraine

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza and Politics: European Elections for National Parties: Electoral Goals and Candidate Selection in the Parties of Europe
Andrea Aldrich, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Political Science
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4209 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

Join the European Union Center of Excellence and European Studies Center for a lunchtime discussion as Andrea Aldrich, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Political Science, presents her research on the national European parties and their relationships with European Elections and Members of the European Parliament. Assuming that political parties have office, vote, and policy seeking goals in any electoral contest, she will argue these goals in European elections are defined by their ability to seize opportunities in national politics and their preferences for European integration. These goals then dictate the choice made for candidate selection for the European Parliament and are able to explain why variation exists among MEPs with respect to their past political experience, party service, European institutional leadership experience, and substantive expertise. In doing so, it highlights the variation in the quality of representation among member states and the impact this has on the quality of representative democracy in the EU. PIZZA WILL BE SERVED.

Lecture -- Croatian Folk Culture in Modern Museums: from Economic to Ethnographic
Heidi Cook, PhD candidate, History of Art and Architecture
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
History of Art and Architecture
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Croatian folk culture has been and continues to be used as cultural legitimization for both a Croatian nation and the integration of that nation into empires. Using documentation of historical displays of Croatian folk art in Vienna and Zagreb, this research explores the early-20th century transition of these objects from Habsburg museums of applied art to newly founded ethnographic museums after World War I. With this change of location the purpose of these collections changed from promoting the economic products of cottage industry and a unified imperial identity to scientific classification for nationalist projects. However, in the underindustrialized Croatian lands, a Habsburg-influenced economic interest in folk art lingered late into the interwar period.

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

Conference -- EuroChallenge
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Conference -- Environment and Energy: Comparison of U.S. and EU Policies
Faculty Organizer: Professor Shanti Gamber-Rabindran
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Pittsburgh Athletic Association
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
GSPIA, Swanson School of Engineering and the Graduate School of...
Free, but registration required.
Kate Lewis Bowersox
kal68@pitt.edu
http://tinyurl.com/luxdmmg

The conference promotes evidence-based policy-making on environment and energy, drawing on policy experiences and research knowledge from the US and the EU. Specifically, the focus will be on the challenge of securing energy for economic growth while ensuring the protection of human health and the environment. The broader conference agenda examines the choice of the energy portfolio of various countries, and how trade-offs should be struck on the benefits and risks of various energy resources. The narrower agenda examines the development of shale gas, its benefits and potential risks, and strategies to mitigate these risks.

The conference is free and open to the public, but registration is required: http://tinyurl.com/lu2rujr.

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Information Session -- All About the Fulbright Award
Tony Claudino, Director, Fulbright Student Program Outreach, Institute of International Education (IIE)
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning 1228
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
University of Pittsburgh Honors College
Shannon Mischler
smischlerpitt@gmail.com

Join the The Director of the Fulbright Student Program Outreach for an information session to learn more about the The Fulbright US Student Program, which promotes mutual understanding through educational and cultural exchange. Fulbright awards provide research/study or English teaching grants in 150+ countries for seniors, graduate students and alumni (US citizenship required). Often students must begin networking before the end of the spring semester to be a competitive applicant. Summer preparation is necessary to meet the campus deadline.
To register for a Fulbright Information Session, or to learn more about the application process, please click on this link: http://scholarships.honorscollege.pitt.edu/calendar.html.

Cultural Event -- Carnegie Mellon’s 2014 International Film Festival: "Faces of Work"
(All day)
Carnegie Mellon University
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Jolanta Lion
jola@cmu.edu
http://www.cmu.edu/faces/

The eighth edition of the Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival is dedicated to the legacy of world-renowned filmmaker, psychologist, and Carnegie Mellon professor, Paul Goodman, and to his professional focus on the human challenges and achievements of diverse groups of workers worldwide. Audiences will have the opportunity to explore "Faces of Work" through Paul's compelling short films along with the Pittsburgh premiere screenings of new, distinctive, and award-winning international films and documentaries from Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Sweden, Romania, Turkey, Poland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Germany, France, Egypt, Chad, Iran, India, Japan, Vietnam, China, Canada, and the USA.

The Faces Festival is an annual celebration of international film and its potential to shine a light on the human faces involved in shaping our contemporary social landscape. Audiences are encouraged to explore the numerous complex themes of these films beyond the screenings themselves by participating in audience Q&A sessions with directors, artists, academics, and professionals; by engaging with interactive performances by student artists; and by sampling exotic foods and international cuisine from local eateries.

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Lecture -- Iberian Perspectives in the Global Pacific
Rainer F. Buschmann
4:00 pm
3703 Posvar
European Studies Center
Department of History; World History Center

The global history of the Pacific made good progress over the last few years.
David Armitage, Alison Bashford, David Igler, and Matt Matsuda have written important
books bridging events occurring both in the island and littoral Pacific. The attempt to
link the island worlds of Oceania with the continental landmasses of Asia and the
Americas has also been at the center of my research.
The “Spanish Lake” refers to a convenient historical shorthand signaling a period,
during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, of increasing European expansion into the
Pacific. Historical investigations have long focused on the economic implications of the
Manila Galleon exchange as the onset of true globalization. However, the Manila
Galleon route linking colonial Latin America with East and Southeast Asia had limited
impact on the island world of Oceania. In my talk, I will argue for an expanded notion of
the “Spanish Lake” that moves well beyond the Manila-Acapulco link.
My seminar will be divided into two interrelated parts. Firstly, I will outline the
Pacific’s comparative framework by reading this ocean against the Atlantic and Indian
worlds. The second part of the presentation will situate my Iberian research into the
emerging global conceptualization of the Pacific.

Lecture -- Roundtable Talk: Ukraine in Crisis
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
3911 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
International Security Organization, the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security...
ejm76@pitt.edu

The Cold War “ended” with the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Almost 23 years later, the division between Russia and the West has returned to the forefront of U.S. national security concerns. Ukraine, a former Soviet Socialist Republic, is now a flashpoint for conflict. Russia threatens to invade Ukraine to protect the Russian population living there after pro-Western protestors overthrew the pro-Russian Yanukovych regime. Russia’s interests are driving Russian forces to take control of the Crimean peninsula where a Russian Navy base is located. Fearing escalation of the conflict, the West is attempting to find a diplomatic solution.

Please join the International Security Organization and the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies for presentations on the crisis in Ukraine by Dr. Phil Williams, Director of the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies, Wesley W. Posvar Chair in International Security Studies and Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Dr. Ryan Grauer, Assistant Professor of International Affairs, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Dr. Ronald Linden, Director of the EU Center of Excellence and the European Studies Center and Professor of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh, and Dr. Tymofiy Mylovanov, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Pittsburgh.

Pizza and refreshments will be provided -- Please RSVP to EJM76@pitt.edu

Lecture -- The Cost of Euro Adoption in Poland
Svitlana Maksymenko, Lecturer, Department of Economics
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Economics
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

The paper investigates the potential effects of euro adoption on the Polish economy. It analyses how a replacement of the national currency -zloty, and therefore an elimination of a real exchange rate, affects output fluctuations. In the paper, we develop a utility-based theoretical framework to provide a metric for judgment of alternative monetary policies; identify and estimate the sources of aggregate fluctuations; and calibrate the model's structural parameters to Polish economy. Our results show that the real exchange rate did in fact serve as an external shock absorber in Poland in 1990-2012. Its elimination should be interpreted as a cost of euro adoption to the national economy.

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Lecture -- Same-sex Marriage: From Europe to the Global Arena
David Paternotte
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
4500 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French and Italian and The Dietrich School of..., Women's Studies Program
euce@pitt.edu

This talk examines this process of global diffusion, highlighting the specific role played by European activists. Given the diversity of countries where same-sex marriage is currently under discussion, structural causes once put forward to explain the emergence of same-sex marriage in Western societies must now be challenged. This talk thus argues that more complex explanations are now necessary, and suggests two new factors that must be taken into account: first, the insertion of same-sex marriage within global politics (which also explains Putin’s resistance to LGBT rights), and, second, the increasingly legal nature of marriage claims compared to earlier claims to civil or domestic partnership. Although debates on same-sex marriage are now global, this talk also discusses Europe’s specific role in the globalization of this debate, as the continent remains the main region where same-sex couples are allowed to marry.
Responses to the lecture will be given by Dr. Helma de Vries-Jordan, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, and Anthony C. Infanti, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, University of Pittsburgh.

Panel Discussion -- The Thorn and The Thistle in Europe's Side? English and Scottish Nationalism and the Future of the EU
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

In this month’s installment of our Conversations on Europe virtual roundtable series, a panel of experts and audiences from European Union Centers across the U.S. will engage in a discussion of the upcoming Scottish referendum on independence from Britain scheduled for September of this year and the possibility of a UK referendum on EU membership that could occur as early as 2016. How likely is Scottish independence? What would be the prospects of an independent Scotland in the European Union? How might the story be complicated by the specter of a British exit (aka “Brexit”) from the EU? How likely is a British yes vote on exit and how might such a vote impact the EU going forward? Presenters include John Curtice, Deputy-Director of Center for Research into Elections and Social Trends and Professor of Politics at the University of Strathclyde; Neill Nugent, Emeritus Professor of Politics and Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration at Manchester Metropolitan University; and the University of Pittsburgh's Andrew Strathern, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Anthropology and Pamela Stewart, Senior Research Associate and Co-Director of the Cromie Burn Research Unit, Department of Anthropology. Audience participation is welcomed in what promises to be a spirited discussion!

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Festival -- Taras Shevchenko 200th Anniversary Concert
3:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building Auditorium
European Studies Center
Nationality Rooms; The Ukrainian Room Committee

The Ukrainian Room Committee and the Nationality Rooms Program proudly present the
Taras Shevchenko 200th Anniversary Concert this Sunday, March 9th at 3 PM in the
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium.

Taras Shevchenko, born in 1814, was a Ukrainian poet, writer, artist, folklorist,
and ethnographer. Known for many masterpieces of painting and illustration, his
literary heritage is also regarded to be the foundation of modern Ukrainian
literature and language.

This event, featuring readings of Shevchenko's poetry, displays of his artwork, and
an opera performance, is free and open to the public. Donations are greatly
appreciated.

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

Lecture -- "National Security and Intelligence in the 21st Century
Corin R. Stone
6:00 pm
Barco Law Building: Room 109
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for International Legal Education
Gina Huggins
glclark@pitt.edu

Corin R. Stone (JD’ 98) is the assistant director of national intelligence for policy and strategy in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). In this role, she oversees the formulation and implementation of intelligence community (IC)-wide policy and strategy on the full range of intelligence issues. She also is the ODNI lead for the closure and disposition of detainees at the Guantánamo Bay naval base and provides leadership for ODNI and IC information sharing initiatives. Before joining ODNI, Stone was an attorney adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State. She served in Iraq, first as an associate general counsel in the Coalition Provisional Authority and then as the first legal adviser to U.S. Ambassador John Negroponte and the new U.S. embassy in Baghdad. While at the state department, she also worked as an attorney adviser for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, as the special assistant to Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV, and in the state department’s legal office, where she handled international claims and investment disputes and represented the U.S. government before the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal in the Hague.

Lecture -- Endogenous Form. Goethe's Theory of Art and its Idealist Unfolding
David Wellbery
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 602
European Studies Center
Department of German

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

Teacher Training/Workshop -- Hands-On Social Media Workshop: Understanding and Using Virtual Communities in the Classroom and Beyond
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
National Consortium for Teaching about Asia
Free
Jennifer Murawski
jennm@pitt.edu

Do you consider yourself a very basic user of Facebook? Do you know the difference between Twitter and Tumblr? Have you tried to create a wiki for a class project, or does the very idea keep you up at night? Pitt’s international studies outreach program will host an interactive workshop to help teachers improve their use of social media websites and tools for education and personal use, including:

· Collaborative projects (for example, Wikispaces)
· Blogs and microblogs (for example, Twitter)
· Social news networking sites (for example, Reddit)
· Content communities (for example, YouTube)
· Social networking sites (for example, Facebook)

Participants are highly encouraged (but not required) to bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone to this workshop in order to gain full hands-on experience in setting up user accounts, understanding how these sites can help or hinder educational projects, and explore what other educators have done to successfully add a social media dimension to school or personal projects.

Dinner and parking provided with registration.

Lecture -- But For Us It's Genocide! Transitional Justice and Memory Politics in Post-Soviet Latvia
Dr. Katja Wezel, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
3702 Posvar Hall; History Department Lounge
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History

Katja Wezel's research interests focus on 19th and 20th century Baltic history and transnational, comparative approaches to the study of memory politics and cultural conflicts in Eastern Europe. Professor Wezel studied History and English at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), the University of Wales, Aberystwyth (UK) and the European University in St. Petersburg (Russia). From 2005 to 2008 she was a member of an interdisciplinary graduate research group on Overcoming Dictatorships in Europe at Heidelberg University, Germany. She received her PhD in 2011 for a thesis on memory politics in post-Soviet Latvia. She has worked as a research associate for the Department of East European History and as a lecturer in history at the University of Heidelberg. In 2013 she obtained a DAAD Visiting Assistant Professorship at the Department of History/University of Pittsburgh where she teaches courses on Nationalism, German History and Comparative European History.

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Lecture -- Kafka and the Art of Interpretation
David Wellbery
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 602
European Studies Center
the Department of German
Lecture -- Europe and the Collapse of Yugoslavia: The Role of Non-State Actors and European Diplomacy
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

Branislav Radeljic offers a fresh analysis of the role of the European Community in the disintegration of the Yugoslav state. He explores the economic, political and social aspects that eroded the relationship between the two parties. By looking at the EC’s relations with Yugoslavia from the late 1960s, under the presidency of Josip Broz Tito, through to the collapse of the Yugoslav federation in 1992 after the rise of Slobodan Milošević and the beginning of the Yugoslav Wars, starting in 1991, professor Radeljic places emphasis on the role of non-state actors and their capacity to contribute and affect policy-making processes at EC level. Accordingly, he shows how the lack of direction and inadequate political mechanisms within the EC enabled these actors to take centre stage, and how EC paralysis precipitated bloody conflict in the Balkans.

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Lecture -- Women and Deception in Pindar’s Myths
Arum Park
4:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 236
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

Several of Pindar's victory odes contain mythical digressions that include a deceptive female character: the Hera-cloud in Pythian 2, Coronis in Pythian 3, and Hippolyta in Nemean 5. These figures reflect a deceptive, seductive female archetype established in earlier traditions (cf. Hesiod's Pandora, Semonides 7, Potiphar's wife), but the Pindaric examples are striking for the degree to which they are shaped to suit their particular generic context. As a genre predicated on reciprocity as its fundamental principle, epinician poetry depicts the deceptiveness of female figures as detrimental specifically to relationships based on mutual respect and exchange. These relationships parallel that between the poet and his patron. Pindar¹s adaptation of earlier archetypes demonstrates the influence that literary context can have on depictions of gender and suggests that awareness not only of historical but also of generic context must inform our understanding of gender.

Saturday, March 1st, 2014

Teacher Training/Workshop -- French Immersion
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Lecture -- A Sage on the Stage? Plato, Socrates, and Attic Comedy
Jacques A. Bromberg
4:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 244B
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

It has long been observed that there is something comedic in the writings of Plato. Yet Plato’s dialogue with Greek Comedy is not limited to his colorful characters, unusual settings, and witty conversations: it is rather in exposing the pretensions of Athenian public figures that Plato and the writers of Old Comedy have perhaps the most in common. Between around 430 B.C. and the end of the fifth century, a series of intellectuals and educators were parodied on the comic stage, including of course Socrates, the target of what Aristophanes called his "most sophisticated" comedy: Clouds of 423 B.C. But despite this claim, Clouds belongs to a comic tradition about Socrates and his associates that is well attested in the fragmentary works of Aristophanes’ comedian-rivals. An examination of these lost comedies not only enables us to reconstruct a once-popular comic subgenre, but also deepens our understanding of the figure of Socrates and enriches our readings of the Platonic corpus.

Conference -- 9th Annual Graduate Student Conference
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Pittsburgh
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
European Union Studies Association, U.S. Network of European Union Centers of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

In many ways, the EU appears to be in a period of transition: recovering from the financial crisis, continuing to implement the Lisbon Treaty’s provisions, and awaiting a new set of European elections. Have these developments produced change in the EU’s politics and policies, or has it been Brussels as usual? The Organizing Committee of the Ninth Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union welcomes graduate students from around the world to contribute to the theme of the conference, as well as others related to the EU.

In addition to panels at which students will present their work, two roundtables have been organized with help from co-sponsors the European Union Studies Association (EUSA) and the U.S. Network of European Union Centers of Excellence. The first roundtable will focus on the current state of EU studies. Panelists will include Michelle Cini (co-editor of JCMS), Alberta Sbragia (Vice-Provost and Professor of Political Science), and John Keeler (Dean of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs). Professor Guy Peters (Political Science) will chair. The second roundtable will be discuss the ins and outs of the job search process. Erica Edwards, Executive Director of the EUCE at UNC-Chapel Hill, will chair.

The Keynote Address will be provided by Michelle Cini, University of Bristol. Her talk will be entitled: “Membership 'as usual': why Britain will (probably) stay in the European Union?”

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Lecture -- The Odyssey's Critique of its Audience
Katherine Kretler
4:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 244B
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

They Odyssey has a dim or ironic view of epic glory. It holds up a mirror for an audience who has come to hear of such glory, and does so in moments that are virtuosic as scripts. We will perform a couple of these moments to better understand how they work on the stage, as opposed to the page. We will then turn to how Plato used one of them in his homage to the power of Homer, thinly disguised as a parody, in his Ion.

Conference -- European Cultural Dis/Union
Faculty Organizer: Dr. Randalle Halle
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
PAA
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of German
kal68@pitt.edu
euce@pitt.edu

Globalization, transnationalism, planetarity designate as much cultural forces as economic and political. However these dynamics do not affect the planet equally; rather regions and areas have distinct profiles. This conference takes as its task the exploration of cultural unification fostered by the EU. The European Union has set as its primary goal the political, economic, and cultural union of Europe. This combination of goals makes the EU unique among the world’s transnational organizations. Indeed, while many organizations have arisen to foster global free trade arrangements or international treaties, nowhere is there an equivalent focus on fostering a common culture. Along with attention to the cultural production compelled by the EU in the current moment, the conference will of necessity attend to the geographic and historical complexities of European cultural unification. Panels and presentations will be open to the public.

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Presentation -- Connectedness in the Islamic World (661-1300 CE)
Maxim Romanov
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Department of History, Department of Linguistics, Department of Religious Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, University Honors College, World History Center

Medieval Arabic sources are replete with stories about Muslims traveling far and wide. The abundance of such examples tempts one to believe that these traveling individuals created and maintained the pan-Islamic cultural commonwealth. Yet the Islamic written legacy is so vast that drawing decisive conclusions that traveling was indeed as widespread as our sources suggest is hardly possible. This presentation describes the use of computer-assisted research methods to enable an analysis of 29,000 biographies drawn from the massive 50-volume Taʾrīkh al-islām (“The History of Islam”), written by the Damascene historian al-Dhahabī (d. 748/1348).

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

Lecture -- Perspectives on Tourism: Defining the Self and the Other in Interwar Hungary and Socialist Romania
Andrew Behrendt and Adelina Stefan, Department of History
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
History Department Lounge Room 3703, Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History European Colloquium

The Department of History European Colloquium presents Emanuela Grama, Carnegie Mellon University. Presenters: Andrew Behrendt and Adelina Stefan. Emanuela Grama from Carnegie Mellon University will be the main commentator on their papers and presentations.

Lecture -- Why Ukraine Matters
Marina Duane
1:30 pm
3800 Posvar
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
GSPIA, Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership

In the past few months, Ukraine has received more international attention than in
all of its 22 years of independence combined. Protests have swept the country over
the past two months with the situation rapidly changing up until this moment. In the
face of government sponsored intimidation and violence, everyday people including
students, businessmen and journalists have taken to the streets to defend their
civil liberties and democratic values.

Join former GSPIA student and Ukrainian citizen, Marina Duane, in a discussion of
the current situation in Ukraine and its importance in the international community.
We will explore the new form of leadership developing within the movement, discuss
the power of social media, and try to understand the political stance of the EU, US
and Russia.

Marina is originally from Ukraine where she worked on building civil society. She
graduated from GSPIA in 2013 with Master in International Development. She currently
works on domestic issues in local government but her heart remains in Ukraine during
this pivotal time.

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

Lecture -- The Most Recent "New Sappho" and Its Indo-European and Greek Resonances
Edwin D. Floyd
4:00 pm
337 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

Every few years, important new material concerning Greek lyric poetry comes to light. The most recent is the announcement of some potentially extremely important new fragments of Sappho's poetic oeuvre. Unfortunately, there are also many questions associated with this; cf. Adrian Murdoch's blog, "Bread & Circuses", at this site.
The original posting of the new article was, however, still available (as of Feb. 4) here. *Scoll down the webpage, which is in French for the English text. (That site, dealing with literature "littérature" indeed uses the spelling "actualitte".)
Muddying the waters, beyond the mere question of possible forgery, is another point that seems not to have been mentioned (as of Feb. 4) in online discussion of the newly circulated poem concerning Sappho's brother Charaxos. This is the fact that the poem contains some fairly straightforward (and potentially very important) Indo-European poetic patterning, paralleling what is found in Sappho, fr. 58, published in 2005.

Panel Discussion -- Spy Games: Technology and Trust in the Transatlantic Relationship
Ami Pedahzur, Professor of Government at the University of Texas-Austin; Pia Bungarten, Friedrich Ebert Foundation Representative to the U.S. and Canada; Annegret Bendiek, German Institute for International and Security Affairs; Anthony Glees, Professor of Politics and Director of the Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies, University of Buckingham; and David Harris, School of Law, Pitt
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

The Guardian first revealed the NSA's comprehensive surveillance program in early June of last year, working from information from the now-infamous Edward Snowden. Two weeks later, a series of articles exposed NSA and British spying on European and South American officials at a G20 meeting and by the end of the month, Der Spiegel had published details of America’s electronic surveillance and bugging of European Union offices and the embassies of France, Italy, Greece, and others. German Chancellor Angela Merkel was particularly upset over revelations that her personal cellphone had been compromised. European, particularly German, outrage over what has been characterized as U.S. spying on its allies has exposed a number of differences in the European and American approaches to data privacy and protection, national security and surveillance. But have the revelations significantly damaged the transatlantic relationship? At a time when U.S.-European cooperation is becoming more formalized in talks to create a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), have the NSA spy scandals dampened European enthusiasm to work closely with American allies? More generally, how have new technologies changed intelligence gathering practices? And to what extent can comprehensive surveillance programs like PRISM be subject to legal limitations on a national or global scale? The discussion will be moderated by EUCE Director and Professor of Political Science, Ronald Linden. Audience participation is encouraged.

Friday, February 14th, 2014

Lecture -- A Slice of the Feast at Thebes: Paradigm and Form in Homeric Allusion to Myth
Benjamin Sammons
4:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning: 244B
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

Twice in the Iliad (4.370-418, 5.800-813), a rousing tale of Tydeus’s embassy to Thebes is told to his son Diomedes. Is it a coincidence that this rather obscure story should constitute Homer’s only extended allusion to the famous war of the “Seven against Thebes”? Does this choice merely reflect the rhetorical needs of Agamemnon and Athena, who seek to stir Diomedes to deeds of valor? I argue that the two passages, taken together, reveal a unitary conception and literary form that go well beyond the rhetorical needs of these speakers. What is really at work in the choice of this episode is the poet’s instinctive habit of seeking out and refashioning “off-center” but highly exemplary episodes within larger traditions.

Exhibit -- 2014 Language Fair
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
William Pitt Union
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Yinzling Linguistics Club
Free

This event will take place on Friday, February 14th from 1:00 to 4:00 PM in the William Pitt Union Assembly Room, Ball Room, and Kurtzman Rooms. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the variety of language courses, programs, scholarships, and student organizations available to them at Pitt. Last year's language fair was a major success with over 400 students in attendance. We hope to build on this success in 2014.

The integral language requirement of UCIS certificate programs, and study abroad programs provides an excellent opportunity for students to become acquainted with a language as well as the people who speak it.

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

Lecture -- Collective Memory, Law and the Eurozone Crisis
Patrick O'Callaghan, Department of Law, University College Cork
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for International Legal Education, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Professor O’Callaghan explores the role of collective memory in the Eurozone crisis from a lawyer's perspective. The idea of collective memory features prominently in several disciplines but rarely in legal scholarship. He argues that the idea of collective memory can help us to better understand fundamental aspects of the EU Treaty framework and secondary legislation, and may also provide instructive insights about the policy responses to the Eurozone crisis.

Friday, February 7th, 2014

Information Session -- International Career Toolkit Series: Teaching English Abroad
Pitt Alumni
3:00 pm
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center

This will be an information session for those interested in teaching English abroad on. Pitt Alumni will present on their experiences teaching in France, Chile, and China.

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Information Session -- International Career Toolkit Series: Careers with the U.S. State Department
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center

This is an information session for those interested in a career with the U.S. State department. It will cover how to apply, information on their internship program and various career opportunities.

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Lecture -- How Russian Pop Music 'Soshla s uma': the Legacies of MTV and Eurovision
Theodora Kelly Trimble, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Free
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

After the arrival of MTV in the 1990s, Eurovision also influenced trends in Russian popular music. A performance by the Russian band, t.A.T.u., in the song contest in 2003 triggered international controversy and, at the same time, set the model for emerging patterns and trends in the popular music community. Russian popular music and music video aesthetics are still influenced by the performance at Eurovision ten years ago. It is worth examining, therefore, the ways in which the politics of Eurovision still influence Russian popular music and music video aesthetics.

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

Lecture -- That Kind of Party
Dr. Eckhart Nickel
5:00 pm
European Studies Center
Presented by the Departments of German and English, the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Dr. Stefan Bronner
sab206@pitt.edu

To read a good book is like going to a great party. You are aesthetically
entertained, meet new and interesting people and, in an ideal world, witness some
real human drama fueled by the side effects of euphoria and excess. When transformed
into literature, parties are one of the most challenging topics of writing. In the
autonomous zone of celebration, world apart from daily life and routines, a writer,
just like any other guest, has to survey multitudes of synchronized social action to
stay on top of things. His task: to enjoy himself and please the reader at the same
time while being ahead of the crowd. Therefore the feast in literature can be read
as a playground to show narrative skills at work. The lecture will discuss the
stylistic and strategic approach towards parties in a few central texts of 20th
century literature from Thomas Mann to F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Information Session -- International Career Toolkit Series: Post-Graduation Community Service
3:00 pm
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center

This is an information session for those interested in community service opportunities after graduation in the United States and abroad. There will be representatives and alumni from organizations including PULSE, the Peace Corps, City Year, and Omprakash who will share their experiences and present on how to apply and what to expect.

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Panel Discussion -- Conversations on Europe Videoconference Series: The "Big Bang" 10 Years Later: East Europe and the EU After Expansion
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Dr. Allyson Delnore
delnore@pitt.edu

The European Union Center of Excellence & European Studies Center is pleased to present the first Spring 2014 Conversations on Europe Videoconference.
Panelists will discuss the 2004 enlargement, which witnessed the growth of the EU from 15 member states to 25, and assess the impact of that expansion on the entering member states and the institutions of the European Union.
Participants will include Geoffrey Harris (European Parliament Liaison Office), Zoltan Barany (University of Texas), Jacques Rupnik (Sciences Po), Carolyn Ban (GSPIA), and Andrew Konitzer (REES, Political Science). Ron Linden, Director of the EUCE/ESC, will moderate.
Video recordings of previous Conversations on Europe, as well as a copy of the full Spring semester schedule can be found on the EUCE/ESC Website. To learn how to become involved, please email Dr. Allyson Delnore, Associate Director of the Center.

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Lecture -- Remaking the Polis: Asylum, Radical Politics, & (Mis)Recognition in Greece
Dr. Heath Cabot, Department of Anthropology
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
3106 Posvar Hall, Department of Anthropology
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Professor Cabot reflects on how asylum, humanitarian aid and radical migrant politics reconfigure the relationship between rights and political recognition, amid rapidly changing conceptions of citizenship in Greece. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2005 and 2011, Dr. Cabot shows how humanitarian aid encounters provide venues for dialogical forms of negotiation, miscommunication, recognition, and misrecognition between aid workers and clients, as well as for potentially transformative social ties. She is visiting the University of Pittsburgh as a candidate for a position in the Department of Anthropology.

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Presentation -- Vilnius Lessons: Reflections on the First Lithuanian EU Presidency
Ambassador of the Republic of Lithuania, Zygimantas Pavilionis
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Ambassador Pavilionis visits the Center to reflect on the Lithuanian Presidency of the Council of the European Union—the first time the Presidency has been held by a state that emerged from the USSR--and to share his ideas about the future of the EU and Lithuania’s relationship with its fellow EU member states. Refreshments will be served.

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Information Session -- Euro Challenge Orientation
(All day)
European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

Lecture -- Mental Health Policy and Practice in Scotland: New Learnings in the Auld Country
GEOFF HUGGINS Head, Division of Mental Health and Protection of Rights, Division of the Scottish Government and RUTH GLASSBOROW Project Director, Directorate of Scrutiny and Assurance, Healthcare Improvement Scotland
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Anthropology
euce@pitt.edu

Mental Illness is one of the top public health challenges in Europe as measured by prevalence, burden of disease and disability. It is estimated that mental disorders affect more than a third of the population every year, the most common being depression and anxiety. Featuring experts from Scotland, this presentation aims to describe how the Scottish government is tackling mental health and related issues, as understanding grows and the stigma of mental illness is decreasing.

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

Presentation -- Translating “Barry Trotter and the Unauthorized Parody”: Parody, Humor, & Harry Potter
Annunziata Ugas, University of Cagliari, Italy
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
3504 Cathedral of Learning (University Honors College)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of English, Department of French & Italian
frit@pitt.edu

Annunziata (Ann) Ugas, a visiting MA-level student from the University of Cagliari in Italy (Sardegna) and Center Associate within the European Union Center of Excellence, has been working on her translation studies while at the University of Pittsburgh. She will offer a talk based on her research. She will discuss the challenges of translating a parodic text (Barry Trotter and the Unauthorized Parody), and Professor Dennis Looney (French & Italian) and Professor Carol Bové (English) will respond to Ann’s presentation.

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Conference -- Afghanistan: A Regional Way Forward
Keynote Speaker: Ambassador Peter Tomsen (GSPIA '64)
8:30 am - 3:30 pm
University Club
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies, U.S. Institute of Peace, World Affairs Council or Pittsburgh
Beverly Brizzi
beb38@pitt.edu

This conference features keynote speaker Ambassador Peter Tomsen (GSPIA ’64), Former U.S. Special Envoy to Afghanistan and Author of "The Wars of Afghanistan". An R.S.V.P. is required. To attend, please email Beverly Brizzi by Monday, December 2nd, to confirm your registration.

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

Workshop -- Model EU - High School
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza and Politics: "Valued Exports: Social Standards in EU and US Trade Agreements"
Evgeny Postnikov, PhD Candidate in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

Join the Center as we enjoy pizza and politics during the lunch hour for a discussion offered by Center Library Research Advisor, Evgeny Postnikov. His talk will focus on the bilateral preferential trade agreements (PTAs) of the European Union (EU) and the United States, which are increasingly being used as vehicles for exporting social regulation, such as labor and environmental standards. Despite the similarity in terms of the inclusion of such provisions, design varies greatly between U.S. and EU agreements. Postnikov examines the disparity between both parties’ execution of these PTAs with paired cases of EU-Chile, U.S.-Chile, EU-South Korea, and U.S.-South Korea PTAs, relying on data from interviews with interest groups and policy-makers in Brussels, Washington, Santiago, and Seoul. PIZZA WILL BE SERVED.

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Lecture/Panel Discussion -- France as a Global Leader
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Wisconsin-Madison
euce@pitt.edu

February 19, 2013, Newsweek published an article that was provocatively titled “France: Leader of the Free World.” Even more provocatively, the subtitle taunted U.S. leaders with “The French are a decisive, manly superpower. Unlike America.” Gendered rhetoric aside, French foreign policy in recent years has led other powers to take note. Rather than waiting for collective decisions from NATO or the EU and citing historical interests in the region, the French intervened in Libya and the Ivory Coast under President Sarkozy and Mali under President Hollande. As a result, the French have reaffirmed claims to a special role in Africa. Is this a new assertion of Gaullism? Or are claims of French world leadership exaggerated or even undermined by domestic concerns over rising unemployment, growing right-wing nationalism in response to immigration from North and West Africa, and increasing market instability? In the next Conversation on Europe, a panel of experts will be asked to comment on recent developments in French foreign policy and how they relate to domestic and regional concerns. Joining the conversation will be Professor Laird Boswell (History, University of Wisconsin-Madison), Professor Jean-Philippe Mathy (French, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), and David Pettersen (French & Italian, University of Pittsburgh). The Conversation will be conducted entirely in French and audience participation will be encouraged. Venez nous joindre pour une discussion qui sera certainement informative et très animée!

Friday, November 15th, 2013

Lecture -- "The (Relative) Decline of the West and the Rise of the Rest"
Senator Mircea Geoana
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, International Week
The Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation (USA)
euce@pitt.edu

Mircea Geoana served as President of the Romanian Senate from 2008 to 2011 and Chairman of the Social Democratic Party from 2005 to 2011. In 2009 he was a candidate for President of the country. He has served as Ambassador to the United States and as Chair in Office of the OSCE. Goeana’s views on foreign policy, transitional economies and globalization have been featured in the New York Times, International Herald Tribune, The Atlantic, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, CNN, BBC, PBS, Bloomberg, TV5 and Fox Business.

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Lecture -- "A European Literature?"
Wlad Godzich
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Humanities Center
humctr@pitt.edu

Repeats every day until Fri Nov 15 2013 .
Monday, November 11th, 2013

Cultural Event -- INTERNATIONAL WEEK, November 11-15, 2013
(All day)
WPU and 2400 Sennot Square
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Week, Nationality Rooms, Study Abroad Office

Stay tuned for fun events all week!

Saturday, November 9th, 2013

Performance -- STAGED READING OF "IF THE WHOLE BODY DIES"
Robert Skloot
8:00 pm
Charity Randell Theatre/Stephen Foster Memorial
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

A new play about Raphael Lemkin by Robert Skloot. Followed by Q&A with the author.

Panel Discussion -- Closing Discussion
Paul A. Bove
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

Closing Discussion, Paul A. Bove, Chair

Panel Discussion -- Third Panel Discussion
Bruce Robbins, Jonathan Arac, Donald E. Pease
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

Third Panel Discussion: Bruce Robbins, Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University, “Some of My Best Friends Are Zionists”, Jonathan Arac, Mellon Professor of English and Director of the Humanities Center, University of Pittsburgh “What Can We Learn from Uniqueness?” and Donald E. Pease, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, The Ted and Helen Geisel Third Century Professor in the Humanities, Chair of the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, Dartmouth College “Said’s Melville”

Panel Discussion -- Second Panel Discussion
QS Tong, RA Judy
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

Second Panel Discussion: QS Tong, Professor of English, University of Hong Kong “The Question of Tibet and Orientalism”, and RA Judy, Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh “‘Gods always fail’: Said as an Index of Secular Humanism, the Arab Revolution, and Frantz Fanon”, Daniel T. O’Hara, First Term Mellon Professor of English, Temple University “On Late Style? The Question of a New Beginning”

Panel Discussion -- First Panel Discussion
Wlad Godzich, Stathis Gourgouris
9:30 am - 10:50 am
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

First Panel Discussion: Wlad Godzich, Distinguished Professor of Literature, UCSC, and Visiting Fellow, the Humanities Center, University of Pittsburgh “The Stateless and the Proper” Stathis Gourgouris, Professor, Institute of Comparative Literature & Society, Classics, Columbia University “The Epistemology of Edward Said”

Teacher Training/Workshop -- World On Trial
8:00 am - 4:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Center for Global Studies at Penn State
Free
Veronica Dristas
dristas@pitt.edu

THIS EVENT IS NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. THIS WORKSHOP IS INTENDED FOR K-12 EDUCATORS
For K-12 teachers who would like a creative approach to bringing a global issue to the classroom. The pilot episode of World on Trial deals with the 2004 French Law banning the conspicuous display of religious symbols in public schools, most notably affecting the right of young Muslim women to wear traditional head scarves or other forms of cover. Workshop participants will watch the episode and hear from experts on the history of law, the significance of the law and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the curriculum and supplementary materials designed for use with the televised program. Act 48 available

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Lecture -- Reading and questions from the recent fiction of Nuruddin Farah
Nuruddin Farah
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center
Lecture -- Kristallnacht as Prelude to Genocide
ROBERT SKLOOT
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning 208B
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Testimonies of Kristallnacht read by Pitt students and a lecture by professor Robert Skloot (University of Wisconsin).

Lecture -- “The Late Style of Bandung Humanism”
Aamir Mufti
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Lecture -- “The History of the Novel and Empire in the Works of Edward Said and Georg Lukács”
Joseph N. Cleary
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Humanities Center

Monday, November 4th, 2013

Panel Discussion -- International Connections
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
WPU Kurtzman Room
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center, Study Abroad Office
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

College-bound minority students from Brashear High School learned about international studies and career opportunities through a panel session with Pitt study abroad returnees and breakout sessions with UCIS international studies advisors.

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Lecture -- Listening in on Europe
Dr. Hans Martens, The European Policy Centre
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, International Business Center
euce@pitt.edu

Dr. Martens is Chief Executive of The European Policy Centre, a Brussels-based think tank set up to promote European integration. He is the founder of Martens International Consulting, specializing in international consultancy and customized training for a number of major companies, and the author of a number of books and articles on European integration, monetary affairs, and business strategies for the European market. Questioning whether Europe finally has the Euro crises under control, Martens will also present his analysis of the future direction of European integration.

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Information Session -- Boren Awards for International Study Information Session
Michael Saffle, Boren Fellowship Program Manager
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
1228 Cathedral of Learning
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, Study Abroad Office
University Honors College
Judy Zang
jaz36@pitt.edu
http://borenawards.org/

Available for both undergraduates and graduate students, Boren Awards support the study of less-commonly-taught languages through study abroad. Applicants must demonstrate how their proposal and future goals are connected to a broad understanding of national security, and award winners must agree to a one-year government service requirement. The deadline for undergraduate applications in December 2nd.

Reception -- (Root) Biergarten
EUCE/ESC Staff
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
Steve Lund
euce@pitt.edu

Join the Center at the first of our country-themed social gatherings with a celebration of Oktoberfest! Enjoy music, rootbeer flights and pretzels, and get to know our Center Director, staff, and some of our affiliated faculty. Meet with other students interested in German and/or European Studies, and if you are a student who has traveled to Germany and would like to submit a photo from your travels, enter your favorite for a chance to win our photo contest. Please send your photo to euce@pitt.edu as an attachment prior to the event.

Lecture -- Sabor or Strasbourg? Croatian Political Parties and European Elections
Andrea Aldrich, PhD Candidate, Political Science
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Political Science
Free
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

This lecture will comment on the first European elections held in Croatia on April 14th, 2013. It will introduce the main issues debated in the public with respect to the elections and highlight the nature of political competition over Europe in Croatia. It will examine both the debate over the timing and purpose of the elections as well as the decisions made within the center-right and center-left Croatian political parties with respect to candidate selection. The lecture focuses mainly on the nature of debate over the role of the elections in the public realm, the status of the European Parliament office in Croatian politics, and the political goals of Croatian parties.

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- PIZZA & POLITICS: Decentralization, Interactive Governance and Income Inequality: Spain and Sweden"
Yasemin Irepoglu, PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

Irepoglu discusses her dissertation which combines the literatures of 'fiscal decentralization' and 'governance' in searching for determinants of income inequality. It argues that fiscal decentralization makes inequality more likely while the interactive nature of governance offsets this effect. Building on the author's earlier quantitative work, it compares findings from field work conducted in Spain –a country with low interactive governance-and in Sweden–a country with high interactive governance.

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Lecture -- "Sea and Land: On the Relationship between Disobedience and Sovereignty in Modern Political Thought."
Raffaele Laudani
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Humanities Center
humctr@pitt.edu
Conference -- Ebbs, Flows and Limits: Dialogues and Cultural Productions from the Periphery
9:00 am - 7:30 pm
Alumni Hall- Fifth Floor
Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures, Humanities Center, Katz Graduate School of Business-EMBA Worldwide and Center..., Office of the Provost

Paradigms and universal meta-discourses are in a state of crisis. In particular, theorists frequently question the efficacy that these discourses have on representation, specifically on the theoretical, symbolic and geopolitical levels. On a global scale, critics destabilize the Eurocentric theoretical-critical space as the center of culture, politics and history. To further disarticulate the centrality of European culture, it is necessary for academics to further expand the discursive space that allows for new correspondences surrounding southern flows of the Other within Latin America, Africa and Asia.

With an interdisciplinary approach, (Des)articulaciones 2013 “Ebbs, Flows and Limits: Dialogues and Cultural Productions from the Periphery” invites creative reflections on the possibility of many Others (and various Selves), and the examination of continuous cultural flows from and between so-called peripheries. Our purpose is to continue a reflection of Latin America vis-à-vis various contacts with peripheral Others and their epistemological relationship to the West, in acknowledgement of a radical heterogeneity.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Julio Ramos, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

Abstracts should focus on, but are not limited to, the following themes:
• Literature: Interregional, Trans-Atlantic and Trans-Pacific Dialogues
• Symbolic Representations from the Margin: Aesthetics and discourses from or beyond Latin American geopolitical limits
• Art, Cultural Production and Discourses via Peripheral Images (including cinema, photography and iconography)
• Other Epistemologies: Local/ localized knowledge in the face of “Universal” knowledge
• New negotiations of the Other: Genders and sexualities
• Diasporas and Afro-Descendent Cultures: Literature, Memories and Transnationalism
• Amerindian Studies in Dialogue: The Space between tradition and contemporaneity
• Constructions of Local/ Global Identities and Subjectivities
• Machines, War Devices, Violence and Political Conflicts
• New Cartographies, Decentralized Spaces
• Dispersion of the Periphery, Cultures and Literatures in Exile
• Memories, History and Socio-Polilitcal Narratives

Detailed instructions: http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/graduate/documents/instruction_sheet.pdf
Registration form: http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/graduate/documents/registration_form.pdf

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

Lecture -- The Evolution of EU Support in France: True Euroscepticism or Simple Volatility?”
Dr. Francesca Vassallo, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History and Political Science, University of Southern Maine
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Professor Vassallo’s research focuses on political behavior, French and European Union politics, and EU identity. In her lecture, she will highlight the possible solutions to declining EU support levels in other EU member states, addressing how European integration can still retain a mostly positive image in the eyes of elites and citizens in the EU when there is a clear commitment to the original integration project.

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Panel Discussion -- Conversations on Europe: Does Turkey Have a Future in Europe?
Various
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
European Union Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign • University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill...
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

The second of the EUCE's 2013-2014 interactive Conversations on Europe Virtual Roundtable Series. Turkey’s likely future and its relation to Europe can be seen in several dimensions. Probably best known and easiest to track is its long-running pursuit of membership in the European Union. But Turkey’s geographic and historic position has also drawn it into—and pushed it away from--the rapidly changing dynamics of the Middle East. It is one of NATO’s oldest members but has signed onto virtually all of Russia’s energy initiatives in the region. It is an enthusiastic diplomatic and economic entrepreneur in the Balkans but carries with it an Ottoman legacy that not everyone there welcomes. In addition, if Europe represents a mode of governance and norms of regime-society relations, where does Turkey lie along these dimensions of democracy and human rights protection? The unveiling of democratic reform packages must be seen against a background of widespread protests and fierce government response this past spring. Is the decade-long rule of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and the Law and Justice Party leading to a “European” future or something else? Panelists in this videoconference Conversation will be invited to address whichever aspect of this question they see as most compelling and attendees will be encouraged to participate.

Monday, October 21st, 2013

Information Session -- DAAD: German Academic Exchange Service Information Session
Dr. Katja Wezel, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
1228 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
University Honors College
Judy Zang
jaz36@pitt.edu

Learn more about DAAD programs for both undergraduates and graduates, and for German speaking and non-German speaking students. Dr. Wezel will discuss a variety of research, study, and internship DAAD scholarships that can fund up to 2 years of research or graduate study. For scholarship requirements and deadlines, please reference the DAAD’s website, which also includes information for the summer internship program with RISE (Research Internships in Science and Engineering). To R.S.V.P., please email Judy Zang at jaz36@pitt.edu.

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Lecture -- 2013 Nicholas C. Tucci Lecture: A Chick Takes Flight: Reflections on Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio
Michael Sherberg, Professor of Italian and Chair of the Department of Romance Languages
5:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning: G24
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French and Italian, Humanities Center, program in Children's Literature, program in Cultural Studies
Free.
savoia@pitt.edu

A pre-cursor to the dramatic story-telling of Carlo Collodi's "The Adventure of Pinocchio", Professor Sherberg’s offers a deeper narrative to what is often singularly considered to be a children's tale.

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Lecture -- European Human Rights for Commercial Lawyers
Nuala Mole
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Barco Law Building - Alcoa Room
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Center for International Legal Education

Nuala Mole is a human rights lawyer and advocate who has led two pro bono legal advice and advocacy organizations: Interrights and the AIRE Centre, which she founded. Mole initially specialized in immigration and asylum but now her work encompasses all aspects of international human rights law. Mole has conducted training for the Council of Europe, the European Commission and the AIRE Centre for judges, public officials, lawyers, and NGOs in over 40 of the 46 member states of the Council of Europe. In addition to training in Europe, Mole has worked extensively with judicial training in the Balkans.

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Lecture -- Desiring, Acknowledging, Struggling with, Mastering and Serving Hegel
Dr. Katrin Pahl, Associate Professor of German, Johns Hopkins University
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
5405 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
and the Humanities Center, Department of German, Philosophy Department, program in Cultural Studies
Free.
Holly Yanacek
hay22@pitt.edu

Professor Pahl will offer an additional colloquium that focuses on the emotionality of paragraphs 166 through 196 of Hegel’s "Phenomenology of Spirit". For more information or scans of these passages, please send an email requesting copies to grmndept@pitt.edu. Cookies and drinks will be provided.

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013

Lecture -- Kleist's Queer Humor
Dr. Katrin Pahl, Associate Professor of German, Johns Hopkins University
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of German, program in Cultural Studies, Program in Women's Studies, The Humanities Center
Holly Yanacek
hay22@pitt.edu

Professor Pahl approaches the German literary and philosophical canon from a queer-feminist perspective, with the arc of her research situated in affect and emotion studies. She edited the Modern Language Notes 2009 issue on Emotionality, and she was awarded the Best Article in Feminist Scholarship Prize from the Coalition of Women in German for “Transformative Translations: Cyrillizing and Queering.” In this lecture, Pahl will explore Heinrich von Kleist's “Anekdote aus dem letzten Kriege” (“Anecdote from the Recent War”). The lecture is in English. Copies of the anecdote in German and English will be provided.

Friday, October 4th, 2013

Information Session -- International Career Toolkit: Preparing For Graduate School
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Free
Susan Hicks
smhicks@pitt.edu

Are you considering a graduate degree related to international studies in the future? Please join us for an information session sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, as part of our International Career Toolkit Series. You’ll hear from current graduate students and professors, and discuss scholarship opportunities, how to make your application stand out, as well as the kind of research, skills, and experiences the most competitive schools are looking for in applicants.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Germany, Spain & the Euro Crisis
Dr. Eckart Woertz, Senior Researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Studies (CIDOB)
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
Free- please R.S.V.P.
euce@pitt.edu

A specialist of political and economic issues in Europe and the Middle East, Dr. Woertz manages CIDOB’s partnership with the Moroccan OCP Foundation. Formerly he was a visiting fellow at Princeton University, and Director of Economic Studies of the Gulf Research Center (GRC) in Dubai. He also worked for banks in Germany and the United Arab Emirates, and is a contributor and commentator to international and regional media outlets like the Financial Times, The National, and Al Arabiya. Author and editor of several publications, he holds an MA in Middle Eastern Studies and a PhD in Economics from Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg. LUNCH WILL BE SERVED. Please RSVP to euce@pitt.edu to confirm attendance.

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

Lecture -- Management and Culture in an Enlarged European Commission: Unity in Diversity?
Dr. Carolyn Ban
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
4217 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Enlargement posed a serious challenge for the European Commission, which set as a goal bringing on board thousands of new staff. How successful was the Commission in meeting this challenge? And how successful were the newcomers in integrating in to the organization? Now, after several years, can we see that the staff from Central and East European countries have had an impact on the organization? Answering these questions sheds new light on the evolution of the Commission’s organizational culture which Ban, author of the new book analyzing these questions, will discuss. LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. RSVPs to euce@pitt.edu appreciated.

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza & Politics: Inside the Brussels Complex
Rebecca Young, Julianne Norman, Yao Zhang
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
3800 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

The first of the EUCE/ESC's Pizza and Politics discussions of the year, GSPIA's EU and the World Organization's executive members talk about their experience interviewing policy-makers, EU civil servants, and visiting major institutions in Brussels and Luxembourg as participants in the EU in Brussels Program, co-sponsored by Pitt's EUCE/ESC and GSPIA. Also learn about getting involved in the EU and the World Organization and about other upcoming EU Studies opportunities at Pitt! PIZZA WILL BE SERVED.

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

Teacher Training/Workshop -- French Immersion
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Presentation -- Colloquium: Out of Place. Displacement, Modernism, and Prehistory in 19th Century Germany
Eric Downing (UNC) and John Lyon (Pitt)
5:00 pm
Humanities Center (602 Cathedral of Learning)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
English Department, Humanities Center, the German Department
Sabine von Dirke
vondirke@pitt.edu

This colloquium will highlight the research of John Lyon (Chair, Department of German), published in his second monograph "Out of Place. German Realism, Displacement and Modernity" (Bloomsbury, 2013) in conjunction with the scholarship of Eric Downing (Professor of German; Frank Borden and Barbara Lasater Hanes Distinguished Term Professor of English and Comparative Literature; Adjunct Professor of Classics, University of North Carolina). William Scott (Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh) will offer a response. Papers by Professors Lyon and Downing will be available for Pitt faculty and graduate students on the Humanities Center Colloquium server.

Panel Discussion -- Conversations on Europe: The German Elections
Various
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
European Union Centers of Excellence at the University of..., University of Texas - Austin, Urbana-Champaign; University of North Carolina - Chapel...
free
Allyson Delnore
624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

The first of the EUCE/ESC’s 2013-2014 interactive Conversations on Europe Virtual Roundtable Series will explore the outcomes and impact of the German Elections (which will take place the Sunday before). Experts on contemporary Germany will give their assessment of the results. Audience participation is encouraged. Presenters include Patrick Altdorfer, Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh; Myra Marx Ferree, Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Nils Ringe, Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison; David Crew, Department of History, University of Texas – Austin; Per Urlaub, Department of Germanic Studies, UT-Austin and Peter Rehberg, Department of Germanic Studies, UT-Austin. The moderator will be Dr. Steven E. Sokol, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

Lecture -- Celluloid Turn of Soviet Animation: Technology, Aesthetics and Politics
Olga Blackledge
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Communication
Free
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

After a decade of experiments with different techniques, in 1930s Soviet animation began a transformation to celluloid and aesthetics of social realism. However, interpretation of socialist realist aesthetic in animation turned out to be rather problematic, especially considering the influence of American animation, Disney in particular. The paper will look at the question of realism in animation, and will consider the attempts of Soviet critics and animation directors in 1930s to delineate socialist realism in animation, and to develop a type of image that could be considered consistent with the requirements of socialist realist aesthetics.

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Lecture -- Archaeological Evidence for the Origins of Christianity in Florence, Italy
Pitt Art Historian Franklin Toker
12:00 pm
Room 125, Auditorium in the Frick Fine Arts Building
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Art History
Sharon Blake
412-624-4364
blake@pitt.edu

Toker led excavations of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Italy from 1970-1974 and again in 1980, which led to discoveries about the tombs of the great Italian artists Giotto and Filippo Brunelleschi, as well as facts about Saint Ambrose, the Bishop of Milan. In light of his more recent discoveries, his lecture will focus on a horseshoe-shaped pool uncovered during the 1912 excavations under the Baptistery of St. John, which Toker has realized could be the archaeological remains of a place in which to hold a baptism, and therefore suggesting the archaeological evidence for the origin of Christianity in Florence. He is documenting his findings in a four-volume "Florence Duomo Project" being published by Brepols Publishers.

Friday, September 13th, 2013

Teacher Training--Area Studies -- Globalizing the Future
Multiple University of Pittsburgh Faculty Members
(All day)
Southern Polytechnic State University
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
Southern Polytechnic State University
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Lecture -- The Real Price of Cheap Food
Ms. Malin Olofsson, Transatlantic Media Fellow & Reporter for Sweden's National Radio Network
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Ms. Malin Olofsson is a Transatlantic Media Fellow (at the Center for Strategic & International Studies in D.C.) and a reporter for Sveriges Radio, Sweden’s national radio network. Malin's interests lie within the environment, climate change, and sustainability, and she plans to use her experience as an investigative reporter to talk about food production from a human rights and environmental perspective. She has won numerous national awards, most recently “The Great Journalism Prize of Sweden – 2011," and was listed in 2011 as one of the 100 most important people in Sweden in the discussion of environmental issues and the food debate. While in the United States, Malin plans to research how moves toward a more sustainable society will affect American transportation, with a particular focus on the oil debate.

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

Lecture -- Data-Starved, or How a Medievalist Became a Historian of Global Health
Monica H. Green (Visiting Scholar, World History Center)
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
3703 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
World History Center of the University of Pittsburgh
free
worldhis@pitt.edu

In a little over a decade, microbiologists have sequenced the genomes for all the major pathogens that cause human disease, information that allows them to reconstruct the phylogenies (“family trees”), and hence the histories, of these organisms. They have also, together with bioarcheologists, developed techniques for identifying the presence offragments of these pathogens in ancient remains. In other words, the investigative biomedical laboratory of the 19th century can now literally reach back into the distant past to tell us where specific pathogens were found and how they affected human populations in other ages. One irony of this cutting-edge, high-tech science is that it has placed the archetypically medieval diseases of plague and leprosy at the forefront of new methods to investigate the major diseases that have afflicted humans on every inhabited continent, in every period of human existence. Not simply plague and leprosy, but also tuberculosis, malaria, smallpox, syphilis, cholera, and even the most recent global scourge, HIV/AIDS, can all now be investigated historically by combining the disciplinary perspectives of molecular genetics, bioarcheology, and documentary-based historical analysis. But “history” itself needs to be defined now on a larger scale, one that can encompass the vast chronological depths of evolutionary time and the massive geographic breadths of human migrations around the world. This talk will recount my own personal journey in moving into and across these different fields over the course of the past decade, and my growing realization that it is indeed possible and also opportune to create a single interpretative framework for a global history of health.

Reception -- EUCE/ESC Welcome Back Reception!
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Please join the EUCE/ESC as we kick off the 2013-2014 school year with an opening reception. Come and meet faculty, staff, and fellow students, and learn more about the Center and our upcoming programs all while enjoying some European-themed refreshments.

Monday, August 5th, 2013

Teacher Training--Area Studies -- Human Rights and Cultural Diversity
(All day)
Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Midwest Institute for International & Intercultural...

Week-long professional development workshop on global human rights and cultural diversity for faculty from various Midwestern community colleges and small four-year colleges.

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag/Presentation -- European Identity: Concept, Crisis and Consequences
Branislav Radeljic, University of East London, UK
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
University Library Systems
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

In 1973, the European Community introduced the concept of European identity in order to define and strengthen its position vis-à-vis other countries, and in world politics more broadly. Over time, it has become clear that European identity has to do much more with the presence of European otherness and ‘Others’, such as Muslims in Western Europe. In his talk, Professor Radeljic will address the (ir)relevance of the European identity discourse for European national identities and members of European otherness. Moreover, he will outline a number of possible challenges to a European identity, posed by some recent policy choices as well as future of the European Union. Professor Radeljic visits Pitt as a recipient of the Summer Research Scholars Grant and is the author of Europe and the Collapse of Yugoslavia: The Role of Non-State Actors and European Diplomacy (London and New York: I.B. Tauris, 2012), and the editor of Europe and the Post-Yugoslav Space (Farnham: Ashgate, 2013) and Debating European Identity: Bright Ideas, Dim Prospects (Oxford: Peter Lang, forthcoming 2014). LUNCH will be provided.

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

Conference -- EU Global? The EU and Global Health Governance
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
University Club
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
UPMC
euce@pitt.edu

Organized in collaboration with Wulf Reiners of the Jean Monnet Chair for Political Science of the University of Cologne, the workshop will serve to bring together practitioners and academic scholars to discuss the collaboration of state and non-state actors, such as the European Union, as well as those from civil society, within the system of global health governance. Participants will include Bernard Merkel, European External Action Service, who works on Food Safety, Health and Consumer Affairs at the EU Delegation of the EU to the USA in Washington; Donald Burke, Dean, Graduate School of Public Health; Guy Peters, Department of Political Science; and Nidhi Bouri and Amesh Adalja, of UPMC Health Security.

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Presentation -- Europe Day Visit to Sunnyside Pre-K - 8
Kate Lewis & Rebecca Young
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

As a part of Europe Day celebrations, EUCE connected with Sunnyside Elementary. We presented information on the EU to two 6th grade classes.

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Presentation -- Europe Day Classroom Visit to Carlow Campus School Montessori PK3-K
Allyson Delnore
8:30 am - 9:30 am
Campus School of Carlow University
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Presentation to a Montessori mixed age classroom of 3-year-olds, 4-year-olds, and kindergarteners about the European Union - an introduction. The students were given individual "passports" and then pretended to visit Europe. They learned that they would only get one stamp when they got to Europe, no matter how many different countries they visited. The students are given regular instruction in the continents and could all name countries in Europe. They learned that some of those countries were member states, some were not. And then they learned about the euro and the different designs that appear on euro coins were compared to the different state's designs on U.S. quarters. They were able to hold and play with euro notes and coins.

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

Panel Discussion -- Good Neighbors, Bad Neighbors: How War and Conflict Change Us
Dan Simpson (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette), Jan Gross (Princeton), Anthony Novosel (University of Pittsburgh), Edward Orehek (Univeristy of Pittsburgh), Robert Szymczak (Penn State), Gregor Thum (University of Pittsburgh)
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Classrooms Without Borders, Jewish Studies Program, Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre, Polish Cultural Council
Free
Michelle Belan
mbelan@picttheatre.org

A continuation of the conversation begun by PICT Theatre's production of Tadeusz Slobodzianek's play Our Class,/i>, and featuring noted Princeton historian Dr. Jan T. Gross, whose book Neighbors inspired the play. Join us for a compelling discussion.

Haven't seen the play? Our Class runs through May 4th. Use code PANEL55 for Buy-One-Get-One-Free tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412-561-6000.

RSVP requested: https://picttheatre.secure.force.com/ticket/

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Conference -- The Changing Security Environment of the Black Sea
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Pittsburgh Athletic Association
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and the...
Eleni Valliant
env1@pitt.edu

In recent years, the area of the Black Sea region has seen several momentous changes, including: the emergence of several new states—some as a result of violent conflict; the appearance of a variety of governing systems, nominally based on democratic models but varying widely in terms of the practices of democracy; the end of the long-standing status quo of the Cold War with a resulting change of alliance patterns; and increasing prominence of a European, and Russian, energy highway. This conference will draw together experts from the United States and Europe to assess both the nature and impact of global changes on the Black Sea region and the responses of powerful international actors. A series of workshops sessions will cover, among other topics, the military, economic, ethnic-religious and energy dynamics of the Black Sea region and the strategic responses of the United States, European Union, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine. For more information, please email the EUCE/ESC at euce@pitt.edu or call 412-648-7405. More information, including a draft of the program, can be found on the EUCE/ESC website.

Repeats every day until Fri May 03 2013 .
Monday, April 29th, 2013

Seminar -- Faculty Seminar: Science, Culture, and the Human after World War II
Priscilla Wald (Duke)
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
Ms. Tory Konecny
vad16@pitt.edu

Science, Culture, and the Human after World War II

The definition of the human is always in flux. Science offers no absolute account of “human nature”; even the species definition can be contested. The idea of human rights has faltered not only on what counts as rights and who can enforce them, but also on who is entitled to them: on who counts as “human.” Despite the instability of its definition, the human has long been a foundational term for theories of social justice. What happens, then, when scientific innovations and geopolitical transformations conspicuously challenge the definition of the human? These seminars will focus on the scientific and technological innovations and the geopolitical transformations in the decades following the World War II.

Political theorists as diverse as Hannah Arendt and Frantz Fanon decried the failure of the concept of human rights and called for new formulations of the human. At the same time, the biologist Rachel Carson cautioned of the contamination and exhaustion of natural resources endangering life on a planetary scale. The genre of science fiction proliferated in this period as it engaged with the scientific innovations and geopolitical transformations that placed the idea of the human in question. The narratives emerging from these works, philosophical and fictional, offer insight into a politics and poetics of life that continue to structure twenty-first debates about science and politics; they will be the subject of this seminar.

In these seminars, we will consider a broad range of works, across genres, media, and cultures. We will explore connections among concepts such as “human rights” and the changing idea of “human being” as it emerged through scientific research especially in fields renovated (or generated) by the war, such as genetics, cybernetics, and psychoanalysis. We will consider how the effort to come to terms with the unthinkable in a variety of arenas gave rise not only to new anxieties about the future (and accompanying recasting of the past), but also to new ways of thinking about the connections among artistic expression, cultural criticism, freedom, and human possibility.
Readings may include works by such authors as Paul Celan, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Hannah Arendt, Antonin Artaud, Erwin Schrödinger, Norbert Wiener, John Hersey, Rachel Carson, Johan Galtung, Stokely Carmichael, Martin Luther King, Octavia Butler and such films as Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Manchurian Candidate, and Blade Runner.

*Please register by e-mailing: Ms. Tory Konecny vad16@pitt.edu.*
**followed by lunch for participants**

Friday, April 26th, 2013

Award Ceremony -- European Union Center of Excellence/ West European Studies Certificate Graduation Ceremony
Ronald Linden (EUCE/ESC Director)
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pittsburgh Athletic Association
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
free

The EUCE/ESC will hold a ceremony during graduation weekend to recognize its undergraduate and graduate recipients of the European Union or West European Studies Certificate Program. A reception will follow for family and friends of the Center in the Pittsburgh Athletic Association.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Linguistics Undergraduate Research Poster Session
Ranem Atia, Felicia Grasso, Mara Katz, Anisa Mughal, Jessica Packer, Spencer Onuffer
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 208B
European Studies Center
Department of Linguistics
Sally Kim
sjk70@pitt.edu

*Undergraduate Directed Research*

Felicia Grasso (with Jody Garcia):
Jody's work centers on language contact and historical language change. My work with
Jody’s research included translating a number of texts in different dialects of German
to English. I took a look at translation theory, the issues that have arisen over the years
in translation. I gave a sample of specific issues I ran into when translating dialects and
outdated German texts into English, and show how I chose to face these issues. I show
my work was heavily influenced by Nida's concept of equivalence through the translation
of poetry. Nida argues that “one of the most essential, and yet often neglected, elements
is the expressive factor, for people must also feel as well as understand what is said.” In
my translation of works from Heine and others, I have experienced the same struggle in
expressing emotion of the original author, felt when read in the source text.

Mara Katz:
My research involves historical analysis of Somali Bantu Kizigua, an underdocumented language from the Bantu family spoken by members of the Somali refugee community in Pittsburgh. I am documenting the morphosyntactic structures of the language, with the goal of creating a teachable grammar, as well as performing comparative historical analysis to determine how much the language differs from related languages as well
as earlier forms of itself.

Anisa Mughal (with Nausica Marcos):
Syntactic awareness (SA) is the knowledge of a word category without necessarily knowing what the word itself means (Kieffer & Lesaux, 2012). SA is an attribute of derivational morphology that reflects a second language learner’s knowledge of how affixes of words change the meaning of a word (Kieffer & Lesaux). Testing for SA was conducted with 225 English-speaking L2 learners of Spanish at different proficiency levels. These learners completed an SA task that tested knowledge of Spanish nouns, adjectives and verbs. Preliminary results support the hypothesis that SA increases with proficiency.

"Not All Clauses are Created Equal: Classifying Complexity in ESL Speech"
Jessica Packer (with Mary Lou Vercellotti):
“Complex language” has been defined as language which utilizes a diverse range of
structures. This conceptualization presents complexity as one means of gauging language
proficiency over time. In the past, SLA researchers have combined finite and non-finite clauses when reporting on structural complexity. Within such coding systems, finite clauses and non- finite clauses with a complement or adjunct were considered equal as “clauses,” where complexity could then be gauged in global terms (words per sentence), by subordination (clauses per sentence), and subphrasally (words per clause). This classification schema has presented with weaknesses in its ability to gauge proficiency level in language learns. Thus, it has been proposed that it is likely obscuring the multi-faceted nature of structural complexity. On this basis, this research proposes a new classification scheme which recognizes the following: independent clauses, conjunctive verb phrase clauses, subordinate clauses, complementizer clauses, and relative clauses. These new classifications are derived from theoretical literature on clause acquisition and also from English language instruction curriculum material. The classification scheme is applied to production data taken from L2 instructed English learners over real time and the frequencies of learners’ production of these clauses over time are considered in order to characterize the development of complexity.

"An Analysis of Minimum Pause Durations"
Spencer Onuffer (with Mary Lou Vercellotti):
This study hopes to determine the most efficient and accurate measures of fluency and pause. It uses thirteen minimum pause lengths one data set to create a comparison of the same results using different measures. This data may be able to determine if there is a specific pause length at which a pause is no longer the same type of pause: for example if there is a notable difference between a short and long pause it will determine at what length a pause becomes long. The data will also be used to determine what measures are most affected by the different minimum pause lengths. The data will also be used to display the results in terms of trade-off effects using mean length of fluent run and mean length of utterance to display if the data can display a relation between complexity accuracy and fluency. "

Friday, April 19th, 2013

Symposium -- Student Symposium: The Living and the Dead
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Visual Media Workshop, 116 Frick Fine Arts Building
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

This is an interdisciplinary seminar, drawing students from art history, films studies, anthropology, and creative writing, which has investigated the role of death and mortality in the formation and transformation of culture. The course is organized around the new constellation structure of HAA, focusing on the conceptual frameworks of agency, identity, and mobility/exchange.

Twelve students will be presenting their research on topics spanning the ancient world to the present, Asia to Europe to the U.S. The atmosphere will be informal and students will be available concurrently, four at any given time, to discuss their research. Each of them will have the chance to give a short "TED talk" of 8 to 10 minutes at least twice during their round, leaving ample time for discussion with those who drop by.

Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Panel Discussion -- Sharing the Wealth: And EU-US Free Trade Agreement
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
In collaboration with the American Council on Germany and..., The EUCE at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, The EUCE at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
euce@pitt.edu

In February President Obama announced the beginning of negotiations designed to produce a US-EU Free Trade Agreement. Mutual tariffs are already low and trade high; business and labor constituents seem supportive, and officials are eager to conclude this agreement “on one tank of gas,” i.e., quickly. But significant issues will be in play, including: opening markets for agriculture products, trade in services, and access to public contracts. Regulation and non-tariff barriers-including, for example, “cultural exceptions” favored by some European countries and American restrictions on European airlines may constitute substantial obstacles. More broadly, supporters of more global approaches to trade fear the impact of such an exclusive bilateral deal on the emerging and less developed markets. Our Conversation on Europe will cover these and other related issues, with participants from several venues and input from university and community people.

Ambassador (ret.) J.D. Bindenagel is a special Advisor to the President at DePaul University in Chicago.
Martin Staniland is a Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh.
David Cleeton is a Professor of Economics at Illinois State University.
Zaki Laïdi is a Professor and the Director of Research at Sciences Po in Paris, France.
Ben Beachy is Research Director with Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch.

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- A Window into the Making of Architectural History in Great Britain (1800-1850)
Courtney Skipton Long (HAA)
12:00 pm
Room 203 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture

This presentation is offered as an introduction to Courtney Long’s dissertation, “Re-Categorizing Great Britain's Medieval Architecture: A Lesson in Nineteenth-Century Visual Taxonomy.” Courtney’s project seeks to investigate the ways in which architectural historians and natural scientists conveyed the process of change over time in textual and graphic observations published between 1800 and 1850. In her talk, Courtney will focus on the numerous attempts made by nineteenth-century British architects, historians, and theorists to systematically describe and illustrate the history of medieval ecclesiastical architecture in Great Britain. Examining pictures and diagrams found in a select work of published books by Thomas Rickman, John Britton, Edmund Sharpe, and John Ruskin, this presentation seeks to analyze the nineteenth-century attempts to codify British Architectural History and to structure knowledge graphically.

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

Workshop -- French Immersion
8:30 am - 1:30 pm
European Studies Center
$20

French Immersion Workshop for primary and secondary school teachers.

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Lecture -- The External Dimension of the EU's Immigration Policy: The Case Study of Turkey
Dr. Ayselin Goze Yildiz
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
4625 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

The presentation aims to analyse the external dimension of the EU’s immigration policy and its implications for Turkey as a transit country. It tries to demonstrate the development and institutionalization of the EU’s externalization of its immigration policy within a theoretical context. Applying the theoretical debate
concerning “Europeanization beyond EU borders”, it investigates to what extent the EU has successfully externalised its immigration policy to Turkey, and what kind of intended and unintended impacts this has had on Turkey's migration management. It tries to explore both the successes and limits of the Europeanization of Turkey’s domestic immigration policy by benchmarking progress in the harmonization of legal contexts, border management, visa policies, readmission agreements and asylum policies.

Symposium -- "Europe: East and West" Undergraduate Research Symposium 2013
(All day)
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, International Business Center
Gina Peirce
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities in the region with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus.

Collage

After the initial submission of papers, selected participants are grouped into panels according to their research topics. The participants then give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

2013 Dates:

Students submit a 250-300 word abstract and their entire paper, postmarked by January 28, 2013, using the downloadable application form on this site.
Selected students notified by mid-February 2013.
Final revised papers due by March 20, 2013.
Presentations made at the Symposium on April 12, 2013.

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

Lecture -- Peoples' Poetry/Peoples' History
Martin Espada, Marcus Rediker (History)
7:30 pm
TBA
European Studies Center
Department of History, The Humanities Center
Marcus Rediker
red1@pitt.edu

*A conversation with poet Martin Espada and historian Marcus Rediker

How movements from below create and use poetry and history.

Lecture -- A Tale of Three Hagia Sophias: Conversion, Museumification, Contestation
Tuğba Tanyeri-Erdemir, Lecturer at the Graduate Program of Middle Eastern & Eurasian Studies, Middle East Technical University
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Department of Anthropology
Free
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

The Hagia Sophias of Istanbul, Iznik, and Trabzon shared similar conversion histories. All three were built as Byzantine churches, converted into mosques under the rule of the Ottoman Empire, and functioned as museums in the 20th century. Transforming such emotionally charged spaces, either into buildings reserved for the practices of another religion or into public museums open for visitation, requires major physical and conceptual changes, which are closely related to the political, historical and social contexts in which they take place, and are deeply embedded in long-term contestation over these sites. In this talk, Professor Tanyeri-Erdemir focuses on the debates around the museumification and de-museumification of these emotionally charged buildings, analyzing the historical, political, social, religious, and institutional factors in the manifestation of major structural and conceptual changes related to the museumification and de-museumification practices.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: On Being Wrong About Children
Marah Gubar (English)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center

On British children's literature.

With responses by Karl Schafer (Philosophy) and Stuart Hammond (Psychology).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- PIZZA & POLITICS: Home in Europe: Transgressing Borders and Genres in Current German Road Films
Yvonne Franke
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

Historically, we have understood home and travel as antitheses: to travel is to be away from home. What happens when home becomes travel, when the difference between home and travel is sublated? Franke's paper explores the contemporary tropes of home and travel in German film as they transform under the influences of Europeanization and globalization. Images of home, offering a sense of belonging have always been crucial to representations of identity. In the wake of well-analyzed displacements brought about by globalization, one can observe the transformations of images of home and a concomitant increased search for identity as a central motif of significant German films in the past 20 years. With respect to the European idea, it has simply become more complicated to draw rigid borderlines on the European map, and accordingly, between genres in European national cinema as well. Awarded an EU Dissertation Fellowship by the European Union Center of Excellence in the Summer of 2012, Franke's paper discusses selected German road films that visualize socio-political transformations in Europe from a German or cross-cultural perspective.
PIZZA WILL BE SERVED.

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Lecture -- Chary Opportunists: Money, Values, and Change in Postsocial Romania
Narcis Tulbure, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology
11:30 am - 1:00 pm
3106 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Anthropology
Free
Presentation -- The Genres of Europeanization – Moving Towards the New Heimatfilm
Yvonne Franke (German)
10:00 am
Cathedral of Learning, Room 1218
European Studies Center
Department of German
Alana Dunn
alanad@pitt.edu

Dissertation Defense, open to the public

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

Seminar -- The Economic Impact Of Social Ties: Evidence From German Reunification
Tarek Hassan (Chicago)
3:00 pm
4716 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center
Department of Economics
Debra Ann Ziolkowski
daz1@pitt.edu

Abstract

We use the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 to show that personal relationships which
individuals maintain for non-economic reasons can be an important determinant of regional
economic growth. We show that West German households who have social ties to East
Germany in 1989 experience a persistent rise in their personal incomes after the fall of
the Berlin Wall. Moreover, the presence of these households significantly affects economic
performance at the regional level: it increases the returns to entrepreneurial activity, the
share of households who become entrepreneurs, and the likelihood that firms based within
a given West German region invest in East Germany. As a result, West German regions
which (for idiosyncratic reasons) have a high concentration of households with social ties
to the East exhibit substantially higher growth in income per capita in the early 1990s. A
one standard deviation rise in the share of households with social ties to East Germany in
1989 is associated with a 4.7 percentage point rise in income per capita over six years. We
interpret our findings as evidence of a causal link between social ties and regional economic
development.

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Conference -- Conference on Global Humanities and World History
April 5, 2013 Friday 10:00 am – 2:15 pm.
10:00 am - 2:15 pm
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture, Department of Music, The Humanities Center, World History Center
Katie Jones
joneskh@pitt.edu

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

Symposium -- Applied Modernism: Living in the Now
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, 4400 Forbes Avenue
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

*See the file below for abstracts*
**RSVP requested**

PROGRAM

First Session | 1:30 – 3:00
Welcome and Introduction
Drew Armstrong + Mrinalini Rajagopalan
Architectural Studies Program
University of Pittsburgh

Diego Rivera and the ‘Building’ of Mexican Identity
Patricia Morgado
North Carolina State University

Generalizing Away Uniqueness: James Stirling's Interrogation of the Oxbridge Courtyard
Amanda Reeser Lawrence
Northeastern University

Coffee Break

Second Session | 3:30-5:00
Pittsburgh’s Chatham Village: The Enduring Relevance of a Housing Revolution that Wasn’t
Angelique Bamberg
University of Pittsburgh

Housing for Spatial Justice: The Women's Development Corporation of Providence, Rhode Island
Ipek Türeli
McGill University

Discussion and Closing Remarks

Discussion and Closing Remarks

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: Surrealism in Romania and France Before, During and After World War II
Irina Livezeanu (History)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center

With responses by Barbara McCloskey (History of Art and Architecture) and David Pettersen (French).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Seminar -- Print, Piety, and the Rise of Early Modern Vernacular
John King (Ohio State University)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron (English)
jwaldron@pitt.edu

Our work on this topic seeks to bridge the divide between medieval and early modern studies by taking a long view of three questions surrounding particular uses of vernacular languages and broader processes of vernacularization in this period: How did changes in technologies of communication, such as the rise of letterpress printing, intersect with the uses of vernacular languages? How were the structures of "vernacular theology" transfigured during the period leading up to and following the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation? And how does a focus on vernacularization help us to reevaluate theories and practices of translation-whether from one language to another, from one medium to another, or from one cultural sphere to another?

John King is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University. He is the author of numerous books, including the following:
English Reformation Literature: The Tudor Origins of the Protestant Tradition; Tudor Royal Iconography: Literature and Art in an Age of Religious Crisis; Spenser's Poetry and the Reformation Tradition; Milton and Religious Controversy: Satire and Polemic in Paradise Lost; Foxe's Book of Martyr's and Early Modern Print Culture. He is the recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among many others.

This event is part of a yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues,” organized by the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh and supported by a collaborative research grant from the University of Pittsburgh’s Humanities Center.

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Lecture -- The Reformation of the Book: Vernacular and Vernacularization
John King (Ohio State University)
4:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron (English)
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

Our work on this topic seeks to bridge the divide between medieval and early modern studies by taking a long view of three questions surrounding particular uses of vernacular languages and broader processes of vernacularization in this period: How did changes in technologies of communication, such as the rise of letterpress printing, intersect with the uses of vernacular languages? How were the structures of "vernacular theology" transfigured during the period leading up to and following the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation? And how does a focus on vernacularization help us to reevaluate theories and practices of translation-whether from one language to another, from one medium to another, or from one cultural sphere to another?

John King is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University. He is the author of numerous books, including the following:
English Reformation Literature: The Tudor Origins of the Protestant Tradition; Tudor Royal Iconography: Literature and Art in an Age of Religious Crisis; Spenser's Poetry and the Reformation Tradition; Milton and Religious Controversy: Satire and Polemic in Paradise Lost; Foxe's Book of Martyr's and Early Modern Print Culture. He is the recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among many others.

This event is part of a yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues,” organized by the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh and supported by a collaborative research grant from the University of Pittsburgh’s Humanities Center.

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Lecture -- Le Mépris (Jean-Luc Godard 1963) and its story of cinema: a ‘fabric of quotations’
Laura Mulvey (Uni of London)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 324
European Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Film Studies Program, The Humanities Center, Women's Studies Program
Jamie Hamilton
jlh231@pitt.edu

Laura Mulvey is Professor of Film and Media Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London. She has written extensively on film and film theory. Her books include Fetishism and Curiosity (1996), Death Twenty-four Times a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image (2006), Experimental British Television (edited with Jamie Sexton, 2007), and Visual and Other Pleasures (2nd edition, 2009). She has co-directed films, including Riddles of the Sphinx (1978) and Frida Kahlo and Tina Malatti (1980), as well as the documentary Disgraced Monuments (1996).

*Reception to follow*

Lecture -- Passions and Portraits: Thoughts on Rembrandt, Van Dyck, and the History of Taste
STEPHANIE DICKEY (Queen's University)
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 202
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program
Jennifer Waldron (English)
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

Among the Baroque paintings held in the Royal Collection in London are two works from the early modern Netherlands: the Dutch artist Rembrandt van Rijn's Portrait of the Shipbuilder Jan Rijcksen and his Wife Griet Jans, 1633, and the Flemish artist Anthony van Dyck's Cupid and Psyche, 1640. At first glance, these paintings could not look more different, yet they have more in common than at first appears. Close analysis reveals how these paintings encapsulate the competitive relationship between two gifted artists, the tensions between tradition and modernity that characterized their age, and the essential significance of emotion in the visual language of the Baroque.

*Dr. Stephanie S. Dickey is the Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art at Queen's University

Lecture -- Supplementing Lenin: Toward a Communism of Other-determination
Nergis Ertürk, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Penn State University
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
boundary 2, Department of Film Studies
Free

Nergis Ertürk is the author of Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey (Oxford University Press, 2011), the recipient of the 2012 MLA Prize for a First Book. In 2008, she won the William Riley Parker Prize for her essay, "Modernity and Its Fallen Languages: Tanpınar's Hasret, Benjamin's Melancholy," which appeared in PMLA. Her article, “Phonocentrism and Literary Modernity in Turkey,” appeared in boundary 2, and her research has also appeared in a wide-ranging collection of prominent literary works.

Lecture/Reception -- For the Glory of Greece: Looking Forward by Looking Back
Her Excellency Mrs. Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2500 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Nationality Rooms
American-Hellenic Foundation of Western Pennsylvania
Eleni Valliant
env1@pitt.edu

Mrs. Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki was elected Member of Parliament of the Greek Republic in 1989 and was re-elected the following year. In 1998, the Republic of Greece appointed her Ambassador-at-Large for her service leading Greece’s successful bid to host the 2004 Olympic Games. Two years later, she was asked to assume the presidency of the ATHENS 2004 Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games, which was at the time behind schedule and over-budget. Under her leadership, Athens gave the world what IOC President Jacques Rogge called: "an unforgettable, dream Games." Today, Ambassador Angelopoulos-Daskalaki is an active member of the Clinton Global Initiative and Vice-Chairman of the Dean's Council for Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Her book, My Greek Drama: Life, Love and One Woman's Olympic Effort to Bring Glory to her Country, will be published in May. A reception in honor of Her Excellency Ambassador Angelopoulos-Daskalaki will be held immediately following the talk. REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED. PUBLIC IS WELCOME.

Lecture -- Cross-Border Networks as a Source of Regulatory Change in the EU's Eastern Neighborhood
Evgeny Postnikov
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Anna Talone
crees@pitt.edu

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

Lecture -- Making Prussia Polish. Changing Land and People in Poland’s New Territories, 1945–1960
Katharina Matro, PhD Candidate, Stanford University
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3702 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Department of History
Free

Katharina Matro’s dissertation and talk focuses on the transformation of the vast estates of Prussia’s nobility into Polish state farms and smaller family farmsteads post-1945 and the defeat of Nazi Germany. Her research forms the argument that the continual assault on both land and property rights during the time determined the fragile postwar economy and society in the region.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: Gervase, Edmer, and the Gestalt of Canterbury Cathedral
Karen Webb (HAA)
12:00 pm
Room 203 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

Few architectural tracts remain from the medieval period in the west. Two tracts on architecture that this paper utilizes from this period—one by Gervase in 1185, and one by Edmer in 1116—both discuss subjects that collectively include the fire, building, and arrangement of different architectural campaigns at Canterbury Cathedral. Here, these texts are used to trace the written knowledge of the succession of churches—those of Lanfranc, Anselm, William of Sens, and William the Englishman, the last of whose termination of the cathedral remains intact today. Viewing these buildings as a united set of statements, this paper proposes that they interlink in purpose and in conception. While scholars like Richard Krautheimer and Günter Bandmann have suggested there is a possible link between architectural form and conceptual or philosophical meaning, there has been much doubt about this connection by scholars like Paul Crossley. In the course of this paper, the idea of an iconography of architecture and even an iconography of architectural tools are explored in a direct challenge to Crossley’s work by using Gervase and Edmer to establish a line of intention in planning and meaning. While Crossley states that “Even if style can . . . be derived from thought, the character of the gothic cathedral, the sources of its totality, cannot be traced back to some single ‘intention.’” This paper maintains that the complete set of buildings from at least that of Anselm (1090 – 1130) that come-and-go on the site of Canterbury Cathedral form a Gestalt, or a planned intentional set of parts that create a whole originary vision. This vision reproduces a set of parallel architectural types comparable to the styles of the visual figurative arts like idealism, naturalism, stylization, abstraction, and non-representation and paralleled in the text of Isidore of Seville’s Etymologies. In this presentation, the explication of idealism in architecture is the primary objective and its theological relationship to what this study relates to Christian representation and Jewish representation.

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Information Session -- International Toolkit Series: National Scholarships: Fulbright
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Career Development and Placement Assistance Office
Free
Susan Hicks
smhicks@pitt.edu

Hear about opportunities to teach English or conduct research abroad through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Fulbright alumni and current Fulbright participants will join representatives from the university’s National Scholarships advising office to provide information on the Fulbright experience and how to best prepare for it.

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Lecture -- Medieval Song from Head to Tail
ANNA ZAYARUZNAYA (Princeton)
4:00 pm
Music Building Room 132
European Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Department of French and Italian, Department of Music, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

From the heads and tails of individual notes to the foreheads and feet of song stanzas, medieval musical writings are replete with body parts. Sometimes the terms are used by convention, or in the service of simple mnemonics. But in other cases, the reasons for acts of musical anthropomorphization are less clear. Tracing the rhetoric of musical animation from the treatises into the realm of musica practica can give us fresh insight into some of the best-known songs of the later middle ages. Beyond this, the rhetoric of songs alive offers a useful alternative to the “work concept”—a musical ontology whose applicability before the Renaissance has been repeatedly called into question. The “creature concept” of song can serve as a powerful (if whimsical) tool for describing and analyzing musical things that are perishable but autonomous, subject to change and growth, and capable of doing work in the world.

Anna Zayaruznaya, an Assistant Professor of Music at Princeton University, is interested in the relationship between music and its texts in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Her research brings the history of musical form and notation into dialogue with medieval literary theory, the history of ideas, and iconographic and codicological trends. Recent papers and publications have focused on the motets of Guillaume de Machaut and Philippe de Vitry, Milanese chant, Isorhythm, and musical resonances in the poetry of John Gower and Jean Molinet. Currently she is working on a book that explores the roles played by the monstrous and hybrid in fourteenth-century musical aesthetics.

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Lecture -- Why Wagner?: Some Thoughts on the Occasion of his Bicentennial
Nicholas Vazsonyi (South Carolina)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Carnegie Mellon University Department of Modern Languages, Cultural Studies Program, Department of German, The Humanities Center
vad16@pitt.edu

Nicholas Vazsonyi is Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of South Carolina and the editor of the Cambridge Wagner Encyclopedia (forthcoming 2013), an international effort involving some 80 scholars from 11 academic disciplines and residing in 9 countries. He teaches and researches on German literature and culture, including music and film, covering the 18th through the 21st centuries. He has published monographs on Wagner and on Goethe, and edited volumes on Wagner’s Meistersinger and on German national identity from 1750 to 1871.

Lecture -- Comparing the European Parliament with the US Congress: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges
Selma Bendjaballah, Sciences Po
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Allyson Delnore
624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

Comparing Legislatures implies numerous challenges to capture the complexity of democratic logics playing in these institutions, especially when these legislative bodies are embedded in institutional settings and present features that are seen as unique or exceptional. This talk aims at presenting a specific reading of comparative legislative research on two exceptional Legislatures, namely the European Parliament and the US Congress. Dr. Bendjaballah will retrace what has been done in this field, the research questions that have been raised, and the epistemological and methodological challenges that have emerged as well.

Selma Bendjaballah is a research manager at the Centre for European Studies at Sciences Po in Paris, from where she also received her Ph.D. in Political Science. Dr. Bendjaballah specializes in comparative politics with an emphasis on legislatures (standing committees) and party systems of the European Union, individual countries within Europe, and the American Congress. She has published numerous articles in such journals as Politique européenne and a special issue, forthcoming, of the International Review of Comparative Politics. Her book, Introduction to Legislative Studies, co-authored with Olivier Rozenberg and Anne-Laure Beaussier, will appear in print this year.

Film -- Carnegie Mellon University's International Film Festival 2013: Faces of Media
(All day)
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Jolanta Lion
jola@cmu.edu
http://www.cmu.edu/faces/

"Whoever controls the media, controls the mind." - Jim Morrison

The Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival, sponsored by the Humanities Center, is proud to present its 2013 theme, Faces of Media. From March 21st - April 13th, audiences will have the opportunity to enjoy Pittsburgh premiere screenings of over a dozen brand new and award-winning films from Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, France, Denmark, Norway, Romania, Austria, Finland, Spain, Poland, the Ukraine, the Congo, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Japan, China, Australia, Canada, and the United States. All films are presented in English or with English subtitles.

From the young protestors in Egypt who utilized social media apps like Facebook to mobilize a revolution to an American community in the near future that maintains social contact through constant live video feeds on individual home computers, the compelling real-life and fictional faces introduced by these films will provoke thoughtful questions about how our global media impacts society and vice versa. Contemporary issues concerning the societal effects of rapid globalized media development, such as violence, (in)justice, identity transformation, voyeurism, obsession, networking, and alienation, will be highlighted in the films through the unique constructs of language, imagery, and narrative.

We are thrilled to introduce you to powerful films from around the globe that we believe are extraordinarily unique and relevant to our time. Even in the digital age where we can access almost anything with the click of a mouse, these rare new releases are not yet available to stream online. Beyond the screenings themselves, audiences may continue to explore the complex and multifarious themes of these films at our events by participating in Q&A sessions with international directors, viewing interactive performances by student artists, and tasting delicious global cuisine from local eateries.

Whether you are fluent in all things related to new media or prefer to observe the constantly changing technology trends from a distance, the 2013 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival: Faces of Media will provide you with the perfect chance to learn more about our evolving world of globalized communication through a cinematic lens. We look forward to seeing your faces in the audience!

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Lecture -- Patterns of Vernacular Affectivity in Late Medieval and Protestant England
Barbara Rosenwein (Loyola)
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron (English)
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

If the purpose of "Speaking in Tongues" is to bridge the divide between medieval and early modern studies, then one issue that must be faced is whether there was a great change in emotions or affectivity from one period to the other. Certainly the prevailing thesis, hanging on the coattails of Norbert Elias's Civilizing Process, is that there was a great change--and it can be summed up as the transition from medieval emotionality to modern restraint.

In this paper, I take issue with that thesis by looking specifically at one form of emotionality, "affective piety." I argue that affective piety, as exemplified by Margery Kempe, continued to some degree, at least among some groups, even in the Protestant world. My focus is on the testimonials of the members of a mid-17th century "gathered church""-that is, a Puritan church-near London. Both Margery and the Puritans wrote in the vernacular, though of course that vernacular changed over time. Thus my exploration is indeed about "speaking in tongues. " I shall conclude with the thought that there are more continuities between medieval and early modern religious emotions than most historians have admitted.

Barbara H. Rosenwein is Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago. She has been at the forefront of research on the history of emotions, editing Anger's Past: The Social Uses of an Emotion in the Middle Ages (Cornell, 1998), and authoring Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages (Cornell, 2006). This talk is from a current project on the history of emotions from late antiquity to about 1700.

This event is part of a yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues,” organized by the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh and supported by a collaborative research grant from the University of Pittsburgh’s Humanities Center. Our work on this topic seeks to bridge the divide between medieval and early modern studies by taking a long view of three questions surrounding particular uses of vernacular languages and broader processes of vernacularization in this period:

How did changes in technologies of communication, such as the rise of letterpress printing, intersect with the uses of vernacular languages?
How were the structures of "vernacular theology" transfigured during the period leading up to and following the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation?
And how does a focus on vernacularization help us to reevaluate theories and practices of translation-whether from one language to another, from one medium to another, or from one cultural sphere to another?

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Silencing Machine: Peter Roehr’s Film Montages as Queer Disavowal
Meredith North (HAA)
12:00 pm
Room 203 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture

This paper analyzes the 1965 Film Montages of the West German artist Peter Roehr. Roehr’s untitled Film Montages of American and European commercial advertisements utilized an explicitly mechanical aesthetic to remove removed any personal identification, political impetus, or artistic qualities from the montages. Such an extreme disavowal of subjectivity through the cold objective logic of mechanical precision indicated that these montages could, and should, be understood in two other ways: as Roehr’s purposeful self-silencing, and as critiques of commodity fetishization. As my paper proposes, Roehr’s silencing machine aesthetic arises from a particularly queer perspective that gives access to alternative modes of social critique and political purpose.

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Symposium -- Northern Ireland's Lost Opportunity
Tony Novosel (History)
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3703 WWPH - History Lounge
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History

*Part of the History Department's Book Symposia Series*

Featuring commentary by:
Billy Hutchinson (Progressive Unionist Party, Northern Ireland)
David Miller (CMU)
Peter Shirlow (Queen's University-Belfast)

Saturday, March 16th, 2013

Teacher Training--Language -- French Immersion
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

Conference -- EuroChallenge
(All day)
PAA
European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association

What is the Euro Challenge?

The Euro Challenge is an exciting educational opportunity for high school students to learn about the European Union (EU) and the euro. Student teams of three to five students are asked to make presentations answering specific questions about the European economy and the single currency, the euro. They are also asked to pick one member country of the “euro area” (the 17 EU member countries that have adopted the euro so far), to examine an economic problem at the country level, and to identify policies for responding to that problem.

In 2013, its eighth year, the Euro Challenge will continue to expand nationally, with more than 100 teams from various regions in the United States expected to compete for monetary awards generously provided by The Moody’s Foundation.

The Euro Challenge is a program launched by the Delegation of the European Union to the United States in partnership with The Moody’s Foundation and with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York serving as program advisor. The program is supported by Credit Suisse, the University of North Carolina, Florida International University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Illinois, the University of Texas at Austin, Rutgers University, George Washington University, Indiana University, the University of Wisconsin, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, the DC World Affairs Council, the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland (Pittsburgh Branch), the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Detroit Branch.

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Lecture -- Metamorphosis at the Mughal Court: The Case of the Diana Automaton
Jessica Keating (Southern California)
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Room 202 Frick Fine Art
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

This paper considers how a seventeenth-century German Automaton featuring the Roman Goddess Diana atop a stag made its way to the court of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir (1569-1627), and it explores this object's social life outside of its putative home of the Holy Roman Empire.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: Figuring out Europe: Nation, State and the European Union in the German Public Sphere
Russell Berman (Stanford)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Cultural Studies Program, Department of German, The Humanities Center
Alana Dunn
412-624-5909
alanad@pitt.edu

With responses by Nancy Condee (Global Studies), Alberta Sbragia (Political Science) and Gregor Thum (History).

Russell Berman is Director of German Studies at Stanford, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Editor of TELOS,
and recent President of the Modern Language Association. He is an expert on German literature and culture and
on cultural relations between Europe and the United States, and is a pioneer in German Cultural Studies.
In more than 80 articles and five books, he has written widely on modern German and European literature and politics,
as well as on issues in contemporary cultural theory

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Seminar -- Graduate Seminar
Russell Berman (Stanford)
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of German
John Lyon
jblyon@pitt.edu

Graduate Seminar building on Prof. Berman's talk "Figuring out Europe: Nation, State and the European Union in the German Public Sphere"

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

Lecture -- Is the Ivory Tower an Iron Cage? Why We Need to Reform Humanities Education
Russell Berman (Stanford University)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Department of German, The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Humanities Center
Alana Dunn
412-624-5909
alanad@pitt.edu

Russell Berman is Director of German Studies at Stanford, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Editor of TELOS,
and recent President of the Modern Language Association. He is an expert on German literature and culture and
on cultural relations between Europe and the United States, and is a pioneer in German Cultural Studies.
In more than 80 articles and five books, he has written widely on modern German and European literature and politics,
as well as on issues in contemporary cultural theory.

Seminar -- Graduate Seminar
Russell Berman (Stanford)
(All day)
European Studies Center
Department of German
John Lyon
jblyon@pitt.edu

Graduate Seminar building on Prof. Berman's talk Is the Ivory Tower an Iron Cage? Why We Need to Reform Humanities Education

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Lecture -- Mughal Occidentalism: Rethinking Artistic Encounters Between Europe and Asia at the Mughal Courts of India
Mika Natif (Harvard)
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Room 202 Frick Fine Art
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

Since the reign of Emperor Akbar the Great (d. 1605), paintings produced in Mughal India began to evince responses from Mughal artists to European art. This lecture centers on the phenomenon of what I term “Mughal Occidentalism,” namely the trans-global style and visual expression that Mughal artists and patrons developed following the meeting of Indian painting with Renaissance art; the use of European pictorial techniques by Muslim and Hindu artists; and the transformation of Christian visual culture into an Indian idiom. By analyzing visual and textual evidence, I examine these works of art from the perspective of the Mughals, and observe how Mughal artists were recontextualizing Western motifs and creating their own vernacular/cosmopolitan aesthetics. This synthesis of European and Indo-Persian pictorial traditions became the hallmark of the Mughal painting style.

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Lecture -- Titian's Painted Stones: Slate, Oil and the Transubstantiation of Painting
Christopher J. Nygren (Penn)
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Room 202 Frick Fine Art
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture
Natalie Swabb
njs21@pitt.edu

Titian’s Ecce Homo and Mater Dolorosa with Open Hand (both Madrid, Museo del Prado) stand out for a number of reasons. Firstly, they were not commissioned but were done as gifts, so they reflect Titian’s artistic volition rather than the will of a patron. Secondly, the materials that Titian chose to use demand attention: the Ecce Homo is painted on slate while the Mater dolorosa is painted on a slab of marble. Depending on how scholars account for problems of attribution, workshop participation, and works that have not survived, estimates of Titian’s artistic production range from about 400 works on the conservative side to more than 600. Despite these large numbers (not matched by other masters of his period like Raphael and Michelangelo), the Ecce Homo and Mater Dolorosa are the only paintings that Titian ever painted on non-traditional supports. Their outlier status, then, is clear and should make them of interest to scholars. Yet modern scholarship has essentially ignored Titian’s selection of artistic materials. This paper will examine Titian’s redeployment of the novel technique of stone painting by focusing on how the painter sought to heighten the affective immediacy of Christian devotion by drawing on the complex associations between the spiritual content of his images and the physical characteristics of their material substrates.

*Christopher J. Nygren is a Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania

Conference -- 8th Annual Graduate Student Conference on the EU
various
9:00 am
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
EUSA
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

The University of Pittsburgh hosts the Eighth Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union, featuring Alexandre Stutzmann, Diplomatic Adviser to the President of European Parliament, as the keynote speaker. All panel sessions, including the keynote address, are open to the public and will be held in the Patrician Crown Mural Room of the Pittsburgh Athletic Association. For a full listing of panels and a schedule of public events, please visit the EUCE/ESC web page featuring the schedule of the program.

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Lecture -- Provost's Inaugural Lecture - Civil War in the British Empire: America’s Violent Birth
Holger Hoock (History)
4:00 pm
2500 and 2501 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center
Office of the Provost, The Eighteenth Century Studies Program, The History Department

*As part of the Provost's Inaugural Lecture Series, Holger Hoock will deliver an Inaugural Lecture as J. Carroll Amundson Professor of British History.

Pitt hosts the oldest chair in British History in the United States, endowed half a century ago this academic year.
In this talk, as a part of the Provost’s Inaugural Lecture series, Holger Hoock will discuss work in progress on
violence in the American Revolutionary War as a civil war in the British Empire and in America. Most modern
histories focus on the Revolution’s ideals and tend to marginalize the physical and psychological ordeals it
entailed for so many participants. Reflecting on the geopolitical and cultural contexts of that historiographical
marginalization of violence since the late nineteenth century, Hoock will consider how we might write violence
back into the story, and to what effect. British History has long lost the special status it once enjoyed in the
American academy. Its continuing relevance will depend on how it positions itself in relation to European,
Atlantic, and wider transnational contexts. All faculty and students are most welcome. The lecture will be
followed by a reception.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: The Origin of Rhyme
Roberto Dainotto (Duke)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
vad16@pitt.edu

A focus on Europe with responses by Neil Doshi (French), Randall Halle (German) and Ronald Judy (English).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Lecture -- WHO ARE THESE GERMANS?
Susanne Ortner-Roberts (German), Fritz Ottenheimer
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 208B
European Studies Center
Department of German
Alana Dunn
alanad@pitt.edu

In music and words, two Germans from different generations reflect on the Holocaust, German history, and what it means to be German in the 21st century.

*A discussion/question and answer period will follow the talk*

ABOUT THE PERFORMERS

FRITZ OTTENHEIMER, as a Jewish boy growing up in Nazi Germany, escaped Nazi persecution by immigrating to the U.S. in 1939, and eventually fighting against Germany with the U.S. Army at the end of WWII. A retired engineer, Mr. Ottenheimer has documented his experiences surrounding the Holocaust and Post-War Germany in a memoir, “Escape and Return.” He resides in Pittsburgh, PA.

SUSANNE ORTNER-ROBERTS is a world-renowned clarinetist from Augsburg, Germany, who specializes in Jewish (Klezmer) music. As a representative of a new generation of Germans, she is committed to using words and music to promote cross-cultural understanding, and to educate others about how young Germans today deal with the atrocities of war and the Holocaust committed by their grandparents’ generation. She is the subject of the recent book “Living the Dream – Für die Musik nach Amerika” written by German Television journalist Helge Fuhst. Susanne also teaches German at the University of Pittsburgh.

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Lecture -- History and the Novel
Roberto Dainotto (Duke)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
vad16@pitt.edu

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Lecture/Reception -- Engendering Italy: Gaps, Contradictions, & Paradoxes of Gender on the EU Background
Giuseppina Pellegrino, Visiting Italian Fulbright Scholar
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4165 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
env1@pitt.edu

The lecture aims to reflect on how gender relationships and femininity are represented, depicted, and performed in contemporary Italy. Such a reflection is linked to the peculiarity of the Italian mediascape from a political and cultural viewpoint, and has direct consequences on political life and women’s movements. In this respect, the talk offers an overview of Italian society through the lens of gender and resistance to the influence of the media in monopolizing the evolution of women’s representations and identity in the country. From another perspective, this Italian viewpoint is framed and contextualized against the backdrop of the EU, as a driving force of change and a site of both quantitative and qualitative comparison for gender representation, equality, and domestic violence. A reception in honor of Visiting Italian Fulbright will be held immediately after the lecture. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Lecture -- Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln: An Unexpected Convergence
Robin Blackburn (University of Essex)
7:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Department of History, The Humanities Center, The World History Center
Marcus Rediker
(412) 648-7477
marcusrediker@yahoo.com

The XIXth Annual E.P. Thompson Memorial Lecture

Robin Blackburn is Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex. He was educated at Oxford University and the London School of Economics and served as editor of New Left Review. He is author of many important books, including an influential trilogy on origins and history of Atlantic slavery: The Overthrow of Colonial Slavery, 1776-1848 (1988), The Making of New World Slavery: From the Baroque to the Modern, 1492-1800 (1997), and The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights (2011).

Presentation -- New Security Concerns in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Role of the EU
Marina Skordeli, Director of the Jean Monnet Center of Excellence at the University of Athens
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
env1@pitt.edu

The Eastern Mediterranean has long suffered from a complex security setting, which is made up of both traditional security challenges as well as asymmetric threats. More recently, we started to witness the additional effect of a couple of new challenges, which have set in motion a rebalancing of powers in the region and may threaten its stability even further: the Arab Spring and the recent offshore energy findings. These developments can affect US and European interests in multiple ways and, therefore, the EU, in coordination with Washington, should take on a pivotal role in addressing them. Dr. Skordeli previously held the role of Senior Political Advisor to the former Prime Minister of Greece, Kostas Karamanlis.

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Lecture -- The Subaltern, Again and Again
Gayatri Spivak (Columbia)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
The Humanities Center
Arjuna Parakrama
arjuna@pitt.edu

Professor Spivak’s talk (and Q&A) will engage with some of the key issues confronting the western historical and intellectual tradition, especially as they relate to post-colonialism and gender.

Reception -- Coffee with a Visiting Scholar
Marina Skordeli (University of Athens)
2:30 pm
Panera, Oakland
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Marina Skordeli is the Director of the Jean Monnet Center at the University of Athens). Come for an informal discussion about her work and your interests.

Presentation/Reception -- Russia and its Neighbors: Challenges and Opportunities of a Eurasian Power
Major Steven P. Melvin
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Alcoa Room, School of Law
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
AFROTC Detachment 730, The Matthew B. Ridgeway Center
Das200@pitt.edu

Major Steven P. Melvin entered the Air Force in 1999 as a graduate of the United States Air Force Academy, and assumed the duties of United States Assistant Air Attache to Russia in 2012. After completing initial qualification training in missile operations, he was assigned to Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, where he served in various roles as an intercontinental ballistic missile combat crew operator. In 2004, the major joined the 527th Space Aggressor Squadron, Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, where he trained forces to mitigate adversary tactics and capabilities for space-based systems. He was then selected for the International Affairs Specialist’s newly created Regional Postgraduate School for studies in national security affairs, followed by language training at the Defense Language Institute. Upon graduation, he was transferred to the Air Force Secretariat for International Relations and assigned the duties of Country Director for seven former Soviet Union countries.

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Presentation -- Conversations on Europe Videoconference: "NATO: A Hammer in Search of a Nail"
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
env1@pitt.edu

With its post-Cold War role in Europe behind it, an end to its role in Afghanistan planned for 2014, and new challenges in the Arab world, NATO is at yet another turning point in searching for a new role. This conversation will focus on what that role might be and how it relates to the security perspectives (broadly conceived) of the United States and its European allies. Faculty participants include Marina Skordeli, Director of the Jean Monnet Center at The University of Athens; Taylor Seybolt, Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, The University of Pittsburgh; Ryan Hendrickson, Professor of Political Science, Eastern Illinois University; and Gulnur Aybet, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Kent.

Monday, February 18th, 2013

Lecture -- European Crisis?
Richard Wainwright, Visiting Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Law
5:00 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for Legal Education
Free unless attending for PA CLE Board Credit.
412-648-7023
cile@pitt.edu

As a part of the Jean Monnet Lecture on European Union Law, Professor Wainwright’s lecture will center on the economic and political problems that currently face the European Union, and will examine a possible scenario for recovery. On the economic front, EU countries are faced with high indebtedness, high unemployment, and low growth. Politically, Eurozone countries are committed to closer economic union, while the present United Kingdom government is seeding a renegotiation of its treaty ties with the EU—with the possibility that it might exit if the renegotiation is unsuccessful. Professor Wainwright has worked for more than 30 years with the European Commission’s Legal Service, including serving as the former director and head of competition policy. He has also served on the staff of Transport Commissioner Stanley Clinton Davis and as director for internal market issues in the Legal Service. Refreshments and a light dinner will be provided. This program has also been approved by the PA Continuing Legal Education Board for 1 hour of substantive credit. For more information, please call 412-648-7023 or email cile@pitt.edu.

Lecture -- ‘We Carried Your Secrets:’ One Man’s Experience of Reconciliation in Northern Ireland
Jon McCourt, Peace Activist and Community Organizer
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4500 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Department of History
Free
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu
http://vimeo.com/42328879

Jon McCourt has been a community Peace Activist and a member of the Peace and Reconciliation Group in the City of Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland for over 30 years. As a young man he went on the first Civil Rights March in Derry in October 1968. He has been actively engaged in almost every aspect of the conflict that arose as the result of that march. He was involved in the events that have come to be known as Bloody Sunday when British soldiers clashed with civil rights protestors January 30, 1972. Since 1978 he has worked at building bridges between the two major communities in Derry, encouraging and engaging in cross community activities that have assisted in rebuilding contact, trust, and cooperation across the city. With others he founded and established the first Victim Support Service in Northern Ireland in 1986.

In this talk, Mr. McCourt will discuss his participation in the moving and ground-breaking "Theatre of Witness" production, "We Carried your Secrets" (www.theatreofwitness.org). To view a documentary about the project, visit http://vimeo.com/42328879.

Lecture -- Shakespeare's Two Antonios: Language, Stage History, and the History of Sexuality
MARIANNE NOVY (English)
12:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
European Studies Center
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

Shakespeare's plays Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night both contain men named Antonio who speak of their love for another male character. Both Antonios remain single at the ends of their plays while both of the men they love marry women. Recent critics often see homosexual desire in the Antonios, and productions today often emphasize their exclusion from the comic community. Some have argued, however, that these views lack historical awareness, whether because the Antonios exemplify the conventions of ideal friendship, or because the early modern period might have accepted their forms of same-sex desire. However, one Antonio could also be considered an outsider because he is a melancholy character in a comedy, and the other because he is arrested and called a pirate. This paper considers the possible outsider or insider status of these characters in relation to the characters' language and stage history and the history of sexuality.

This talk is derived from Professor Novy's book Shakespeare and Outsiders, forthcoming from Oxford University Press in June. The talk will introduce a few of the issues to be discussed in her new fall graduate course, Shakespeare, Gender, and Sexuality.

Friday, February 15th, 2013

Lecture -- Making Waves: Democratic Contention in Europe & Latin America Since 1848
Kurt Weyland (UT Austin)
2:30 pm
WWPH 4500
European Studies Center
Department of Political Science
Scott Morgenstern
smorgens@pitt.edu

Kurt has written widely about democratization and methodological themes. He also has had a recent article in PS about the tenure process.

Presentation -- The EU's Response to the Eurozone Crisis: Deeper Integration & Closer Transatlantic Ties
Klaus Welle, Secretary General of the European Parliament
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
The Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins...
env1@pitt.edu

The Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University will be hosting the Secretary General of the European Parliament, Klaus Welle, and will be videoconferencing with numerous schools throughout the United States for a discussion on the Eurozone Crisis, and its effects on Europe and Europe’s international relationships.

Conference -- Model EU Undergraduate
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: What were Jewish Books in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries?
Adam Shear (Humanities Center)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center

Reflections about Johannes Reuchlin, Some Notaries, and Some Learned Jews. With responses by Ryan McDermott (English) and Ron Zboray (Communication).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Lecture -- U.S. And European Relations in the Second Obama Administration
Ron Linden (Poli Sci)
10:30 am
Levy Hall, Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Rodef Shalom Brotherhood

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Seminar -- Translation Seminar
Lawrence Venuti (Temple)
2:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
cbove@pitt.edu

Dr. Venuti will give a seminar focusing on different ways of thinking about translation, using theory and examples of translations between English and other languages. He will focus on particular texts and ways to teach them, again, to students without strong second language skills. Amani Attia (Arabic Coordinator), Lina Insana (Associate Professor of Italian), and Gina Peirce (Assistant Director of Russian and East European Studies) will also speak at this workshop.

For seminar materials, contact: Carol M. Bové.

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Lecture -- Translation, Intertextuality, Interpretation
Lawrence Venuti (Temple)
4:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
Carol Bove (English)
(412) 624-6506
cbove@pitt.edu

Prof. Venuti will give an overview of literary translation including the ways in which a translated text offers a set of relations, a form of intertextuality, analogous to the set offered by the source text. He will discuss particular strategies one might use with undergraduates and beginning graduate students who often lack advanced knowledge of a second language, for instance two English versions of the same source text. There will be ample opportunity for discussion.

Saturday, February 9th, 2013

Workshop -- Workshop: Non-Traditional Approaches to International Affairs
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Center for Interpretative and Qualitative Research (..., Department of Political Science, McAnulty School of Liberal Arts (Duquesne), Philosophy Department (Duquesne), The Humanities Center
Leslie Marshall (Political Science), Nathan Eckstrand
leslie.marshall21@gmail.com, eckstrand@duq.edu

Organizer: The Marginal Theory Society

*Anyone is welcome to attend any of the presentations.*

Marginal Theory Workshop: "Non-Traditional Approaches to International
Relations"

Schedule of events:

Saturday, February 9th

9:45-10:00 - Introduction

10:00-10:30 - First Speaker - Dr. Daniel Lieberfeld - (Duquesne - Social
and Public Policy) - "Leadership and Post-conflict Reconciliation"

10:30-11:00 - Q and A

11:00-11:15 - mini-break

11:15-11:45 - Second Speaker - Dr. Robert Cavalier (CMU - Philosophy) -
"Toward a More Deliberative Democracy - Here and Abroad"

11:45-12:15 - Q and A

12:15-1:30 - long break

1:30-2:00 - Third Speaker - Katharina Nieswandt (Pitt - Philosophy) - "In
What Sense are Rights Conventional?"

2:00-2:30 - Q and A

2:30-2:45 - mini break

2:45-3:15 - Fourth Speaker - Leslie Marshall (Pitt - Political Science) -
"Economic Rights and Social Equality in Autocratic Regimes"

3:15-3:45 - Q and A

3:45-4:00 - mini break

4:00-4:30 - Fifth Speaker - Corinne Ogrodnik (Pitt - Sociology) -
"Transnational Peasant Politics and the 2008 Global Food Price Crisis"

4:30-5:00 - Q and A

5:00-6:00 - Reception

Friday, February 8th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Scottish English: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of TH-fronting, social meaning and social identity
Robert Lawson (Birmingham City University)
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room G-8
European Studies Center
Department of Linguistics
Sally Kim
sjk70@pitt.edu

As a relatively new phenomenon in the phonology of Scottish English, TH-fronting has surprised sociolinguists by its rapid spread in the urban heartlands of Scotland. While attempts have been made to understand and model the influence of lexical effects, media effects and frequency effects, far less understood is the role of social identity. Using data collected as part of an ethnographic study of a high school in the south side of Glasgow, Scotland, this talk addresses this gap in the literature by considering how variants of (θ) are patterned across three adolescent male Communities of Practice. Drawing on recent work on linguistic variation and social meaning (Eckert 2000), the article explores some of the social meanings of (θ), particularly those variants which previous research has reported as being associated with ‘toughness’ in Scottish English.

Lecture -- The Desert Room: From Michelangelo Antonioni to New Media
DOMIETTA TORLASCO (Minnesota)
12:00 pm
501 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center
Film Studies Program
David Pettersen
412-624-6564
dpetter@pitt.edu

Domietta Torlasco works at the intersection of film theory and practice and is currently an Associate Professor
of French, Italian, and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University, where she is also affiliated with the
Screen Cultures Program. She is the author of The Time of the Crime: Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, Italian
Film (Stanford University Press, 2008) and the digital film Antigone’s Noir (2008-09). Her second book, The
Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film is forthcoming with University of Minnesota Press in
2013.

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

Career Counselling/Information Session -- Internships and Career Opportunities at the Department of State
Patricia Guy, State Department Diplomat in Residence
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
3911 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
slund@pitt.edu

Patricia Guy, a Diplomat in Residence for the State Department, will visit the University of Pittsburgh to talk about the State Department’s internship program, and will provide information and answer questions about careers and job possibilities with the Department of state.

Presentation -- Figuring out Europe: Nation, State and the European Union in the German Public Sphere
Russell Berman, Stanford University
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
the Cultural Studies Program, the Department of German, The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Humanities Center

Responses will be offered by Nancy Condee (Global Studies), Alberta Sbragia (Political Science), and Gregor Thum (History)

Presentation -- "In the Center of Europe, But on the Fringe?"
Claudia Fritsche, Ambassador of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the U.S.
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

Claudia Fritsche, Ambassador of Liechtenstein to the United States, joined the Office for Foreign Affairs of the Principality of Liechtenstein on June 1st, 1978 and served in a variety of diplomatic functions. Ambassador Fritsche assumed her duties as the first resident Ambassador of Liechtenstein in Washington at the beginning of October 2002 after leaving her post in New York, where she had served as the Permanent Representative of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the United Nations from 1990 to 2002. Ambassador Fritsche will discuss the unique position of Liechtenstein, a small country that lies in the heart of Europe but that is not a member state of the European Union.

TO ATTEND, PLEASE REGISTER BY EMAILING: adelnore@pitt.edu. Lunch will be served.

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

Presentation -- "Shale Gas in Poland and Europe"
Dimiter Kenarov, Pulitzer Center Fellow
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

Mr. Dimiter Kenarov will present a lecture that focuses on shale gas in Poland and Europe which will be live videoconferenced with the European Union Center of Excellence at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Presentation -- "Shale Gas: From Poland to Pennsylvania"
Dimiter Kenarov, Pulitzer Center Fellow
7:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

“Shale Gas: From Poland to Pennsylvania” – Based upon his new project forthcoming that focuses on a commodity called “a game changer", promoted as a cleaner fossil alternative to coal and oil and cheered as the next step toward the American dream of energy independence. Poland is now Europe's center of shale gas. Like Pennsylvania, it embraces the promises and dangers of extraction. At the center of debate: hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and an associated largely unexplored question of global politics.
Dimiter Kenarov is a freelance journalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, and a contributing editor at the Virginia Quarterly Review. His work has also appeared in Esquire, Outside, The Nation, the International Herald Tribune, and others, and has been twice anthologized in "The Best American Travel Writing."

Lecture -- Toward a Theory of Narrative: Excuses and Moral Reasoning
Fritz Breithaupt (Indiana)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Department of German, The Humanities Center

Abstract:

Story-telling is ubiquitous, ranging from fiction to gossip, but what exactly is the core structure of narrative? This talk will propose that narrative thinking takes place when we consider alternative versions of an event – and make excuses. Based on this suggestion, the talk provides an overview of this theory of narrative and ends with a speculation about the connection of narrative and moral reasoning.

Fritz Breithaupt is professor of Germanic Studies, adjunct professor in Comparative Literature, and affiliated professor of Cognitive Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has published four books, co-edited four volumes, and has published about 40 full-length articles. His latest books provide humanities responses to work in cognitive science, addressing issues of empathy, narrative thinking, and moral reasoning. His work on Goethe and the romantics, as well as on European literature and philosophy since 1740 is ongoing. Currently, he is writing a book on the connection of narrative thinking and moral reasoning, as well as an English follow-up to his work on empathy, The Dark Sides of Empathy. He has received many honors and distinctions for his work, including an Alexander-von-Humboldt Fellowship, and was the first Distinguished Remak Scholar at Indiana University in 2008-09. He writes frequently for the German press, especially "Die Zeit" and "Zeit Campus."

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Lecture -- Fantasies of Absolutism in Gold and Jewels: A Global History Object Lesson From Early Modern Germany
Dror Wahrman (Indiana)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of German, The Humanities Center

*Part of the visit of short-term fellow Dror Wahrman

With responses by Molly Warsh (History) and Adam Shear (Religious Studies).

Presentation -- "US-European Cooperation" U.S. Department of State Videoconference
Amy Westling, Deputy Director of the Office of European Union and Regional Affairs
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
3431 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

As President Obama’s second term commences, the continued vitality of America’s oldest alliance remains critical, as seen by recent speculation about a US-EU free trade agreement. Simultaneously, Europe itself is in the midst of change, as its eastward expanding borders force a reassessment of European and EU identity. Ms. Amy Westling, Deputy Director of the Office of European Union and Regional Affairs, joins us from the US Department of State to discuss the continued importance and current initiatives of the evolving transatlantic partnership.

Performance -- John Gabriel Borkman
Quantum Theatre
(All day)
Hart Building in East Liberty: 6022 Broad Street
European Studies Center
$17-$48
412.362.1713

Disgraced and destitute following a fraud scandal and imprisonment, John Gabriel Borkman paces alone in an attic room, a nightmare to those below. Downstairs his wife and former mistress--who happens to be her sister--are in for a dark and stormy night. A scorching indictment of 19th-century capitalism, Ibsen's play could be ripped from today's headlines. JGB provides a tour-de-force for three mature actors and a cautionary message for modern audiences about how unbridled lust for money and power can make you crazy.
Discounted tickets for students ($17) and faculty ($30).
Wednesdays-Saturday at 8 PM, Sunday at 7 PM

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

Lecture -- The Early Modern Media Revolution: An Artist’s Perspective
Dror Wahrman (Indiana)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center

Talk on new media in 17th century England.

Presentation -- POSTPONED: "(Re)Localizing the Welfare State: Multi-leveled Rural Development Policy and Cultural Memory in Wales"
Dr. William Russell Schumann III, Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

An author of several books posing an anthropological perspective on government, political labor, and power, Professor Schumann will offer an argument for the Welsh, UK, and EU development hierarchies, and how the organizational cultures of Welsh rural authorities shape local interpretations and administrations of UK/EU development policies. The discussion will be framed in terms of analyzing civil-state relations in a changing Wales, UK, and Europe. Following the talk Dr. Schumann will welcome questions from the audience.

Friday, January 25th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- The Effects of Correcting Pronunciation of Second Language Learners
Maritza Nemoga (Linguistics)
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room G-8
European Studies Center
Department of Linguistics

Master's Thesis Defense:

Since the implementation of the communicative approaches in the 1970s, pronunciation in second language instruction has been overlooked. Recent research has proven pronunciation instruction and corrective feedback to be beneficial for students’ second language pronunciation. The purpose of this study was to analyze which correction method, between self-correction and explicit correction, was more effective at improving students’ pronunciation of the Spanish sounds [x] 'j' and -ø- 'h' in word-initial position. A pre-test was conducted in two groups of 18 students taking Spanish II at a private Midwestern college. The participants received instruction and models of how to pronounce words with the studied sounds. For the next seven weeks, one of the two groups used the explicit correction method and the other one used self-correction. A week before the end of the semester the post-test was conducted. A two-way ANOVA analysis served to examine the effects of the two correction methods. The findings have pedagogical implications and will show that the self-correction method benefited students’ pronunciation more.

Lecture -- International Financial Rescues in Europe and Beyond
Christina Schneider (UC-San Diego)
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
WWPH 4500
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Political Science

Abstract:

Why do governments provide bilateral bailouts to countries that experience
financial crises above and beyond what the IMF provides? We argue that
governments face a trade off. On one hand, they have incentives to rescue a crisis
country because they want to prevent the spread of the crisis to their own country.
On the other hand, governments experience pressures from domestic constituents
who are oftentimes opposed to financial rescues. Politicians aim to balance these
countervailing pressures. Whereas they are more likely to provide financial support
when their country’s economy is closely integrated with the crisis country’s economy,
elections may have a detrimental effect on the likelihood of a financial rescue,
particularly if the home country’s economy is not doing well itself. We test our
hypotheses using a new data set on international financial rescues by OECD countries
between 1990 and 2010. Our statistical analysis finds robust support for the
importance of domestic economic and political factors in international cooperation
during financial crises.

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Lecture -- Openings and Closings in Video-based Computer-mediated Communication
Marta Tecedor Cabrero (Iowa)
2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning 204
European Studies Center
Department of Linguistics

This presentation explores how beginning learners of Spanish perform opening and closing sequences during two videoconferencing exchanges. Data were analyzed using Conversation Analysis and several patterns of interaction were identified. Discussion will focus on description of these interactional patterns and on pedagogical implications.

Marta Tecedor Cabrero, candidate for the Spanish Lecturer/Coordinator position will be on campus January 23rd and 24th.

Ms. Tecedor Cabero is a PHD candidate in Second Language Acquisition, Specialization: Technology at the University of Iowa. Her teaching interests focus on computer-based language learning and instruction, language teaching methods Spanish grammar, Spanish conversation, Spanish language courses (beginning to advanced, intensive, accelerated).

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza and Politics: Pomak Identifications across the Greek, Bulgarian, and Turkish Borders
Cengiz Haksoz, Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4625 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

Cengiz Haksoz, a graduate student in the Anthropology Department at Pitt, will present a portion of his dissertation, which focuses on transnational identity formation. Pizza and Politics is the EUCE/ESC’s monthly graduate student speaker forum focusing on European and European Union Studies. For more information, contact Allyson Delnore at adelnore@pitt.edu. PIZZA WILL BE SERVED.

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Seminar -- Getting Parents Involved: A Field Experiment in Deprived Schools
Nina Guyon (Paris School of Economics)
3:30 pm
4716 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Economics

Paper abstract

This paper provides novel evidence on the causal effect of parents’ involvement at school on
pupils’ cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Furthermore, it shows how the impact of more
involved parents on their children is amplified at the class level by peer group interaction. We
build on a large scale controlled experiment run in a French deprived educational district,
where parents of middle-school children were invited to participate in a low-cost program of
parent-school meetings on how to get better involved in their children’s education. At the end
of the school-year, we find that treated families have increased their school- and home-based
involvement activities. In turn, pupils of treatment classes have developed more positive
behavior and attitudes in school, and received better marks from their teachers. In particular,
truancy and disciplinary sanctions are reduced by more than 20% in treatment classes. Our
results suggest that improving parents’ involvement in their children’s education can
represent a highly cost-effective input in the human capital production technology.

Sponsored by: Applied Microeconomics Recruiting Seminar

Download Seminar Materials: http://www.ewi-ssl.pitt.edu/econ/files/seminars/130118_sem_Nina%20Guyon.pdf

Presentation -- Conversations on Europe Videoconference: "Croatia"
EUCE/ESC Director Ron Linden, Moderator; REES Director Robert Hayden and Associate Director Andrew Konitzer, Presenters
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
env1@pitt.edu

The EUCE/ESC, in cooperation with the Center for Russian and East European History (REES) will host the next in our ongoing series of virtual roundtables on the subject of Croatia’s impending accession as the 28th member state of the European Union. The title of the video conference is “The Next Member State: Croatia’s Path to the European Union”. REES Associate Director Andrew Konitzer will moderate. REES Center Director Robert Hayden will join other distinguished panelists from Europe and other EUCEs throughout the U.S. in a discussion of the Europeanization process in the western Balkans, the impact on Croatia (and on the EU) of enlargement, and related topics. Audience participation is welcome.

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- The Impossible Films of Vera, Countess of Cathcart
Mark Lynn Anderson (Film Studies)
5:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 1228
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Film Studies Program
David Pettersen or Jennifer Florian
412-624-6564
dpetter@pitt.edu, jrf16@pitt.edu

Mark Lynn Anderson is an associate professor of Film Studies in the Department of English at the University of Pittsburgh. He is interested in the relations between media institutions and radical democracy, and has published essays on star scandals, media censorship, and early film education. His forthcoming book, Twilight of the Idols, examines the relations between early Hollywood stardom and the human sciences.

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Information Session -- International Career ToolKit Series: Working or Volunteering Abroad after Graduation
Recent Pitt Alumni and local Peace Corp representative
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Elaine Linn
412 648-2113
eel58@pitt.edu

Many graduate programs want students to gain "real world" experience before enrolling in their respective programs. This session will help students plan out how and where to work or volunteer abroad. Recent Pitt alumni with experience working in India, El Salvador, Ecuador and Cape Verde will share their stories and how best connect with their organizations, and Pitt staff will have resources on hand to help you to secure overseas experience. Jonnett Maurer, the Peace Corp field based recruiter will also be there to answer questions. Next month (Feb 21, 2013) watch for Teaching English Abroad, as part of the International Career Toolkit Series.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pulpit, Politics and Pathos: Protestant Rhetoric and the National Socialist Revolution
Professor Angela Dienhart Hancock, Assistant Professor of Homiletics and Worship, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
2628 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center
The Religious Studies Department
Free.
relgst@pitt.edu

Professor Hancock’s research interests have been primarily focused on the intersections made between theology, politics, and rhetoric. In this Brown Bag Lunch Colloquium Series, she examines how the dominant political rhetoric at the end of the Weimar years infiltrates the language of the church, questioning what factors influenced the mix of gospel and Germanness.

Friday, December 7th, 2012

Presentation -- Tradition and Deconstruction
Dr. Philipp Rosemann
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Duquesne University
European Studies Center
Department of Classics, Department of English, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean for..., Duquesne Universitys Center for the Catholic Intellectual..., Humanities Center, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, National Institute for Newman Studies
Free.
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

Dr. Rosemann will examine the relationship between the Christian intellectual tradition and the postmodern deconstructionist approach. Arguing that although tradition and deconstruction may appear inimical, he will present a case for why they imply and require each other. Dr. Rosemann's talk will take the form of a dialogue between texts by the Belgian Denis the Carthusian, the great 15th-century theologian who lived in Germany, and Martin Heidegger, the German philosopher whose reflections on Destruktion in Being and Time remain seminal for the deconstructionist method.

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Presentation -- Vernacularity and Alienation
Dr. Philipp Rosemann
4:30 pm
European Studies Center
Department of Classics, Department of English, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean for..., Duquesne University’s Center for the Catholic Intellectual..., Humanities Center, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, National Institute for Newman Studies
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

A native German trained in Ireland and Belgium, and now working in the U.S., Professor Rosemann has written academic work in German, French, and English, and has reflected deeply on the linguistic and cultural impacts of colonialism while teaching in Uganda. During this presentation he will reflect on how the meaning of vernacular language and culture might change in the future under pressures of globalization. This lecture is designed particularly with an undergraduate audience in mind.

Seminar -- Seminar: Robert Grosseteste at Munich
PHILIPP ROSEMANN (Dallas)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning 126 (Polish Nationality Room)
European Studies Center
Department of Classics, Department of English, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean for..., Duquesne University’s Center for the Catholic Intellectual..., Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Medieval Latin Reading Group, National Institute for Newman Studies, The Humanities Center

Medieval Latin Reading Group seminar on the reception of mystical theology in fifteenth-century Munich and the significance of “minor” texts for the development of intellectual traditions.

We will discuss a short portion from Robert Grosseteste at Munich, Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations 14 (Louvain and Paris: Peeters, 2012). The reading, approximately two pages, will be circulated in advance in Latin and English translation. All are welcome, regardless of your prior involvement in the reading group. No Latin required.

Prof. Rosemann is chair of the department of philosophy at the University of Dallas. Trained in the history of medieval philosophy and modern continental philosophy, he has written several books at the intersection of these areas: Omne ens est aliquid. Introduction à la lecture du "système" philosophique de saint Thomas d'Aquin (Peeters, 1996); Omne agens agit sibi simile: A "Repetition" of Scholastic Metaphysics (Leuven University Press, 1996); Understanding Scholastic Thought with Foucault (The New Middle Ages series; St. Martin’s, 1999). In recent years, he has combined manuscript and book history with historical theology and institutional history in his studies of Lombard’s Sentences, the foundational text of the medieval university: Peter Lombard (Oxford University Press, 2004); The Story of a Great Medieval Book: Peter Lombard's "Sentences," (University of Toronto Press, 2007); and Mediaeval Commentaries on the "Sentences" of Peter Lombard, vol. 2. (ed.) (Brill, 2010). He edits the series Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations, and is currently working on tradition and transgression.

Information Session -- EuroChallenge Orientation
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

Lecture -- "The Political Ecology of the Early Spanish Caribbean"
Molly Warsh, Asst. Professor, Dept. of History
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3703 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center
Department of History European Colloquium
Free

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Symposium -- High School Model EU Simulation
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
WPU Lower Lounge
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium: Shakespeare and the Senses
Jennifer Waldron (English)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center

The book project, “Shakespeare and the Senses,” charts Shakespeare’s diverse experiments with cross-modal sensory and linguistic effects in relation to recent developments in historical phenomenology and current research in cognitive neuroscience.

*With responses by Bruce McConachie (Theater), Marianne Novy (English).

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Sculpting Matilda: The Sculptural Legacy of Bernini’s Monument of Countess Matilda in St. Peter’s in Rome
Amy Cymbala (HAA)
12:00 pm
Room 203, Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture

Matilda of Canossa - familiar to scholars of medieval papal history as a champion of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy - is best known to seventeenth-century scholars through the controversy which erupted from the “holy robbery” of her body in 1633. Under the cloak of night and the pope’s command, Matilda of Canossa’s body was taken from its tomb at the Lombard monastery of San Benedetto Polirone, much to the public outcry of the local religious community who venerated the eleventh-century noblewoman’s remains as “holy relics.” Her body was brought to Rome, and placed within an elaborate tomb in a strategic spot on the second right pier on the right aisle of St. Peter’s – a location that situated her directly on route to the Porta Sancta, through which Juibilee pilgrims would have to pass to receive an Indulgence of the Holy Year.

Through text, painting, and sculpture commissions, the celebratory “cult” of the Guelph noblewoman and papal supporter was invigorated on a grand scale under the cultural patronage of Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644). The tomb monument to Matilda of Canossa (1637) by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, remains one of the master sculptor’s least appreciated works; art historians quick to characterize the work as “expressionless,” “disappointing,” and “lifeless,” have dubbed the statue “Chilly Matilda.” However, such a critical reception belies the influential role that the monument played in seventeenth-century monument design. Seventeen years after the monument’s unveiling, Pope Alexander VII commissioned Bernini to complete an equestrian monument of Emperor Constantine, asking that the monument be made in the likeness of the monument to Matilda. Equally, when Pope Innocent XII commissioned the funerary monument for Queen Christine of Sweden he requested the work be similar to that of the Countess Matilda (“a somoglianza della quello Contessa Matilda”).

Using the lens of agency, Cymbala’s paper investigates why Matilda’s sculpted image became so central to papal commissions in the later half of the seventeenth century. Examining the sculptural interplay between the monuments to Matilda, Constantine, and Christine of Sweden, Cymbala will highlight the papal goals and political messages that such sculptural relationships espoused in the age of Catholic Reform in Rome.

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Conference -- VIDEOCONFERENCE: Europe in Crisis? The Prospects for a Renewed EU-US Partnership
Martin Schultz, European Parliament President
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for Transaltantic Relations, Johns Hopkins University
Free

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Media Practice and Protest Politics
Alice Mattoni (Sociology)
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
2431 WW Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Sociology

How do precarious workers employed in call-centres, universities, the fashion industry and many other labour markets organise, struggle and communicate to become recognised, influential political subjects? “Media Practices and Protest Politics; How Precarious Workers Mobilise” reveals the process by which individuals at the margins of the labour market and excluded from the welfare state communicate and struggle outside the realm of institutional politics to gain recognition in the political sphere.

In this important and thought provoking work Alice Mattoni suggests an all-encompassing approach to understanding grassroots political communication in contemporary societies. Using original examples from precarious workers mobilizations in Italy she explores a range of activist media practices and compares different categories of media technologies, organizations and outlets from the printed press to web application and from mainstream to alternative media.

Explaining how activists perceive and understand the media environment in which they are embedded the book discusses how they must interact with a diverse range of media professionals and technologies and considers how mainstream, radical left-wing and alternative media represent protests. Media Practices and Protest Politics offers important insights for understanding mechanisms and patterns of visibility in struggles for recognition and redistribution in post-democratic societies and provides a valuable contribution to the field of political communication and social movement studies.

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Cultural Event -- Stammtisch (German Conversation Table)
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Caribou Coffee
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week
pittgermanclub@gmail.com

Come to the German Conversation Table at Caribou Coffee from 8-10 pm. Practice conversing with other German speakers or just learn a little more about the language.

Cultural Event -- Tavola Italiana (Italian Conversation Table)
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Crazy Mocha
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week

Come to the Italian Conversation Table from 5-6 pm at Crazy Mocha to practice speaking in Italian or to learn more about the language. Listen and speak with other Italian speakers as a way to improve your knowledge of the language.

Lecture -- International Career Toolkit Series: Internships & Volunteering in Pittsburgh & Abroad
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, Study Abroad Office
Career Development and Placement Assistance Office
Vera Sebulsky
ved5@pitt.edu

All students with an interest in international studies are welcome to join us for a free workshop with the international studies certificate program advisors and Alyson Kavalukas, Pitt's Internship Coordinator, to learn about how to find international studies internships and volunteer opportunities both locally in Pittsburgh, in the United States, and overseas, through Pitt and on your own! We will discuss who can help find an internship that fits your goals, how to make use of your skills to build your resume or experiences, and you will meet with some current Pitt students who have had a variety of internship and volunteer experiences who will talk about what they did and answer your questions!

4:00-5:00 pm - Information session on internships, volunteering, networking, and where to start
5:00-6:00 pm - Student panel and open Q&A session

STUDENT PANELISTS:
Alexa Verink: Participant in the IIP in Madrid, Spain, majoring in Global Management and Marketing; certificate in Latin American Studies.

Laura Amster: Global Solutions Pittsburgh (GSP), majoring in Economics and minoring in French; certificate in Global Studies.

Cody Dickerson: Study abroad and volunteer experience in Beijing, China, majoring in Chinese; certificate in Asian Studies.

Jim Baraldi: Intern with Unite For Sight (Honduras), studied abroad in Istanbul, Turkey, and Wuhan, China, majoring in Chemistry and Neuroscience; certificate in Asian Studies.

Katarina Deshotel: Master's in International Development (Human Security), Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, interned at Amnesty International; graduate certificate in Asian Studies.

Hosted by the University Center for International Studies and the Office of Career Development & Placement Assistance

Panel Discussion -- Angela Merkel's Germany? Angela Merkel's Europe?
Professor Ronald Linden of The University of Pittsburgh, Moderator; Myra Marx Ferree of the University of Wisconsin; Alexander Privitera of the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies; Gregor Thum of the University of Pittsburgh; and Konrad Jarausch of the University of North Carolina
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
German Department and Think Transatlantic
Free.
Karen Lautanen
1 (412) 648-8517
kal70@pitt.edu

Experts on German politics and society will engage in an interactive multi-site discussion focusing on the German Chancellor, her politics and personality. How has she been represented in the press and popular culture throughout Europe? To what extent has Chancellor Merkel (her preferences, style, skills, background) shaped contemporary Europe? To what extent has she become a symbol of the current crises impacting Germany and other member states of the European Union?

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Cultural Event -- Pause Cafe (French Conversation Table)
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Crazy Mocha
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week

Come to Crazy Mocha on Oakland Ave. from 5:30-6:30 pm to participate in the French Conversation Table. Converse with other French speakers to improve your own language skills or simply to learn more about the language.

Teacher Training--Area Studies -- Global Issues Through Literature: Europe and Immigration
Bernard Hagerty (Dept. of History)
5:00 pm - 8:30 pm
4209 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Free
Veronica Dristas
dristas@pitt.edu

The first in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. The first workshop will focus on Europe and the topic of immigration. Dr. Bernard Hagerty will discuss the novel Bruno, Chief of Police, by the journalist Martin Walker. It is a remarkable portrayal of the new, multicultural French countryside. North African immigrants are central to the plot and are portrayed in an evenhanded and nuanced way, and rural people themselves appear as a pressured minority. History matters, and the EU is omnipresent.
Participants will receive a copy of the novel 2 weeks prior to the workshop. Act 48 credit will be given at the end of the series.

Cultural Event -- Bate Papo (Portuguese Conversation Table)
4:00 pm
527 William Pitt Union
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week

Come to the Portuguese Conversation Table in room 527 of the William Pitt Union at 4 pm to practice speaking Portuguese or to learn more about the language. Meet other Portuguese speakers and make some new friends too!

Seminar -- Carriers or barriers to human mobility? Shipping companies and the rise of modern border controls at a local, national and global scale (1882-1930)
Torsten Feys (Ghent University)
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
4130 Posvar
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
World History Center
Free
Seminar -- The Methodology of Things and Literary Study
Lynn Festa (Rutgers)
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of French and Italian, The Humanities Center
Chloe Hogg
hoggca@pitt.edu

Lynn Festa will be leading a workshop seminar on her paper, "Things in Kid Gloves." Please contact Chloe Hogg at hoggca@pitt.edu for a copy of the paper, to be circulated in advance to workshop participants. This workshop seminar is open to interested faculty and graduate students.

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Cultural Event -- French Club Meeting/Conversation
8:00 pm
232 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week
Free
pittfrenchclub@gmail.com

The French Club is a student run organization at the University of Pittsburgh dedicated to promoting the awareness and appreciation of French and francophone cultures around the world.

Lecture -- Tahiti and the Global Eighteenth Century
Lynn Festa (Rutgers)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of English, Department of French and Italian, Eighteenth-Century Studies at Pitt, The Humanities Center, World History Center

Lynn Festa is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers. Her publications include Sentimental Figures of Empire in Eighteenth-Century Britain and France (John Hopkins University Press, 2006) and, as co-editor, The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialisms and Postcolonial Theory (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Panel Discussion -- German Identity? European Identity?
Professor Patrick Altdorfer of The University of Pittsburgh, Moderator; Katrin Sieg of Georgetown University; Mr. Alexander Privitera, Ms. Kirsten Verclas, and Ms. Stephanie Bennett of the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
German Department and Think Transatlantic
Free.
Karen Lautanen
1 (412) 648-8517
kal70@pitt.edu

What is German Identity? What is European Identity? Where do these concepts overlap and where do they diverge? Join us for a discussion in German about the concepts of identity past and present, and how these concepts affect responses to immigration, integration, and the future of Europe.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Mock-Heroic before the Enlightenment
MICHAEL WEST (English)
12:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Presentation -- Framing Policy Debates in the European Union
Christine Mahoney
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4500 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Karen Lautanen
412-648-8517
kal70@pitt.edu

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Exhibit/Information Session -- “An Evening in Paris” Opening
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
McCarl Center Lounge
European Studies Center
College of General Studies, Study Abroad Office

*CGS Student Government/Alumni Society Networking Social*

Join the CGS Student Government and the CGS Alumni Society for the opening of the new McCarl Center
Photography Exhibit, “An Evening in Paris.” This exhibit features the photography of CGS Student Government
President Brian Coleman. Brian captured Paris’s joie de vivre while participating in Pitt’s Study Abroad Program
in France this past summer. Meet Brian and several other CGS students and alumni who have studied abroad, as
well as representatives from the Study Abroad Program and find out how you too might study in another country
as part of your Pitt experience.

*Refreshments will include French pastries.

Symposium -- Symposium- Crusade After The Crusades: Conquest, Colonialism, Contact Zones
Organizers: Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (French and Italian) & Bruce L. Venarde (History)
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, World History Center
Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski & Bruce L. Venarde
(412) 624-6224, (412) 624-8437
renate@pitt.edu, bvenarde@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

This small colloquium will explore late medieval projects of crusades that advocated an expansion of Europe and European values into the Near East. Utopian visions as well as hard-headed economic and military considerations are the hallmark of the treatises proposing these proto-colonial plans. Multiple topics and perspectives will allow us to place late medieval crusading ideologies into contexts that speak to modern critical approaches, such as colonial studies and post-colonial theory; critiques of Orientalism; and issues revolving around ideas of uses of the past in nationalist and imperialist projects.

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

Presentation -- Annual Commemoration of Kristallnacht
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Hillel-Jewish University Center, 4607 Forbes Avenue
European Studies Center
Department of German, Hillel-JUC, Jewish Studies Program

The “Night of Broken Glass” on November 9-10, 1938

Music by CMU Klezmer Band
Introductory Remarks by Alexander Orbach and Clark Muenzer
Readings by Pitt Students
Video Excerpts from Witnesses and Survivors

Lecture -- Colloquium: An Eighteenth Century Paradigm of Acculturation: Giuseppe Baretti’s Commonplace Book
Francesca Savoia (French and Italian)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of French and Italian, The Humanities Center

With responses by Stephen Carr (English), Louise Lippincott (Carnegie Art Museum), Adam Shear (Religious Studies).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Panel Discussion -- U.S. Elections: The View from Europe
Prof. Ronald Linden (Political Science), Dr. Alberta Sbragia (Vice Provost for Graduate Studies) and Prof. Michael Goodhart (Political Science)
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free.
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

What does Tuesday's outcome mean for Europe?
Three experts on European politics from the University of Pittsburgh discuss European reactions to the results of the U.S. presidential election. How do Europeans understand the electoral process? What effects will the presidential election have on U.S.-Europe relations? What are the implications of the U.S. election for the Euro Crisis? How do Europeans view the winner of the presidential election? Audience participation in the discussion is encouraged.
Lunch will be served.

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Film -- Movement Images: Masayo Kajimura, an Artist Talk
Masayo Kajimura
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of German, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Film Studies Program

A screening of works and a conversation with Masayo Kajimura, a Berlin-based video and installation artist. In her work Masayo creates a rich multi-layered flow of images that draw on settings and motifs from various global locations and cultural settings. Sharp insights and provocations underlie these evocative, lyrical, and associative projects.

Masayo Kajimura was born in Berlin in 1976, coming of acte before the fall of the Wall. In 2004 she received her MA in Cultural Studies and Art History from the premier programs at the Humbolt University. Already during her studies she began exhibiting video and installation work. She then studied advanced media arts in Gifu, Japan. In 2011 she had two solo exhibitions and more are in the planning stages. Although based in Berlin, she travels between Germany and Japan and has had artist in residence stays in multiple global locations including most recently in Estonia. In addition to her own artistic production, Kajimura works as a curator of the influential Made in Europe film series at the Werkstatt der Kulturen.

Conference -- Pitt Model United Nations Conference
(All day)
William Pitt Union
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
Global Solutions Pittsburgh, Pitt Model UN Club, United Nations Association of Pittsburgh
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

Teams of high school students from throughout the Pittsburgh region participated in the annual Pitt Model United Nations simulation.

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Conference -- Conference: Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy
(All day)
817 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
A.W. Mellon Foundation, Center for Philosophy of Science, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Department of History and Philosophy of Science-IU..., Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center, World History Center
Peter Distelzweig
pmd17@pitt.edu

The aim of the conference is to bring to the fore the medical context of the ‘Scientific Revolution’ and to explore the complex connections between medicine and natural philosophy in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe. Medicine and natural philosophy interacted on many levels, from the practical imperative to restore and maintain the health of human bodies to theoretical issues on the nature of living matter and the powers of the soul to methodological concerns about the appropriate way to gain knowledge of natural things. And issues of life, generation, aging, and vital activity were important topics of investigation for canonical actors of the Scientific Revolution, from Boyle, Hooke and Locke to Descartes and Leibniz. Recent efforts to recover the medical content and contexts of their projects have already begun to reshape our understanding of these key natural philosophers. Putting medical interests in the foreground also reveals connections with a wide variety of less canonical but historically important scientists, physicians, and philosophers, such as Petrus Severinus, Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Lodovico Settala, William Harvey, Richard Lower, Thomas Willis, Louis de la Forge, and Georg Ernst Stahl. This interdisciplinary conference will bring together scholars of Renaissance and Early Modern science, medicine and philosophy to examine the projects of more and less canonical figures and trace perhaps unexpected interactions between medicine and other approaches to studying and understanding the natural world.

Speakers:

Tawrin Baker (Indiana University)
Domenico Bertoloni Meli (Indiana University)
Antonio Clericuzio (University of Cassino)
Dennis Des Chene (Washington University)
Michelle DiMeo (College of Physicians of Philadelphia)
Peter Distelzweig (University of Pittsburgh)
Patricia Easton (Claremont Graduate University)
Benjamin Goldberg (East Tennessee State University)
Anita Guerrini (Oregon State University)
Hiro Hirai (Radboud University Nijmegen)
Dolores Iorizzo (University College London)
Cynthia Klestinec (Miami University, Ohio)
Gideon Manning (Caltech)
Craig Martin (Oakland University)
Evan Ragland (University of Alabama, Hunstville)
Alan Salter (University of Sydney)
Jole Shackelford (University of Minnesota)
Justin E. H. Smith (Concordia University, Montreal)
Charles Wolfe (Ghent University)

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

Lecture -- "Commercial visions: Building a global marketplace for scientific knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age"
Daniel Margócsy, Hunter College, City University of New York
4:00 pm
4130 WWPH
European Studies Center
World History Center of the University of Pittsburgh
Katie Jones
412-624-3073
joneskh@pitt.edu

Business does not only influence science in 21st-century America. This talk reveals how entrepreneurial science has been with us since the scientific revolution, and exposes how product marketing, patent litigation, and ghostwriting pervaded the practice of natural history and anatomy, the big sciences of the early modern era. It argues that the growth of global trade in the Dutch Golden Age gave rise to a transnational network of entrepreneurial science, connecting natural historians, physicians, and curiosi in Amsterdam, London, St Petersburg, or Danzig. These practitioners were out there to do business. They bought and sold exotica, preserved specimens, anatomical prints, and botanical atlases. This talk shows how, in their trade, Dutch naturalists relied on such mercantile innovations as postal networks and international banking, and also developed their own infrastructure for managing the long-distance, monetary exchange of scientific knowledge and curiosities. In the process, they contributed to the growth of modern science, and imbued its ethos and practices with financial undertones. Entrepreneurial rivalries, secrecy, and marketing strategies transformed the honorific, gift-based exchange system of the early modern Republic of Letters into a competitive marketplace. Emphatically, this talk also claims that trade brought about a culture of scientific debate in the Netherlands, thoroughly influencing the visual epistemology of early modern science. Market competition pitted naturalists against each other, and compelled them to develop philosophical arguments to promote the representational claims of their imaging techniques. This talk reconstructs how financial motives spurred a pamphlet war over the proper method to represent human anatomy, and also engendered the early eighteenth-century debate over Newtonian and Aristotelian color theory.

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Film -- German Film Festival: Identity
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center

MONDAY OCTOBER 29, 5-7PM
“THE LAST ILLUSION/DER RUF”
Director: Josef von Baky, b/w, 104 min., 1948/49
A German-Jewish university professor’s return to Germany at the end of the war brings
with it a difficult departure from his American émigré community, an unexpected
reunion with his ex-wife and a final battle against anti-Semitism. This film is based on
the displacement of actor and director Fritz Kortner and contains autobiographical elements.

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 5-7PM
“THE SONG IN ME/DAS LIED IN MIR”
Director: Florian Cossen, colour, 94min, 2010
During a stopover in Buenos Aires, Maria Falkenmayer hears a Spanish nursery song
and reacts in a troubled way. Where does she, a young German, remember this
melody and these lyrics from? In the search for an answer, she learns the truth about
her family, her origin, and her identity.

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 14, 5-7PM
“CLOUD NINE/WOLKE NEUN”
Director: Andreas Dresen, colour, 100 min., 20007/08
Inge meets Karl, impulsively falls passionately in love with him and leaves Werner,
her husband of 30 years, to go and live with Karl. Sounds like many other love stories,
apart from the fact that all parties involved are well into their sixties or even seventies.

Films will be shown from 5-7pm, 4217 WWPH. PIZZA WILL BE SERVED

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Science in the Mirror of Enlightenment Europe: Francesco Algarotti and the Remaking of a Cosmopolitan Book
Paula Findlen (Stanford)
5:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium (Reception to follow in the Cloisters)
European Studies Center
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, The World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

*Part of the The A. W. Mellon Distinguished Lectures in the History of Science

"Newton’s Shadow: Francesco Algarotti and the Passion for Science in the Eighteenth Century"

Paula Findlen is the Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History at Stanford University.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colloquium- A Discontinuous Voice
Amy Kaminsky (Minnesota)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center
humctr@pitt.edu

Visit of Short-Term Fellow Amy Kaminsky (Minnesota)

Dr. Kaminsky will be presenting her paper "A Discontinuous Voice" on English-Spanish bilingualism.

Responses by Daniel Balderston (Hispanic), Susan Andrade (English), Lina Insana (French and Italian), Piotr Gwiazda (Visiting Scholar, University of Maryland Baltimore County).

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access readings for colloquia by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf files. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Writing A Scientific Bestseller: The Making of Newtonianism for Ladies
Paula Findlen (Stanford)
5:00 pm
Center for Philosophy of Science, 817 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, The World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

*Part of the The A. W. Mellon Distinguished Lectures in the History of Science

"Newton’s Shadow: Francesco Algarotti and the Passion for Science in the Eighteenth Century"

Paula Findlen is the Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History at Stanford University.

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Seminar -- Medieval Translation in Theory
NICHOLAS WATSON (Harvard)
12:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Newton’s Prisms: Why Francesco Algarotti Became an Experimental Philosopher
Paula Findlen (Stanford)
5:00 pm
Center for Philosophy of Science, 817 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, The World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

*Part of the The A. W. Mellon Distinguished Lectures in the History of Science

"Newton’s Shadow: Francesco Algarotti and the Passion for Science in the Eighteenth Century"

Paula Findlen is the Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History at Stanford University.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Vernacular Theology Before the English Reformation
NICHOLAS WATSON (Harvard)
4:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Saturday, October 20th, 2012

Lecture -- Some Recent Research on Aptitude with Some Implications for Instructed SLA
Bill VanPatten (Michigan)
11:10 am - 12:20 pm
University Center, Carnegie Mellon University
European Studies Center
Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh

*Part of the 2012 Second Language Research Forum "Building Bridges Between Disciplines: SLA in Many Contexts"

Aptitude in adult SLA is claimed to correlate with learning, although the strength of correlation varies considerably (e.g., Skehan, 2012). One of the most studied and used components of aptitude is grammatical sensitivity (as measured by the MLAT). Grammatical sensitivity is assumed to measure an individual’s ability to see relationships among words, which in turn presumably underlies “grammar learning.” In a variety of empirical studies on classroom learners, grammatical sensitivity is indeed shown to correlate with rule learning (e.g., de Graff, 1998; Robinson, 1995; see also Sawyer & Ranta, 2001). But what if language learning is not characterized as rule learning? What if learning is characterized as the interaction of input with internal mechanisms (e.g., Universal Grammar), mediated by processing? In the present talk, I report the results of four studies in Spanish, Russian, French, and German in which we examined learners experiencing processing instruction with canonical and non-canonical word orders as these intersected with the First-noun Strategy. We used two measures (trials to criterion and posttest results). Unlike other research, we found no correlations between grammatical sensitivity and the two measures for any language for any structures. I will discuss these results in terms of how both language and language acquisition are conceptualized more generally in the literature on instructed SLA.

Bill VanPatten is Professor of Spanish and Second Language Studies as well as Director of Romance Language Instruction at Michigan State University. He has published extensively in the fields of second language acquisition and second language instruction. His research interests include second language input processing/sentence processing, the relationship between syntax and morphology, and instructed SLA.

Teacher Training--Language -- French Immersion
(All day)
European Studies Center

Femme morocaine

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Performance -- QUANTUM THEATER PRESENTS: Ainadamar
8:00 pm
East Liberty Presbyterian Church 116 S. Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206
European Studies Center
Pitt student tickets are $17, and Pitt faculty/staff tickets are $30.

Osvaldo Golijov’s unique, Grammy Award-winning chamber opera reunites the artists of Quantum’s acclaimed 2011 production Maria de Buenos Aires. To this point, it seems appropriate that we are in East Liberty again- this time, at the beautiful East Liberty Presbyterian Church. Ainadamar tells the story of Spanish poet and playwright Federico Garcia Lorca’s life as a young artist at the eve of the Spanish revolution and of his relationship with Margarita Xirgu, the great Catalan tragedian who was his muse. A flamenco-based score - Deep Song, as it’s called – articulates the pounding of horses’ hooves, the guns of the Falangists, and ultimately, the powerful, undeniable cry for freedom that could not be silenced. With a libretto by theatrical giant David Henry Hwang (M. Butterfly) and spectacular site-specific staging.

• POST-SHOW DISCUSSION: Sunday, October 21
Join Artistic Director, Karla Boos and Music Director, Andres Cladera, as well as members from the cast for a post-show Q&A session. Buy Tickets.
• LADIES NIGHT: Tuesday, October 23, 6:30pm
Join friends and meet new ones at this ladies-only reception and viewing of Ainadamar. Reception will be held at 6:30pm across the street at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater lobby. Buy Tickets.
• GRAPENUTS: Friday, October 26, 6:30pm
A special pre-show wine tasting and reception. In keeping with the play's theme, we will taste an assortment of Spanish and Latin American wines. Thanks to The Beauty Shoppe (6014 Penn Avenue) for hosting us! Buy Tickets.

Order online or Contact Quantum to book your tickets: 412-362-1713

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Theorizing the Vernacular
DERRICK PITARD (Slippery Rock)
12:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Lecture -- Translation Ambiguity in Language Learning, Processing, and Representation
Natasha Tokowicz (Psychology)
5:15 pm - 6:30 pm
University Center, Carnegie Mellon University
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh
Natasha Tokowicz
(412) 624-7026
tokowicz@pitt.edu

*Part of the 2012 Second Language Research Forum "Building Bridges Between Disciplines: SLA in Many Contexts"

This lecture describes a body of work exploring translation ambiguity, which occurs when a word in one language has more than one translation into another language. For example, the Spanish word "muñeca" translates to both "doll" and "wrist" in English. Our research demonstrates that such ambiguity leads to: (1) slower translation, (2) less accurate translation, and (3) less robust word learning. Furthermore, knowledge that a pair of words share a translation in a later-learned second language impacts the level of perceived relatedness between those words in a first language. For example, native English speakers who learn Spanish as a second language may consider the words "doll" and "wrist" to be more related than native English speakers who do not know Spanish. These findings will be discussed in terms of the ways that the relationship among word meanings across languages influences language learning, processing, and representation.

Natasha Tokowicz is currently Associate Professor of Psychology and Linguistics at the University of Pittsburgh. She received a B.A. in psychology with a minor in Spanish from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1995. She then earned Master's (1997) and Doctoral degrees (2000) in cognitive psychology at Penn State University. She was a post-doctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University and at the University of Pittsburgh prior to beginning her faculty position. Her research focuses on the cognitive processes related to adult second language learning and use. One line of this research focuses on translation ambiguity, which occurs when a word has multiple translations across languages. Another line of this research focuses on second language morpho-syntactic processing in relation to the similarities and differences between the native language and the second language. She uses event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in addition to behavioral measures, such as reaction time and accuracy, to examine these issues.

Lecture -- From Alchemist to Anatomist: Goethe’s Faust and Gabriel von Max’s Faust Illustrations
Jane Brown (Washington)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of German, The Eighteenth Century Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Lecture -- Heirs of a Dark Wood: The Principles and Poetics of Dante's Reception
JOE LUZZI (Bard College)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 332
European Studies Center
Department of French and Italian, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Barbara Stolarz
brs114@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

Joseph Luzzi is Associate Professor of Italian and Director of Italian Studies , and Co-Director of the first year seminar pro-gram at Bard College. . He received his Ph.D. in Italian Litera-ture from Yale university in 2000. Since then he has written a book, Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy, which has re-ceived the Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies from the Modern Language Association of America in 2009. He has also pub-lished reviews in the Los Angeles Times Book Review

Conference -- 2012 Second Language Research Forum
(All day)
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh

We are very proud to welcome the 2012 Second Language Research Forum to Pittsburgh, PA. Pittsburgh is known as the "City of Bridges", and we hope to use this idea to highlight the bridges that exist between the various disciplines involved in SLA research. SLRF 2012 will build on this theme with the aim of bridging gaps between individual disciplines that all share a common goal: to improve our understanding of second language learning, acquisition, instruction, and use. This conference will highlight the strengths of each discipline while providing a platform for an open dialogue between fields. To this end, we are inviting proposals for papers and colloquia from any field of study that addresses SLA.

Conference -- CONFERENCE: Exhibition Complex: Displaying People, Identity, and Culture
(All day)
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater (CMA)
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Cultural Studies Program, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Office of the Provost, The Humanities Center, Women's Studies Program
pittgradsymposium@gmail.com

The Department of History of Art & Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to announce its 2012 graduate student symposium titled “Exhibition Complex: Displaying People, Identity, and Culture.” Organized in collaboration with the Carnegie Museum of Art, our topic is inspired by the museum's fall 2012 exhibition Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World's Fairs, 1851-1939. This year's symposium sets out to analyze the many modes of display, types of artistic production, and built and existing structures that constitue ephemeral exhibition spaces. The keynote address will be delivered by Saloni Mathur, Associate Professor of Art History at UCLA and author of India by Design: Colonial History and Cultural Display (2007).

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Censorship and Cultural Change: Vernacular Theology, the Oxford Translation Debate, and Arundel's Constitutions of 1409
Jen Waldron (English) & Ryan McDermott (English)
12:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

Jen Waldron and Ryan McDermott will lead an informal seminar on Nicholas Watson’s "Censorship and Cultural Change: Vernacular Theology, the Oxford Translation Debate, and Arundel's Constitutions of 1409" (1995).

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Lecture -- PIZZA & POLITICS: “Inside the Brussels Complex”
Andrew Stark, MPIA ’13, GSPIA & Marina Duane, MID ’13, GSPIA
12:00 pm
3610 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Join GSPIA’s EU and the World Organization President Marina Duane and Vice-President Andrew Stark as they talk about their experience interviewing policy-makers, EU civil servants , and visiting major institutions in Brussels & Luxembourg as participants in the EU in Brussels Program, co-sponsored by Pitt’s EUCE/ESC & GSPIA. Marina and Andrew’s presentation will emphasize how the experience shaped their individual research projects and goals.
Pizza will be served.

Teacher Training--Area Studies -- Faculty Development Workshop for Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia
(All day)
4130 Posvar Hall and Southern Polytechnic University
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
Nine University and College International Studies...
Jennifer Murawski
412-383-3062
jennm@pitt.edu

UCIS affiliated faculty and staff presented a professional development workshop via videoconferencing for faculty from the Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia.

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Career Counselling/Information Session -- Europe Day
11:00 am - 7:30 pm
William Pitt Union, Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Stephen Lund
slund@pitt.edu

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11: EUROPE DAY!
Are you interested in studying and eventually working in Europe? Then join us for this series of events that will give you information and resources to successfully include Europe in your plans.

Europe Day Fair
11:00am – 2:00pm, Lower Lounge – William Pitt Union
The Europe Day Fair has been designed to promote Europe related programs and resources on campus, and help undergraduate students understand the ways they can Europeanize their studies and post graduate plans while at Pitt. Come meet with representatives from Europe related centers, academic programs, clubs and organizations on campus, and learn about Europe related resources at the office of Career Development & Placement Assistance. Also learn about European study abroad options and the many ways study abroad can be paid for with scholarships and financial aid.

Panel: “Your Interests in Europe and International Relations: Where Can They Lead?”
3:00 – 4:30, 4130 WWPH
Interested in learning how to match your interests in (Europe related) International Relations and Political Science with academic options and choices for graduate programs and professional fields? Join us for tips & suggestions and to brainstorm about your own interests and plans.
Panelists include: Ron Linden, Director, EUCE/ESC; Bob Hayden, Director, REES; Gemma Marolda, Faculty, EUCE and Political Science Dept; Kristian McCloud – Career Development and Placement Assistance Office

“Passport Career” Orientation
6:00 – 8:30, Lower Lounge – WPU
Passport Career is a useful tool for Pitt students and alumni who may be considering a job or internship search abroad and allows users to search for information by city and country of interest. Susan Musich, the founder Executive Director of Passport Career, will introduce this new resource to students interested in exploring possibilities of working abroad.

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

Panel Discussion -- Video Conference: Conversations on Europe: "The End of Soft Power? The EU and the Middle East."
Various
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

As this second installment in our series of interactive videoconferences this year, Conversations in Europe, the EUCE/ESC will bring experts together via remote connection to discuss the range and level of European influence in the Middle East. Europe has, until recently, been an attractive model for countries in democratization, because of the non-threatening, non-military way Europe—and the EU in particular—attracted adherents. Almost two years after the Arab Spring, does Europe retain any influence, any ability to influence events? Panelists will include: Mohammed Bamyeh (University of Pittsburgh); Tal Sadeh (Tel Aviv University); Urfan Khaliq (Cardiff University); Beverly Crawford (University of California, Berkeley); and Eva-Maria Maggi (Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of Washington). Ronald Linden, Professor of Political Science, will moderate. Audience participation is invited.

Conference -- 2012 International Workshop on Higher Education Reform
various
(All day)
University of Pittsburgh Campus
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Institute for International Studies in Education
Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education, Centre for Policy Studies in Higher Education and Training, Comparative & International Education Society Higher..., Honk Kon Institute of Education, PASCAL International Observatory, Research Consortium of Asian Education and Development..., University of British Columbia

Reforming the Policy and Practice of Community Engagement of Higher Education featuring keynote addresses by:
Mark A. Nordenberg, Chancellor, University of Pittsburgh
David P. Baker, Penn State
Kassie Freeman, President, Southern University System
Alex Johnson, President, CCAC
Anne Kaplan, Vice President, Northern Illinois University
Josef W. Konvitz, Chair, PASCAL International Observatory

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

Lecture -- Brazil and Turkey: Emerging Nations in the New Global Order
Lílian Duarte (Cultural Attaché, Brazilian Embassy in Turkey)
12:00 pm
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Luz Amanda Hank
lavst12@pitt.edu
Lecture -- Did European Monetary Union (EMU) Promote a European Identity?
Tal Sadeh, Tel Aviv University
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
free
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

Professor Tal Sadeh, Head of the Hartog School of Government and Policy at Tel Aviv University, will discuss the effects of monetary union on supranational identity in Europe.

Friday, October 5th, 2012

Lecture -- The Influence of English Phonetics and Phonology on L2 Spanish Rhotics and Pedagogy
Michael Olsen (Linguistics)
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning - Room G8
Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center
Department of Linguistics

*A practice conference talk

Abstract
This study investigates L2 Spanish rhotic production in learners enrolled in first-semester and fourth-semester courses, specifically addressing the effects that the different ways to produce American English rhotics (retroflex and bunched) have on the production of Spanish taps and trills. It also addresses the influence that the phonological environment producing taps in English has on the acquisition of Spanish taps. The research questions that drove this study are the following:

1. Does Manner of American English rhotic articulation (i.e., retroflex or bunched) affect the facilitation of Spanish rhotic production?

2. Does the phonological environment that governs taps in English affect the accuracy in Spanish rhotic production?

3. Are these hypothesized effects evident in more advanced learners as well as beginners?

Forty-eight students enrolled in first-semester Spanish foreign language classes and thirty-five students enrolled in fourth-semester Spanish foreign language classes were recorded while reading a Spanish text (five short paragraphs) aloud containing thirty-two intervocalic taps and four intervocalic trills. Of the taps, nineteen occurred in environments that would produce taps in English and thirteen taps occurred in other environments. The higher proficiency group also read a second text that contained forty-two intervocalic trills.

Results from multiple linear regressions show that English rhotic articulation alone is a significant predictor of trill accuracy. English rhotic articulation is also a predictor of tap accuracy when controlling for amount of Spanish exposure for beginning learners. These effects, however, disappear altogether in the more advanced learners. Concerning
the effect of the phonological environment producing taps in English on the production of Spanish rhotics, results from paired samples t-tests show that both the first-semester and the fourth-semester groups produced accurate taps significantly more in Spanish words that have the same phonological environment that produces taps in English.

These results suggest that learners who employ bunched-like articulations are at a slight disadvantage to their retroflex-like producing counterparts at the point when they notice a contrast between English and Spanish rhotics. This disadvantage subsequently disappears as exposure to Spanish increases and is non-existent in the more advanced learners. The phonological environment that produces taps in English influences the accuracy of Spanish taps for both proficiency levels and is therefore a stronger influence on Spanish rhotic accuracy. This implies that less conscious and more abstract phonological phenomena have a stronger and longer lasting impact on Spanish rhotic production than phonetic factors.

Seminar -- Poor People, Poor Places, and Poor Health: the Mediating Role of Social Networks and Social Capital
Center for Health Equity Journal Club
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
A215 Crabtree
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for Health Equity Journal Club

CHE hosts this monthly meeting to facilitate dialogue about health equity among faculty, students, and staff. We hope to spark an intellectually enriching discussion regarding ways to research a problem or intervene to contribute to the solution.

This month’s meeting is facilitated by Jason Flatt, PhD candidate, and Laura Macia, PhD and features the article Poor People, Poor Places, and Poor Health: the Mediating Role of Social Networks and Social Capital. The "[p]aper is based on qualitative research undertaken in 1996 on two housing estates in East London,UK."

Feel free to bring your lunch.

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Lecture -- Sustainable Energy Innovators: Moving Toward a Low-Carbon Future
Dr. Miranda Schreurs of the Free University of Berlin
4:00 pm
7th floor Alumni Hall Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Provost Office

Provost Lecture at Science 2012
Miranda A. Schreurs, PhD, is a recognized leader in the field of comparative environmental politics and policy in Europe, the United States, and East Asia.

Schreurs grew up in the United States and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Washington and her doctorate in comparative politics from the University of Michigan. She joined the University of Maryland in 1994 and has worked as a guest professor at universities in Japan and Germany. In 2007, she was recruited to the Freie Universität Berlin as professor of comparative politics and director of the university’s Environmental Policy Research Centre, an international team of social science researchers and students who study, evaluate, and provide policy advice related to environmental and sustainable energy politics and policies.

In 2008, Schreurs became a member of the German Advisory Council on the Environment. She is chair of the European Environment and Sustainable Development Advisory Councils, a network of advisory councils across Europe. In 2012, German Chancellor Angela Merkel appointed her to the Ethics Commission on a Safe Energy Supply, which was charged with advising the German government on energy questions after the Fukushima nuclear explosion.

Author of several books and many journal articles on energy and environmental policy, Schreurs has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council–MacArthur Foundation Program on International Peace and Security Affairs, the Fulbright Foundation, and the National Science Foundation/Science and Technology Agency of Japan.

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Lecture -- Political Translators: How Heterogeneous Movement Groups Can Democratize Communication
Dr. Nicole Doerr, postdoctoral fellow at the Free University of Berlin and the University of California Irvine
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
2432 WW Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
The Pittsburgh Social Movements Forum and the Kenneth P....

Lunch will be provided

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Lecture -- "Woes, woes, and euros: Origins and likely outcomes of the European debt crisis."
Dave Andrews, Director of the European Union Center of California at Scripps College in Claremont, California
12:00 pm
4217 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

David M. Andrews is the Jean Monnet Chair of EU Interdisciplinary Studies, Gabrielle Marie-Louise Jungels-Winkler Chair in Contemporary European Studies, Professor of International Relations, and Director of the European Union Center of California at Scripps College in Claremont, California. His talk will be about the European Debt Crisis, as he is an expert on monetary union and Germany’s place in the EU. While on campus, he will also be visiting the Delegation Collection at the Hillman library to finish up the research for his book on the foundations of the European Union and how efforts to resolve “the German problem” led to monetary union.

Seminar -- Collaborative Working Methods Among Early Modern Humanists
Ann Blair (Harvard)
12:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Monday, October 1st, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Latin Authorship During the Rise of the Vernaculars
Ann Blair (Harvard)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Lecture -- International Career Toolkit Series: So You Want to Work Abroad?
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
4400 Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, Study Abroad Office
Career Development and Placement Assistance Office
Vera Sebulsky
ved5@pitt.edu

A great way for students to learn about the opportunities awaiting them on campus, in the city, and even abroad!

Lecture -- Roses in Winter: How One Recipe Collection May Coax Us Beyond Shakespeare's Procreation Sonnets
REBECCA LAROCHE (Uni of Colorado-Colorado Springs)
3:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Pittsburgh Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, The English and Women's Studies Departments at Chatham..., the English Department Literature Program, Women's Studies Program
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

In Roses in Winter Rebecca Laroche moves beyond recent readings of recipes, distillation and the procreation sonnets. Focusing closely on how one recipe book treats roses and various rose products, Laroche returns to the sonnets with a new appreciation of how roses in these poems are not merely distilled, but rather they grow. What is more, rose water and oil are not everlasting; they, too, fade, and, in their use, they must be replenished. This close, archivally-driven reading recognizes that the different moments of distillation function variously in the sonnets, as a recipe on distilling rose oil differs from a recipe for damask water and both differ from a recipe that has a water or an oil as an ingredient. The lecture as a whole makes a strong argument for more archival work with manuscripts from the early modern era.

REBECCA LAROCHE is Professor of English at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Her publications include Medical Authority and and Englishwomen’s Herbal Texts, 1550-1650 (Ashgate, 2010) and Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity (Palgrave, 2011), co-edited with Jennifer Munroe.

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Lecture -- The Impact of Scientific Discoveries
Adam Davis (Duquesne)
6:00 pm
Scaife Hall, Lecture Room 5
European Studies Center
Health Sciences Library System

A corollary to the traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine: "Rewriting the Book of Nature: Charles Darwin and the Rise of Evolutionary Theory."

Seminar -- Too Much to Know: Information Management in Comparative Perspective & Tommaso Porcacchi
Dennis Looney (French & Italian)
12:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501G
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center

Dennis Looney will lead an informal seminar on links between Ann Blair’s work (Too Much to Know:
“Information Management in Comparative Perspective") and his research on the systematization of history by Tommaso Porcacchi of the Giolito Press, in the 1560s and 1570s.

*Part of the yearlong series, “Speaking in Tongues”

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

Lecture -- A Fallen Hindu Idol in Antwerp: Rubens’s Miracles of St. Francis Xavier and the Theme of Idol Smashing
Rachel Miller (HAA)
12:00 pm
Room 203 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture

The background of Peter Paul Rubens’s Miracles of St. Francis Xavier, painted in 1617 for the Jesuit church in Antwerp, contains a surprising detail - a horned Hindu idol that is being destroyed by rays of light emanating from an allegory of the Catholic Faith. Far from being meaningless exotica, the Hindu idol plays an important iconographic role in the larger decorative scheme of the Antwerp Jesuit church. Designed by Rubens in 1620 and executed by his assistants, the ceiling decoration of the side aisles and galleries contains several other images of the destruction of idols by early Christian saints such as St. Eugenia and St. John Chrysostom. There is no other Jesuit church in the world where the themes of iconoclasm and idol smashing are so prominent. This iconography must have had special significance for audiences in Antwerp. In the course of this presentation, I will demonstrate that the events of the late sixteenth century, including the iconoclasm of 1566 and the tyrannical governorship of the Duke of Alba, still resonated in Antwerp and led Rubens to make certain iconographic choices when confronted with the problem of how to depict the destruction of religious images in a city that was still recovering from wounds inflicted by revolt, oppression, mutiny, and war.

Saturday, September 22nd, 2012

Teacher Training--Language/Workshop -- Linking Language and Literary-Cultural Content: A Multiliteracies Approach to Advanced Collegiate FL Teaching
Heather Allen (Wisconsin)
10:00 am - 3:00 pm
Martin Room, 4127 Sennott Square
European Studies Center, Global Studies Center
Department of French and Italian, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Office of Graduate...
losagio@pitt.edu

*Lunch provided*
RSVP to losagio@pitt.edu by Monday, September 17, 2012

Graduate students and faculty are invited to participate in this workshop, which will provide training in the theory and application of the multiliteracies approach to teaching advanced-level foreign language courses. Participants will have the chance to develop their own teaching materials.

Heather Willis Allen is an Assistant Professor of French and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she also serves as Course Chair for the Elementary French program. Allen’s research interests include language-learning motivation, teacher development, and literacy-based approaches to teaching and learning. Her book-length publications include Educating the Future Foreign Language Professoriate for the 21st Century (Heinle Cengage, 2011), co-edited with Hiram H. Maxim, and Alliages culturels: La société française en transformation (in press, Heinle Cengage), a literacy-based introduction to French culture today textbook co-authored with Sebastien Dubreil. Allen’s research has also appeared in the ADFL Bulletin, Foreign Language Annals, the French Review, Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, the Journal of Studies in International Education, the L2 Journal and the Modern Language Journal. Her next project, contracted with Pearson, is a co-authored introduction to foreign language teaching manual entitled A Multiliteracies Framework for Collegiate Foreign Language Teaching.

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Seminar -- Too Much to Know: Information Management in Comparative Perspective- Ch.2 & 3 Seminar
Dan Selcer (Duquesne)
7:30 pm
Jen Waldron's house
European Studies Center
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

Dan Selcer will lead an informal seminar on chapters two & three of Ann Blair's Too Much to Know: "Information Management in Comparative Perspective," as a lead-up to the author's visit in October.

Email Jennifer Waldron for directions.

Panel Discussion -- Colloquium- Evidence of Things Not Seen: History, Subjectivities, Music- Critical Musicological Reflections
Susan McClary (Case Western)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
humctr@pitt.edu

With responses by Nancy Condee (Global Studies), Kathryn Flannery (English), Andrew Weintraub (Music)

Susan McClary is Professor of Music at Case Western University. Her research focuses on the cultural criticism of music, both the European canon and contemporary popular genres. She is best known for her book Feminine Endings: Music, Gender, and Sexuality (1991), which examines cultural constructions of gender, sexuality, and the body in various musical repertories, ranging from early seventeenth-century opera to the songs of the pop queen Madonna. In her more recent publications, she explores the many ways in which subjectivities have been construed in music from the sixteenth-century onward. Modal Subjectivities: Renaissance Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal (2004) won the Otto Kinkeldey Prize from the American Musicological Society in 2005, and its sequel — Desire and Pleasure in Seventeenth-Century Music — appeared in 2012.

Faculty and graduate students in Pitt Humanities departments can access colloquium papers two weeks before the event by logging in to , clicking on the tab “My Resources,” clicking on “Humanities Center,” and then clicking on “Colloquium Series” where there is a link to the pdf file. Anyone else wishing to access the readings may request the reading at humctr@pitt.edu.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza and Politics: Paradigm Change in EU Migration-Foreign Policy Nexus
Fatma Yilmaz
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
WWPH 4217
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

The first in our Pizza and Politics Graduate Lecture Series for 2012-2013, EUCE/ESC Visiting Scholar Fatma Yilmaz (Turkey) will be lead a round table discussion about the logic behind EU migration policies toward third countries. Has there been any real change in traditional control-oriented migration policies in terms of foreign policy? Pizza will be served.

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

Lecture -- Csárdás in ¾ Time: The Post-Imperial Cinema World in Interwar Austria and Hungary
Andrew Behrendt, Ph.D. Student, Department of History
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Department of History
Free
Anna Talone
87407
crees@pitt.edu

The Habsburg Monarchy disappeared in 1918, but many elements of its urban culture survived and even continued to evolve in the years to follow. In popular cinema of the interwar period, we can pick up what Nancy Condee has called, in other contexts, an "imperial trace" and begin to map out a common cultural space that continued to bridge the former twin seats of empire, Vienna and Budapest. For this talk, I will focus on three titles -- Frühjahrsparade (1934), Ernte/Die Julika (1936), and Maria Ilona (1939) -- helmed by Géza von Bolváry, one of the most prolific directors of the period. These films point the way toward a "post-imperial" cinema that both re-enacted and re-imagined the relationship between the Austrian and Hungarian halves of the vanished Dual Monarchy.

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

Lecture -- Salome in the Court of Queen Christina
Susan McClary (Case Western)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
The Humanities Center
humctr@pitt.edu

The lurid biblical story of John the Baptist, King Herod, and Herod’s precocious stepdaughter became an operatic hit in 1905 with Richard Strauss’ Salome. The lecture presents an earlier musical version of this character, la Figlia in Alessandro Stradella’s oratorio San Giovanni Battista (1675), and considers the reasons why femmes fatales ruled the operatic stage in the seventeenth no less than in the late nineteenth century.

Susan McClary is Professor of Music at Case Western University. Her research focuses on the cultural criticism of music, both the European canon and contemporary popular genres. She is best known for her book Feminine Endings: Music, Gender, and Sexuality (1991), which examines cultural constructions of gender, sexuality, and the body in various musical repertories, ranging from early seventeenth-century opera to the songs of the pop queen Madonna. In her more recent publications, she explores the many ways in which subjectivities have been construed in music from the sixteenth-century onward. Modal Subjectivities: Renaissance Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal (2004) won the Otto Kinkeldey Prize from the American Musicological Society in 2005, and its sequel — Desire and Pleasure in Seventeenth-Century Music — appeared in 2012.

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Cultural Event/Reception -- Irish Studies End-of-Week Reception
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Lower lounge, Wm Pitt Union
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free

To cap off the events of Irish Studies Week 2012, the EUCE/ESC will host a reception with live Irish music and information on the multiple opportunities to explore contemporary and historical Ireland while at the University of Pittsburgh. Refreshments provided. Open to the community.

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Information Session/Lecture -- Multi-disciplinary Study Abroad in Ireland
Dr. Janice Vance
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4014 Forbes Tower
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Dr. Janice Vance of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences will discuss opportunities for and lessons learned from a unique study abroad program in Ireland. She directs a multi-disciplinary program which provides students with the opportunity to explore research, professional practice, and service provision models in Belfast (UK) and Dublin (Ireland) in a range of professions.

Film/Lecture -- Film Screening: “We Carried Your Secrets”
Tony Novosel, Department of History
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

“We Carried Your Secrets” is a film that chronicles the story of a unique and ground breaking form of theatrical performance called “Theatre of Witness.” It reflects on the very personal and inspirational stories of 7 people as they come to terms with their own legacy and that of their fathers, men who were all badly affected by over thirty years of conflict in Northern Ireland. A viewing of the film will be followed by a Skype discussion with one of the participants in the Theatre of Witness project.
Discussion led by Dr. Anthony Novosel, Dept of History

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

Lecture -- The Bloody Poor Irish: Poverty and Identity in Ireland
Bernard Hagerty, Department of History
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Dr. Bernard Haggerty (Department of History) will present a lecture on cultural constructions of poverty in Irish history.

Lecture -- "Charles Darwin's Challenge to the Skeptics"
Robert Olby (History & Philosophy of Science)
12:00 pm
Scaife Hall, Lecture Room 5
European Studies Center
Health Sciences Library System

This lecture will explore the manner in which Darwin prepared his case and crafted his text to meet the skeptics. This analysis will raise questions about the criteria demanded for the acceptance of evidence and prompt reflection on the present state of the subject.

In conjunction with the traveling exhibit "Rewriting the Book of Nature: Charles Darwin and the Rise of Evolutionary Theory" from the National Library of Medicine.

Lecture -- The Prehistoriography of Mesopotamian Art
Melissa Eppihimer (History of Art and Architecture)
12:00 pm
Room 203, Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of History of Art and Architecture

The study of Mesopotamian art is often said to have begun in the 19th century, when spectacular sculptures were uncovered in the Assyrian capital cities of Nineveh, Nimrud and Khorsabad. However, examples of Mesopotamian art had been in European collections of art and antiquities since the Renaissance. During the 17th and 18th centuries, these artifacts, mostly cylinder and stamp seals, were not recognized as Mesopotamian. Instead, they were collected alongside the gems of Greece and Rome, among which they were thought to belong, or classified as Egyptian amulets. This talk examines the ideas, methods, and publications of the collectors and scholars who engaged with Mesopotamian art in the early modern period in order to explain their erroneous conclusions. The analysis of the history of the collections and the historiography of ancient art illuminates the prehistoriography of Mesopotamian art and demonstrates how this period of scholarship set the stage for later, better-known developments in the field.

Repeats every week until Tue Dec 11 2012 .
Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Film -- Weimar Cinema Screenings (German Cinema 1919-1933)
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Lawrence Hall, Room 209
European Studies Center
Department of German
Free
Randall Halle
412.648.2614
randall.halle@gmail.com

All films will have subtitles accessible to non-German speaking audiences. All film screenings are open to the public. All films will be DVD projection. Many of these films are rare and hard to find. I would encourage you to bring friends so they can take advantage of the experience.

Tuesday September 11
Nerven [Nerves] (Robert Reiner 1919)
Die Austernprinzessin [The Oyster Princess] (Ernst Lubitsch 1919)

Tuesday September 18
Schloß Vogeloed [Castle Vogeloed] (F.W. Murnau 1921)
Nosferatu (F,W. Murnau 1922)

Tuesday September 25
Die freudlose Gasse [Joyless Streets] (Georg Wilhelm Pabst 1925)
Asphalt (Joe May 1929)

Tuesday October 2
Die Elf Teufel [The Eleven Devils] (Zoltan Korda 1927)
König der Mittelstürmer [The Champion of the Stadium] (Fritz Freisler 1927)

Tuesday October 9
Metropolis (Fritz Lang 1927)
Algol (Hans Werckmeister 1920)
Wunder der Schöpfung [Our Heavenly Bodies] (Hanns Walter Kornblum 1925)

Tuesday October 16
Berlin, die Sinfonie der Großstadt [Berlin the Symphony of the Great City] (Walter Ruttmann 1927)
Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed [The Adventures of Prince Achmed] (Lotte Reiniger, 1923-26)

Tuesday October 23
Büchse der Pandora [Pandora’s Box] (Georg Wilhelm Pabst 1929)
Der Letzte Mann [Last Laugh] (F. W. Murnau 1924)

Tuesday October 30
Der Blaue Engel [The Blue Angel] (Josef Von Sternberg 1930)

Tuesday November 6
Anders als die Andern [Different from the Others] (Richard Oswald 1919)
Mädchen in Uniform [Girls in Uniform] (Leontine Sagan 1931)

Tuesday November 13
Menschen am Sonntag [People on Sunday] (Robert Siodmak 1930)

Tuesday November 20
Die Dreigroschenoper [Three Penny Opera] (Georg Wlhelm Pabst 1931)

Tuesday November 27
Kuhle Wampe [To Whom Does the World Belong?] (Slatan Dudow 1932)

Tuesday December 4
Die Drei von der Tankstelle [Three Men and Lilian] (Wilhelm Thiele 1930)
Der Kongress Tanzt [The Congress Dances] (Erik Charell 1931)

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Lecture -- Grand Legacy? Ireland's Gaelic Revivals, Past and Present
Professor Timothy McMahon, Marquette University
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Professor of History at Marquette University, Timothy McMahon will use this lecture to build upon a question that framed his book, Grand Opportunity: The Gaelic Revival and Irish Society. Inspired by a from a quotation from a revivalist who wondered whether his fellow revivalists recognized the grand opportunity that their work presented to them, Dr. McMahon uses this as a starting point for a reflection on the legacies of that earlier revival the state of the language today, particularly in the light of Ireland's relationship to Europe. Marie Young, Department of Linguistics, will serve as respondent.

Seminar -- Too Much to Know: Information Management in Comparative Perspective- Ch.1 Seminar
Adam Shear (Humanities Center)
12:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Humanities Center
Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

Adam Shear will lead an informal seminar on chapter one of Ann Blair's Too Much to Know: "Information Management in Comparative Perspective," as a lead-up to the author's visit in October.

Panel Discussion -- Video Conference: Conversations on Europe: "Tiger in a Cage: Ireland and the New European Economy"
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The EUCE at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

In January 2012, the EUCE/ESC launched the new speaker series, Conversations On Europe. Featuring some of the country's top experts on the European Union, this series will link participants and presenters via videoconferencing across several sites. Audiences at all sites will be able to ask questions of the experts. This event is open to the public.
The Conversations Continue Fall 2012 with "Tiger in a Cage: Ireland and the New European Economy" on Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 12 Noon in 4217 Posvar Hall. Panelists will include:
Prof. Stephen Kinsella (Economics, University of Limerick)
Prof. James S. Donnelly (Emeritus, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Prof. Klaus Larres (Political Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Mr. Vincent Browne, print and broadcast journalist for the Irish Times and TV3 Ireland.
Moderated by Ronald Linden, Director, EUCE/ESC

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Lecture -- From Royal Retainers to Public Servants, or how an Old Regime Family succeeded in Post-Revolutionary France
Dena Goodman (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)
5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center
Department of French and Italian, Department of History, Eighteenth-Century Studies at Pitt, The Humanities Center

Dena Goodman is the Lila Miller Collegiate Professor, History and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan. A leading specialist in the cultural and intellectual history of early modern France, her monographs include Becoming a Woman in the Age of Letters (2009) and The Republic of Letters: A Cultural History of the French Enlightenment (1994), both with Cornell University Press.

Panel Discussion -- The Irish Diaspora: From the Emerald Isle to the Steel City
David W. Miller, Carnegie Mellon University; Matt O'Brien, Franciscan University; Peter Gilmore, Carlow University
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

A panel discussion of Irish migration since the 18th century with specific focus on the Irish experience in Pittsburgh. Featured panelists are Irish historians at Universities in the Pittsburgh region. James Lamb, Honorary Consul of Ireland will chair the discussion.

Lecture -- Lecture: University-Community Partnerships for Community and Economic Regeneration in Irish Cities
Prof. Tracy Soska, School of Social Work; Prof. Sabina Deitrick, GSPIA
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning, 20th Floor Conference Room
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
School of Social Work
Free
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

As part of the EUCE/ESC's Irish Studies Week, Profesors Sabina Deitrick (Associate Professor in GSPIA and Co-Director of UCSUR's Urban and Regional Planning Program) and Tracy Soska (Professor in the School of Social Work, COSA Chair, and Director of Continuing Education) will share their experiences visiting Ireland and Northern Ireland as co-Directors of Pitt's Community Outreach Partnership Center. They went to the island to meet, present to, consult with, and learn from university and community colleagues. During this session, they will share lessons learned and progress made in such sites as Dublin, Limerick, Cork, Derry and Belfast. Lunch will be provided.

Cultural Event -- Irish Studies Week
(All day)
Various Locations
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Allyson Delnore
adelnore@pitt.edu

From September 10-14, 2012 the EUCE/ESC will host Irish Studies Week. The activities will include a video conference, center lectures on Gaelic Revivals, The Irish in Pittsburgh, the Idea of Poverty in Ireland, and Irish Culture. Please check back for a full list of programs.

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Reception -- Welcome Back Reception - EUCE/ESC
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
Karen Lautanen
kal70@pitt.edu

The European Union Center of Excellence and European Studies Center welcome back students and faculty and usher in the new academic year with refreshments and conversation. Wilkommen, bienvenue, welcome - we hope to see you there.

Lecture -- Transmitting EU Environmentalism to Latin America: What happens when European companies invest overseas?
Carolyn M. Dudek, Hofstra University
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Free
adelnore@pitt.edu

Author of the first Pittsburgh Papers publication will give a lecture based on her research on the role of private companies in spreading EU based environmental norms.

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Conference -- Joint Graduate Student Conference of the Universities of Pittsburgh and Augsburg
various
(All day)
University of Augsburg, Germany
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of German, Universität Augsburg

This three-day symposium "Crossing Borders: Ways of Constructing Identities" will take place at the University of Augsburg as a joint graduate student conference between the University of Augsburg and the University of Pittsburgh. Fifteen total graduate students will present: five graduate students from the University of Pittsburgh and ten from the University of Augsburg will be giving individual presentations on topics related to their dissertation research. The Faculty of Philology and History at the University of Augsburg will provide conference rooms.

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Media Briefing -- Dr. Sbragia on "Essential Pittsburgh" (90.5 Essential Radio)
Alberta Sbragia (Vice-Provost, Political Science)
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
90.5 FM
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
90.5 Essential Public Radio
Free

On Monday, François Hollande became the first French Socialist candidate elected president since 1981. He campaigned for higher government spending and taxation. Does this signal a new economic approach to Europe’s financial problems? What might happen to austerity? And what is the Socialist economic approach? Dr. Alberta Sbragia, University of Pittsburgh Vice Provost and former Director of the European Studies Center and the European Union Center of Excellence addresses these questions, and talks about the future of the EU.

Friday, May 4th, 2012

Conference -- Regulating Unregulated Migration: European and U.S. Reactions to Immigration
Mulitple
(All day)
Pittsburgh Athletic Association, 4215 5th Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15213
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Sociology
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

Regulating Unregulated Migration:
European and U.S. Reactions to Immigration

Friday, May 4th
9:00-9:30 Continental Breakfast
9:30-10:00 Welcome and Introductions
Suzanna Crage, Department of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh
Ronald Linden, Director, European Union Center of Excellence/European Studies Center

10-11:30 The EU & U.S.: Demographic trends
Martin Schain, Department of Politics, New York University

11:30-1:30 Lunch (for registered participants)
Presentation: Public opinion about migration in the US and selected European countries
Hamutal Bernstein, German Marshall Fund

1:45-3:15 US migration politics, Arizona immigration laws, US Courts
Marc Rosenblum, Congressional Research Service, U.S. Library of Congress
Luis F.B. Plascencia, Dept. of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Arizona State University

3:30-5:00 Approaches to controlling migration in Pennsylvania, Alabama, and Texas
Jan Ting, Beasley School of Law, Temple University
Shay Farlay, Alabama Appleseed Center for Law & Justice Inc., Montgomery, AL
Faye Kolly, De Mott, McChesney, Curtright & Armendáriz, LLP, Immigration and Criminal Defense Attorneys, Austin, Texas

Saturday, May 5th

8:30-9:00 Continental breakfast

9:00-10:30 EU politics, policies, and practices
Kris Pollet, European Council on Refugees and Exiles, Brussels, Belgium
Adam Luedtke, Political Science Dept., Stockton College

10:45-12:15 Migration control in the Mediterranean
Nick Vaughan-Williams, Dept. of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick
Cetta Mainwaring, International Relations, Wadham College, Oxford University

All panels are free and open to the public.
Organized by Suzanna Crage, Dept of Sociology

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Medieval Vernacular Literary Theory: the Ethics of Form
Eleanor Johnson (Columbia)
3:00 pm
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Professor Jennifer Waldron
(412) 624-3246
jwaldron@pitt.edu

"Speaking in Tongues" Lecture Series

More details about the lecture will follow.

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

Conference -- One-day conference - The Middle Ages and The Holocaust: Medieval Anti-Judaism in the Crucible Of Modern Thought
Organized by Professor Hannah Johnson (English) and Nina Caputo (University of Florida)
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Professor Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu
http://www.medren.pitt.edu/

From medieval pogroms to modern racial science, Jewish history in Europe has come to stand as a test case for thinking about problems of historical continuity and change, embodied most clearly in the tension between narratives emphasizing a timeless antisemitism and arguments for the distinctive mentalities associated with discrete historical periods. Our colloquium, “The Holocaust and the Middle Ages,” seeks to reexamine Jewish history as a multi-layered problem of narrative and conceptualization, in which deeply interested anti-Jewish narratives from the premodern world form points of explosive contact with modern literary and historical modes of analysis. Part of our work is to examine how later historical lenses, such as the interests of post-Reformation history and the consuming project of Holocaust history, have substantially dictated the terms of modern understanding of Jewish-Christian relations, often with distorting effects. At the same time, medieval paradigms of religious conflict continue to operate as the unacknowledged foundations for contemporary efforts to think about problems of political conflict rooted in religious difference.

Our objective is to bring together a small group of scholars and encourage significant interdisciplinary dialogue between medievalists and specialists in later fields, including particularly Reformation history and Holocaust studies. In doing so, we hope to move beyond generalities about the evolution of Western patterns of religious conflict to gain critical purchase on the ways in which our narratives for thinking about these problems are deeply imbricated in the assumptions, needs, and theories at work within discrete moments of historical thought.

For more information, please visit our website (www.medren.pitt.edu) or contact the Director, Professor Jennifer Waldron (jwaldron@pitt.edu).

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Lecture -- Examining the Effectiveness of Method of Instruction and Teacher- and Learner-Led Discourse in Morphosyntactic Development
Lorraine Denman (French & Italian)
12:00 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Linguistics
Conference -- Europe and the Arab Spring: A Mediterranean Dialogue
Neil Doshi (French & Italian), Jackie Smith (Sociology), Mark Haas (Political Science, Duquesne University), Nico Slate (History, Carnegie Mellon University), Ronald Judy (English), Sadia Abbas (Rutgers), Ahmed Jdey (University of Manouba, Tunisia)
(All day)
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
adelnore@pitt.edu

The events collectively described as the “Arab Spring” are marked, at the local level, by the invention of novel modes of social and political action. On a transnational scale, these events are reshaping global alliances and raising pressing questions about the relationships between international political institutions and social movements driving change in North Africa and the Middle East. In the context of this rapidly evolving political landscape, this conference considers the implications of the Arab Spring for European politics and cultures. As a way of promoting a broad and interdisciplinary dialogue, the conference sets the Mediterranean, conceived of as an “in-between” space of multiple cultural flows, as its conceptual center.

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Lecture -- Holocaust Survivor Testimony
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
European Studies Center
Hillel-JUC, Jewish Studies Program
Exhibit -- International Holocaust Memorial Day Name Reading
(All day)
William Pitt Union, Front Lawn
European Studies Center
Hillel-JUC, Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Seminar -- World History: Something new under the sun? Glimpses of the U.S.-American development
Katja Naumann (University of Leipzig)
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
3703 WW Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
World History Center
Katie Jones
1-412-624-3073
joneskh@pitt.edu

Did World History arise suddenly in the late-20th-century U.S., either because of individuals such as William McNeill or movements such as the World History Association? Or did world history arise more gradually throughout the 20th century through rethinking of universal and Eurocentric histories?

Katja Naumann takes the latter approach, emphasizing the gradual establishment of world-historical criteria from 1920 to 1970, for instance through “general education.”

In Person:
3703 WW Posvar Hall
Reception to follow

Live Online:
Link from the
World History Center at:
http://www.worldhistory.pitt.edu

Panel Discussion -- Falkland/Malvinas Anniversary Panel
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Luis Bravo or Allyson Delnore
bravo@pitt.edu or adelnore@pitt.edu

Various speakers from the UK and Argentina meet through teleconference to talk about the Falkland/Malvinas conflict, then and now.

Saturday, April 14th, 2012

Film/Panel Discussion -- The Queen
Stephen Frears (Director), Colin MacCabe (Film Studies)
6:00 pm
Alumni Hall Auditorium, 7th floor
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Film Studies Program
Vladimir Padunov, Jennifer Florian
412-624-6564 (Florian)
padunov@pitt.edu

Screening of THE QUEEN will be introduced by Director, Stephen Frears. Q&A session with Colin MacCabe.

Known for making provocative, stylized, and tightly budgeted films about people living on society's social and/or sexual fringes,
British director Stephen Frears is renowned as one of his country's most vibrant and recognizable filmmakers. Regarding his
tendency to make films that branch into unfamiliar territory, Frears has said that he likes "making films about different cultures...I'm interested in things that I've never encountered before. I try to put myself in the audience's position." Born in Leicester, Frears studied law at Cambridge University before turning to the arts. He became involved with London's Royal Court Theatre, where he served as an assistant to director Lindsay Anderson and to actor Albert Finney. He started his career in the film industry as an assistant director to Karel Reisz, with whom he worked from 1966 until 1972.

Scripted by Peter Morgan, 2006's THE QUEEN took a comic-yet-sympathetic look at the P.R. nightmare that
ensued after Princess Diana's death in 1997. Bolstered by Helen Mirren's universally acclaimed work as Queen
Elizabeth II, the film enjoyed a healthy arthouse run through awards season, when Frears found himself the recipient
of countless Best Director nominations from critics' organizations, as well as the Golden Globe Awards.

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Lecture -- Francesco Mochi and the Edge of Tradition
Estelle Lingo (Art History, University of Washington)
4:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 202
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History of Art and Architecture, The Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Prevailing accounts of the development of baroque sculpture take for granted the centrality of Gianlorenzo Bernini without probing the historical processes that led to the dominance of his art. The book Dr. Estelle Lingo is preparing takes the self-consciously ambitious sculptures of Bernini’s older contemporary, the Tuscan Francesco Mochi (1580-1654), as the entry point for an inquiry into the historical and cultural forces driving the transformation of sculpture in the first half of the seventeenth century. Mochi’s early biographer Giovanni Battista Passeri reported that the sculptor “always wanted to show himself a rigorous imitator of the Florentine manner.” Mochi’s determination to carry forward a Florentine and Michelangelesque tradition, while reconciling it with post-Tridentine religious imperatives, produced an extreme tension in his art that resulted in some of the most breathtaking sculptures of the century—though ultimately fracturing his career. In this lecture Dr. Lingo will present new work on Mochi’s highly unusual bronze equestrian monuments to Ranuccio I and Alessandro Farnese in Piacenza. The sculptures’ distinctive features, Lingo will argue, point to Mochi’s reflection upon Piacenza’s political circumstances and reveal unexpected aspects of the sculptor’s commitment to the Florentine tradition in a post-Tridentine climate of reform and censure.

Estelle Lingo is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Washington. She specializes in early modern European art, especially sculpture. Her first book, François Duquesnoy and the Greek Ideal (Yale, 2007), examined seventeenth-century Flemish sculptor François Duquesnoy and his pursuit in Rome of a modern artistic practice in "the Greek manner." The study reconstructs the understanding of Greek art from 1550 to 1650 and the contributions of Duquesnoy's circle to the coalescence of the Greek ideal within European culture. This seventeenth-century vision of Greek art is shown to have formed the basis of Johann Joachim Winckelmann's early understanding of the formal perfections of Greek sculpture, overturning the longstanding assumption that no meaningful distinction between ancient Greek and Roman art was made prior to Winckelmann's work. Her current book project focuses on the Tuscan sculptor Francesco Mochi (1580-1654); the study takes Mochi's sculptures as the entry point for an inquiry into the historical and cultural forces reshaping sculpture at the beginning of the seventeenth century. Other research interests include Caravaggio, Gian Paolo Panini's Gallery Views, and the Italian perspective on the Grand Tour.

This talk is sponsored by the Department of the History of Art and Architecture and co-sponsored by the Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Lecture -- THE BANNED FILMS OF 1965-66 AND THE IRONIES OF EAST GERMAN FILM HISTORY
Stephen Brockmann (CMU)
3:00 pm
David Lawrence Hall 105
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Film Studies Program
Vladimir Padunov
412-624-6564
padunov@pitt.edu

Stephen Brockmann is president of the German Studies Association and Professor of German at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the author, most recently, of A Critical History of German Film (2010), as well as of Nuremberg: The Imaginary Capital (2006), German Literary Culture at the Zero Hour (2004), and Literature and German Reunification (1999). In 2007 he won the DAAD Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in German and European Studies/Humanities. From 2002-2007 he was the managing editor of the Brecht Yearbook.

In the event of an evacuation, the talk will move to WWPH, room 1700.

Lecture -- The Hidden Qualifiers of Globalization
Dr. Leslie Sklair (London School of Economics, Sociology)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
1700 WW Posvar Hall
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Department of Sociology, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Pittsburgh Social Movements Forum

The debate around globalization is entering a new and more mature phase reflected in the fact that it is now generally accepted that we live in an era of globalization. However, the concept is used in a bewildering variety of ways. This talk will offer a distinction between generic, capitalist, and alternative globalizations. Globalization in a generic sense is too often confused with its dominant actually existing type, capitalist globalization, which undermines the emancipatory potential of alternative globalizations and generates crises of class polarization and ecological unsustainability. In response, Sklair offers some key principles of a post-capitalist alternative form of democratic socialist globalization, based on networks of sustainable consumer-producer cooperatives.

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Lecture -- Should Turkey Integrate its Disaster Management with the EU
Burcak Erkan, Middle East Technical University (METU)
12:00 pm
Pittsburgh Athletic Association, President’s Room
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

B. Burcak Basbug-Erkan is an assistant professor of Statistics at the Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara. She acts as the director of the METU Disaster Management Research and Implementation Centre since 2008. She holds a B.Sc. in statistics, METU, a M.Sc. degree in statistics, University of Warwick, the UK and a Ph.D. in statistics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, the UK. Her main research interest is disaster risk management, extreme event modelling, insurance and actuarial analysis and financial risk management of disaster losses. She teaches disaster risk management, linear models, insurance and actuarial analysis, probability and stochastic processes.

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Lecture -- From Filmer and Locke to Burke and Gibbon: Cambridge Histories of Political Thought, 1950 – 2010
J.G.A. Pocock (Johns Hopkins)
4:30 pm
Holiday Inn University Center, Panther Room
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, The Eighteenth Century Studies Program, The History Department, The Humanities Center, The Philistinian Society, The University Honors College
Jayson Myers, Michael Elofer
jaywillardmyers@gmail.com, michael.elofer@gmail.com

Next Wednesday (April 11), the Society and Honors College will proudly play host to a prominent intellectual historian of our generation: J.G.A. Pocock, author of Ancient Constitution and the Feudal Law, Machiavellian Moment, and a multi-volume work on Edward Gibbon. An emeritus professor at Johns Hopkins, Pocock is noted for developing a novel approach to the study of history often referred to as the Cambridge School of intellectual history. His work encompasses a broad range of intellectual endeavors, including not only history, but also political science, philosophy, and literature. Professor Pocock will lecture at 602 Cathedral of Learning at 4:00 PM, and we'd love for you to come along and help Pitt show its support for history as an intellectual exercise.

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza & Politics: "Legal Professional Privilege: Comparing Different Approaches Within the United States and the European Union"
Matt Zwick (Law School) and David Rosenberg
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
adelnore@pitt.edu

Matt Zwick, a student at the Law School, and local attorney David Rosenberg will present a paper they co-authored, entitled "Legal Professional Privilege: Comparing Different Approaches Within the United States and the European Union."

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Lecture -- 'EVERYTHING WAS STRANGE AND NEW’: THE WORLD WAR II EVACUATION OF BRITISH CHILDREN
Lee Talley (Rowan University)
4:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, 324
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Children’s Literature Program, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Pittsburgh Consortium for Adoption Studies
mjg4@pitt.edu, mnovy@pitt.edu

Dr. Talley’s talk is part of a book-length project on the evacuation and children’s literature that has won grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Children’s Literature Association, and the ALAN Foundation.

Dr. Lee Talley is Associate Professor of English at Rowan University where she teaches Victorian and children’s literature. She edited the Broadview edition of Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and has most recently published in Children’s Literature and Keywords for Children’s Literature (edited by Philip Nel and Lissa Paul).

Lecture -- Prosodic Information in L2 (German & English) Comprehension and Production
Carrie Jackson (Penn State)
9:30 am
408 LRDC
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Linguistics, Learning Research & Development Center
Natasha Tokowicz
Tokowicz@pitt.edu

From the earliest stages of language processing, people use prosodic information in word recognition and to predict and construct the syntactic structure of an utterance in their native language (L1) (e.g., Eckstein & Friederici, 2006; Friederich et al., 2004; Isel et al., 2005; Pauker et al., 2011; Steinhauer, 2003; see also Cutler et al., 1997; Wagner & Watson, 2010, for two reviews). Recently, researchers have begun to explore how prosodic and syntactic information interact in language processing among second language (L2) speakers (e.g., Dekydtspotter et al.,2008; Fernandez 2005, 2010; Fultz, 2007; Schmidt-Kassow et al., 2011). In this talk I will present findings from several recent studies in my lab that contribute to this line of research. In the first study we used a sentence-level gating task to demonstrate that English L2 learners of German recognize the importance of prosodic phrasing to predict sentence length in the L2, although their ability to do so is influenced by L2 proficiency and language environment (immersed vs. non-immersed context). In a second study we show that more proficient English L2 learners of German and German L2 learners of English use prosodic cues (pitch and duration) to disambiguate temporarily ambiguous sentences in an oral production task in both of their languages, but that neither group of L2 learners fully transfers these acoustic cues to disambiguation from their L1 to their L2. In a third study we investigate how cross-linguistic differences in lexical stress modulate cognate effects in L2 word naming among English L2 learners of German.

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Lecture -- 2012 Jean Monnet Symposium "Empires of the Past and Present: Is the EU a New Empire?"
Patrick Manning, Martha Chaiklin, and Peter Karsten, Magali Gravier, Josep Colomer and Joshua W. Walker
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Panther Room, Holiday Inn University Center
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
the EUCE of the University of Wisconsin - Madison, World History Center
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

The 2012 Jean Monnet Symposium hosted by the European Union Center of Excellence and European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh will bring together historians and political scientists to discuss empires old and new. Its goal is to advance the current discussion of how to define empire, look at how empires have defined themselves in the past, and build upon our understanding of historical empires to refine new categories of analysis applicable to the European Union of the present. Featured presenters include Patrick Manning and Daniel Bisbee, Martha Chaiklin, and Peter Karsten from the Department of History at the University of Pittsburgh; along with Magali Gravier (Copenhagen Business School), Josep Colomer (George Washington University), and Joshua W. Walker (German Marshall Fund).

Co-sponsor: World History Center

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Lecture -- Popes, Pirates, Espionage and Galley Slaves: Vasari's Lepanto Frescoes in the Sala Regia of the Vatican Palace
Rick Scorza (Resident Research Scholar at the Morgan Library, New York)
4:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 202
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of French and Italian, Department of History, Department of History of Art and Architecture, The Humanities Center, The Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The great naval Battle of Lepanto of 1571 in which the Turkish armada was devastated by the combined fleet of the Papacy, Venice, and Spain was an event of enormous symbolic as well as military importance to the Catholic Church, because it briefly gained for the Christian Alliance control of most of the Mediterranean, temporarily eradicating the threat of the “infidel”. Several Italian and Spanish artists depicted the battle but none so splendidly as Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574) in the Sala Regia of the Vatican Palace. Despite its prominent location in the administrative heart of the papacy and the fame of Vasari, the literature on this huge fresco cycle was scant before Dr. Scorza published two recent articles. Dr. Scorza will explain this cycle with reference to the literary and visual sources available to Vasari when he painted it, ranging from prints, drawings of Venetian galleys which were smuggled to Rome, and above all the beautifully sculpted bronze medals commemorating the victory which were circulated by the Papal mint. The lecture will also discuss the plight of enslaved oarsmen, and how a former Christian galley slave in Muslim hands rose to become captain and ultimately Grand Admiral of the Turkish fleet, having totally outwitted his opposite number at Lepanto and returned triumphant to Istanbul with the battle standard of the Knights of Malta. Within three years Uluch Ali - a renegade Christian - regained Turkish dominance of the Mediterranean.

Dr. Scorza took his M Phil from the Warburg Institute in the Survival of the Classical Tradition and then completed a PhD in Art History at the Warburg. He has published significant articles on a variety of topics in The Burlington Magazine, the Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, and elsewhere. He has also contributed to exhibition catalogues, most recently for the Giorgio Vasari exhibition in Arezzo celebrating the 500th anniversary of Vasari’s birth. He has given papers in several international conferences, including one titled “The Iconography of Slavery.”

This talk is sponsored by the Department of the History of Art and Architecture and co-sponsored by the Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Humanities Center, the History Department, and the Department of French and Italian.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- White Collar Blues: Immaterial Labor and its Discontent
Sabine Von Dirke (German)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center

Colloquium on Germany, Sabine Von Dirke (German), "White Collar Blues: Immaterial Labor and its Discontent,” with responses from Stephen Brockmann (Carnegie Mellon) and Lisa Brush (Sociology).

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

Information Session -- Career and Internship Opportunities with the U.S. Dept. of State
Tom Armbruster Senior, Foreign Service Officer, Diplomat in Residence, City College of New York
1:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

INFORMATION SESSION: Career and Internship Opportunities with the U.S. Dept. of State

Tom Armbruster
Senior Foreign Service Officer
Diplomat in Residence
City College of New York

Date: April 4th, 2012
Time: 1:00
Place: 4130 Posvar Hall

Come see how you can contribute to and join Secretary Clinton’s foreign policy professionals who manage America’s relations with the world. The Foreign Service offers the opportunity for public service, challenge, lifelong learning, foreign language study, and the chance to live and work overseas. On Wednesday, April 4, Senior Foreign Service Officer Tom Armbruster, most recently U.S. Consul General in Vladivostok, Russia, will present a discussion on State Department internships, both in American embassies and consulates abroad, and at State Department headquarters in Washington. Mr. Armbruster will also describe the process for becoming a Foreign Service Officer and the 13 dimensions that successful candidates demonstrate. Foreign Service officers serve in these career tracks: Consular – touching the lives of others through American citizen service and visa adjudications; Management – making diplomacy work and keeping our Embassies and Consulates running; Economic – promoting economic partnerships, free markets and trade; Public Diplomacy – explaining American values and policies through speakers, exchanges, and cultural programming; Political - analyzing political events and advising Washington and the “country team” at the Embassy, headed by the Ambassador.

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Panel Discussion -- Making International Studies Work for You
EUCE/ESC Alumni Panelists: Christopher Burdick, Benjamin Keller, Carrie Weintraub
1:00 pm
4130 WWPH
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Join us on Tuesday, April 3rd as three alumni of the European Studies Center discuss how their interests in
Foreign language and international studies have shaped their postgraduate lives. Panelists include Christopher Burdick, Policy Advisor for the U.S. Treasury; Benjamin Keller – lawyer for DLA Piper in N.Y.C.; Carrie Weintraub, International Relations graduate from the London School of Economics. Some of the issues to be discussed include: pursuing graduate studies in Europe, preparing for law/graduate school, the importance of networking, what it’s like working for law firms and/or the government, and what tips and suggestions they would offer undergraduates in European or international studies programs now. International Studies and pre law counselors from the Career Center will also be available to answer questions and provide information about resources and planning strategies. If you have questions about this event, please contact Steve Lund, Assistant Director of the European Studies Center, at slund@pitt.edu, 412-6248-7422.
Sponsored by: European Union Center of Excellence & European Studies Center

Friday, March 30th, 2012

Lecture -- Biography in Musical Scholarship Today
Glenda Dawn Goss (Sibelius Academy)
4:00 pm
132 Music Building
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Music

Biography – the story of a person’s life – is one of the most popular types of literature today. Yet biography also holds an important place in scholarship. Biographies invite us to consider what effect, if any, an individual may have on the larger course of events. Biographies of creative personalities bring up the further question of whether connections exist between a life and times and an individual’s music, art, or literary works and if so, what those connections might be.

In this presentation Prof. Glenda Dawn Goss considers aspects of writing musical biography, using the life of Jean Sibelius (1865–1957) as a case in point. She will discuss such questions as principles of writing biography, the qualifications of a biographer, the degree to which the wider context of a composer’s life belongs to serious biographical study, and, perhaps most important, how biography can contribute to our understanding of musical works.

Glenda Dawn Goss is an author and music historian with special interests in music and culture, early modernism, and European-American points of cultural contact. Formerly professor of musicology at the University of Georgia, she has served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Sibelius critical edition, for which she edited the four-volume Kullervo symphony and supervised other volumes. Currently, she is teaching in the doctoral program of the Sibelius Academy. Prof. Goss has produced an award-winning guide to Sibelius research, two scholarly editions of the composer’s letters, the first reception study of Sibelius, and a Sibelius Companion. Her recent biography, Sibelius: A Composer’s Life and the Awakening of Finland (University of Chicago Press, 2009) received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award in 2010.

Seminar -- "Towards A New Comparative Literature"
Su Fang Ng (Oklahoma)
12:30 pm
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of English (Carnegie Mellon University), Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Pittsburgh Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, The Humanities Center
Professor Jennifer Waldron
jwaldron@pitt.edu

The pre-circulated text for discussion in this seminar will be Professor Ng's forthcoming article, "Dutch Wars, Global Trade, and the Heroic Poem:
Dryden's Annus Mirabilis (1666) and Amin's Sya'ir Perang Mengkasar (1670)." The essay is attached.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ng is Associate Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma.
She specializes in early modern literature with a secondary interest in postcolonial literatures. Her book, _Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England_ (Cambridge University Press, 2007), examines how the putatively conservative analogy between state and family was used for radical political ends. Her second book project, "Global
Renaissance: Early Modern Classicism and Empire from the British Isles to the Malay Archipelago," explores how Greek and Roman models of empire became part of native histories of the early modern maritime kingdoms of England and in Southeast Asia.

Symposium -- “Europe: East & West” Undergraduate Research Symposium
8:30 am - 3:30 pm
William Pitt Union
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

“Europe East & West” Undergraduate Research Symposium
Symposium Date: March 30, 2012

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities in the region with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus. After the initial submission of papers, selected participants are grouped into panels according to their research topics. The participants then give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Conference -- Seventh Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union, 2012
(All day)
PAA
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association
EUSA
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu
http://www.ucis.edu/euce

The Seventh Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union will welcome graduate students from around the world to present the research on "Crisis, Cooperation, and Change in the EU."

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Film -- A Suitcase Full of Chocolate
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Department of History, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, Film Studies Program, German Department, Jewish Studies Program, Music Department, The Humanities Center, The Pittsburgh Jewish Film Forum, Women's Studies Program, World History Center
$9 - general $8 - 65 and older and full-time college students with valid ID $7 - groups of 12+ (group tickets must be purchased in advance) $5 - 18 and under

2012 JFilm Festival
Pittsburgh Premiere
Director: Lincoln Mayorga
2011, USA, 93 minutes
Russian and English with subtitles

Lincoln Mayorga's poignant documentary tells the remarkable story of Sofia Cosma, a child prodigy, born in Latvia, who won renown in a Viennese piano competition in 1933. She witnessed Hitler's invasion of Austria in 1938 and was forced to return home where she spent seven years in a Soviet prison. Cosma’s indomitable spirit, humor, and love of music made it possible for her to move beyond her tragic past and embrace a full life, including a celebrated concert career. Director and Concert Pianist Lincoln Mayorga will speak and play following the film.

Sponsored by The University of Pittsburgh: Dean, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences; Film Studies Program; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies, Dietrich School; Dean, University Honors College; European Union Center of Excellence/European Studies Center; Russian & East European Studies Center; Women’s Studies Program; World History Center; History Department; Jewish Studies Program; Humanities Center; Music Department; German Department

Lecture -- Speaking Transnationally: Early Modern European Cross-Cultural Exchanges with Islamic Southeast Asia
Su Fang Ng (Oklahoma)
4:30 pm
Giant Eagle Auditorium, Baker Hall A51 Carnegie Mellon University
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of English (Carnegie Mellon University), Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Pittsburgh Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, The Humanities Center

"You taught me language, and my profit on't/ Is, I know how to curse," thus Shakespeare's Caliban accused his master Prospero of linguistic colonialism. But how accurate was this picture of transnational communication? When Europeans entered the sphere of the Indian Ocean, in what language or languages did they speak? This paper considers early modern European translingual exchanges with Southeast Asia, the aim of European long-distance voyaging as the ultimate source of sought-after spices, examining in particular the role of Malay, a lingua franca of the spice trade, as a global language.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ng is Associate Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma.
She specializes in early modern literature with a secondary interest in postcolonial literatures. Her book, _Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England_ (Cambridge University Press, 2007), examines how the putatively conservative analogy between state and family was used for radical political ends. Her second book project, "Global Renaissance: Early Modern Classicism and Empire from the British Isles to the Malay Archipelago," explores how Greek and Roman models of empire became part of native histories of the early modern maritime kingdoms of England and in Southeast Asia.

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Lecture -- Frightening Jews: Towards a Definition of Jewish Horror
Jeremy Dauber (Columbia)
12:00 pm
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Cultural Studies Program, Department of Religious Studies, Film Studies Program, German Department, Jewish Studies Program, Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program

Is there such a thing as Jewish horror? Looking at examples of what has frightened Jews over three millennia of literary history, we'll venture some conclusions.

Jeremy Dauber is the Atran Associate Professor of Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture, and Director of Columbia's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. His first book, Antonio's Devils: Writers of the Jewish Enlightenment and the Birth of Modern Hebrew and Yiddish Literature, was published in 2004 by Stanford University Press; in 2006, he and Joel Berkowitz published an anthology of their translations of landmark Yiddish plays; and in 2010, Yale University Press published his second monograph, In the Demon's Bedroom: Yiddish Literature and the Early Modern. He is the co-editor of Prooftexts: A Journal of Jewish Literature, a leading journal in the field. Dauber's research interests include older Yiddish literature, the literature of the Jewish Enlightenment, and Yiddish theater, and he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Yiddish literature, as well as courses on humor in Jewish literature and American Jewish literature. He regularly lectures on topics related to Jewish literature, history, and popular culture at the 92nd Street Y and other venues around the country. His newest book, a literary biography of Sholem Aleichem, should be available from Schocken/Nextbook press at the beginning of next year.

Lecture -- “Microstates & Macroproblems: The Problematic and Complex Relations Between the EU and European Microstates and Autonomous Territories”
Paul Adams, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4625 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of Political Science

Paul Adams is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. His research interests center around the relations between the European Union and Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, and the Microstates of Europe. He has also written articles on corporatism and comparative politics. Dr. Adams will be presenting this lecture, which is also on the program for the 2012 International Studies Association Convention in San Diego in April 2012.

Lunch will be served.

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- What’s Eastern and What’s Western in the Arabian Nights?
Ruth Bottigheimer (Stony Brook)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center

Colloquium, Ruth Bottigheimer (Stony Brook), “What’s Eastern and What’s Western in the Arabian Nights?” with responses from Susan Andrade (English) and Giuseppina Mecchia (French and Italian).

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Lecture -- Futurist Geographies: Uneven Modernities and the Struggle for Aesthetic Autonomy: Paris, Italy, Russia, 1909-1914
Harsha Ram (University of California, Berkeley)
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
1228 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, The Humanities Center
free

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Conference -- Unconventional Gas in Europe: Two Perspectives on the Impact on Energy Supply
Dr. Christian Burgsmuller and Konstantin Simonov
9:00 am - 11:00 am
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

Film/Panel Discussion -- Snow
Isaac Ergas (writer/director)
5:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Graduate School of Public Health

The main One Book One Community event for this year will be the Pittsburgh premier of Snow with writer/director Isaac Ergas and a panel discussion on the Role of Film in Public Health.

Snow is a short, live-action film based on the true story of Dr. John Snow, the father of epidemiology. The panel discussion will include:

Isaac Ergas: Writer/director and public health professional
Carl Kurlander: Writer/producer, University of Pittsburgh Film Studies Program and Steeltown Entertainment Project
Bernard Goldstein: Professor emeritus, GSPH Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
Adam Lowenstein: Associate professor, University of Pittsburgh Film Studies Program
Jeremy Martinson: Assistant professor, GSPH Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology

A reception will immediately follow this event in the Frick Fine Arts Cloister. Watch the trailer and learn more about the cast and crew on the movie's Web site.

Lecture -- Transatlantic Energy Challenges
Dr. Christian Burgsmüller, Counselor, Head of the Transport, Energy, Environment and Nuclear Affairs Section, European Union Delegation to the United States
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 WWPH
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center

Dr. Christian Burgsmüller is a career EU diplomat currently with the European External Action Service (EEAS), serving as Counselor at the EU Delegation to the U.S. in Washington, D.C. Dr. Burgsmüller studied law in Freiburg i.Br., Geneva and Cologne and worked as a trainee solicitor in Düsseldorf, Brussels, Cologne and Buenos Aires before passing the German Bar Exam in 2000 and subsequently joining the European Commission in Brussels as a career official.

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Presentation -- Pizza & Politics
GSPIA EU and the World Student Group
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
3800 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
GSPIA EU and the World Student Group
Allyson Delnore
634-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

With financial crises looming in Europe, the world is bracing for new shocks. How will it all play out? Will the euro and the European Union survive? These and many other questions engage students at the University of Pittsburgh. Join us to learn about some of the initiatives that Pitt graduate students from varying disciplines are creating to bring the EU to campus (or bring the campus to the EU)! Don’t miss out on this chance to meet colleagues who have similar research, professional or extracurricular interests in the EU. And, of course, pizza will be served.

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Lecture -- Biologische Sprachzeichen. Literatur und Naturkunde
Jörg Wesche (Augsburg)
4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
German Department
German Department
412-624-5909
grmndept@pitt.edu

Professor Wesche researches in the 17th through the 21st Centuries and is particularly interested in poetics and rhetoric, drama, and myth. The author of two monographs (Der Vers im Drama. Studien zur Theorie und Verwendung im deutschsprachigen Sprechtheater des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts. [2009] and Literarische Diversität. Abweichungen, Lizenzen und Spielräume in der deutschen Poesie und Poetik der Barockzeit. [2004]) and editor of another four volumes and numerous articles, Professor Wesche will present his recent research on literature, biology, and the transfer of knowledge.

Seminar -- Portuguese Expansion and Cross-Cultural Artistic Exchange
Mario Pereira (University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth)
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
3703 WW Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
World History Center
Katie Jones
1-412-624-3073
joneskh@pitt.edu

During the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the Portuguese court collected and commissioned objects of art from artists working in Sierra Leone. The patronage of West African art formed an important part of the visual culture of the Portuguese court and was integral to the king’s larger artistic and cultural program intended to enhance his prestige and to promote his imperial ideology to other European courts. These objects of luxury art, the product of cross-cultural interaction, participated in decisive ways to the construction of the personal mythology of the Portuguese king and to the fashioning of an iconology of royal power in Europe.

RECEPTION TO FOLLOW

Live Online:

Link online from the World History Center at:
http://www.worldhistory.pitt.edu OR link online directly at: http://mediasite.cidde.pitt.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=88ba3d5080104680a...

Workshop -- Euro Challenge Competition
8:30 am - 12:30 pm
European Union Center of Excellence
Karen Lautanen
412-648-8517
kal70@pitt.edu

On March 20, the regional Euro Challenge Competition will be held at the University of Pittsburgh. Co-sponsored by Global Solutions, WISE, and the European Union Delegation to the United States, regional high school teams will present on issues and fiscal policy regarding the Euro, the Euro Zone, and the European Union. Two teams will be selected to compete in the national Euro Challenge competition in New York City.

Saturday, March 17th, 2012

Teacher Training -- French Immersion Institute 2012
8:30 am - 1:30 pm
5200 Weslely W Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Allegheny Intermediate Unit, American Association of Teachers of French
$10
Timothy Thompson
tst@pitt.edu

French Immersion institutes are designed for middle and high school French teachers, as well as French majors to broaden their cultural understanding of current events and international studies regarding French-speaking countries, to strengthen their French listening and speaking skills, and to share strategies for the teaching of French language and culture. We will be offering the following workshop spring, 2012

Topic: "Les Elections Présidentielles et Législatives Françaises de 2012

With Jean-Dominique Le Garrec, Consul Honoraire de France and Jean Pierre Collet, Ancien Consul Honoraire de France

Program Director : Bonnie Adair-Hauck, Ph.D.
Time: 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Room: 5200 Posvar Hall
Cost: $10.00 per workshop
Includes: ACT 48 credit, workshop; continental breakfast; lunch

Pennsylvania ACT 48 credit available for participants.

*****************All activities are conducted in French*****************

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Lecture -- The Invitation to Love, From the Bible to Baudelaire
Erik Gray (Columbia)
4:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning, Room 501
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of English, Department of Philosophy

Dr. Erik Gray is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is the author of The Poetry of Indifference: From the Romantics to the Rubáiyát (Massachusetts 2005) and Milton and the Victorians (Cornell 2009), as well as the editor of Tennyson's In Memoriam (Norton 2004) and Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book 2 (Hackett 2006). He has also published articles on a range of poets including Virgil, Sidney, Donne, Milton, Pope, Gray, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, the Brownings, and Christina Rossetti. This talk is drawn from his current book project on love poetry.

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- The Clock and The Tree of Life: Contemporary Cinema Art
Terence Smith (HAA)
5:30 pm
Cathedral of Learning 1228
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Film Studies Program
Vladimir Padunov
padunov@pitt.edu

"The Clock and The Tree of Life: Contemporary Cinema Art," Pittsburgh Film Studies Colloquium

Terry Smith, FAHA, CIHA, is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Contemporary Art History and Theory in the Department of the History of Art and
Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh, and Distinguished Visiting Professor, National Institute for Experimental Arts, College of Fine Arts,
University of New South Wales. He was the 2010 winner of the Mather Award for art criticism conferred by the College Art Association (USA), and recipient of the 2010 Australia Council Visual Arts Award. During 2001-2002 he was a Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, and in 2007-8 the GlaxoSmithKlein Senior Fellow at the National Humanities Research Centre, Raleigh-Durham. From 1994–2001 he was Power Professor of Contemporary Art and Director of the Power Institute, Foundation for Art and Visual Culture, University of Sydney. He was a member of the Art & Language group (New York) and a founder of Union Media Services (Sydney). A foundation board member of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, he is currently a board member of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and a Membré Titulaire of the Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art.

For more information about Terrence Smith, please visit http://www.haa.pitt.edu/person/terry-smith.

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh • Film Studies Program

Lecture -- The Art Collection of Christina of Sweden (1626-1689): Cleopatra rediscovered
Enzo Borsellino, University ‘Roma Tre’
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
202 Frick Fine Arts Building
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

"The Art Collection of Christina of Sweden (1626-1689): Cleopatra rediscovered"
Enzo Borsellino, University ‘Roma Tre’

A XVI century marble statue representing a nude Cleopatra was hidden and forgotten for more than a century in the attic of Corsini Palace in Rome, formerly the Riario Palace. There, between 1659 and 1689, Christina of Sweden spent the end of her life, having famously decided to renounce her thrown to become Catholic and live in the city of Popes. During this time, she created a spectacular and important collection of ancient and modern art, unfortunately now dispersed worldwide. The piece in question is signed and dated 1574, a fact previously overlooked by everyone. Professor Borsellino will clarify the provenance of the statue and explain why it (fortunately) remained in the Riario-Corsini Palace until now. Long investigation has resulted in both the identification of the statue as a sculpture cited in two inventories of Christina’s art collection, where the figure was named for no reason “Venus” or “Nude woman”, and a careful reconstruction of the story of this marvelous and intriguing piece of art.

Professor Borsellino is visiting the University of Pittsburgh during the spring semester 2012 as a Distinguished Italian Fulbright Chair. He is an Associate Professor in Museology at the University ‘Roma Tre’ and has published over seventy books and articles on art history and museum studies.

This lecture made possible through generous support from the Delegation of the European Union.
University of Pittsburgh | University Center for International Studies | www.ucis.pitt.edu/euce
Requests to be added to our flyer distribution list should be sent to euce@pitt.edu.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- To the Unknown Cinemagoers: German Cinema as an Occupation Cinema
Mark Lynn Anderson (English), Lina Insana (French and Italian), and Barbara McCloskey (History of Art and Architecture)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center

Colloquium, “To the Unknown Cinemagoers: German Cinema as an Occupation Cinema,” with responses from Mark Lynn Anderson (English), Lina Insana (French and Italian) and Barbara McCloskey (History of Art and Architecture).

Lecture -- "The Euro Crisis: Some Lessons for the European Union"
Visiting Professor Kurt Riechenberg
12:00 pm
Room 113 Barco Law Building
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for International Legal Education

Kurt Riechenberg, Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, is a German lawyer and Senior Legal Secretary (Clerk) to Judge Silva de Lapuerta at the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. He joined the Court in 1983 and was Clerk to three Judges until 1998, when he became Chief of Staff to the President of the Court, a position he held until taking his current post in 2003.

Lunch will be provided.

Repeats every day until Fri Mar 16 2012 .
Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

Seminar -- Patterns of Childhood: The Children’s World War II
Katie Trumpener (Yale)
2:30 pm - 5:00 pm
1409 Cathedral of Learning
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
German Department
Sabine von Dirke
vondirke@pitt.edu

Katie Trumpener, Emily Sanford Professor of Comparative Literature and English and director of graduate studies in comparative literature at Yale University

This graduate seminar is in English and open to all graduate students.

Katie Trumpener is one of the most innovative scholars in the field of comparative cultural studies. Her research spans the modern period (the late 18th century to the present) and explores a broad range of topics, from the history of the British and European novel to Anglophone fiction (especially from Scotland, Ireland, and Canada); from European film history to visual culture and music; nationalism, regionalism, and traditionalism; literature and culture of World War I, World War II, and the Cold War; the history of children’s literature (18th century to the present); and female novelists.

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Lecture -- Mediascapes of the Cold War
Katie Trumpener (Yale)
5:00 pm
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning, Room 602
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
The Humanities Center

Lecture “Mediascapes of the Cold War” by Short-Term Fellow Katie Trumpener (Yale).

Panel Discussion -- Rule of Law Around the World II
LL.M. students
12:00 pm
Room G-12
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
School of Law

A group of this year's LL.M. students will discuss past struggles and future challenges related to the rule of law in their home countries. The second of two lectures, this event will feature discussions by Ivan Milosevic (Serbia), Cristian Minor (Mexico), Kustrim Tolaj (Kosovo), and Abeer Hashayka, Wael Lafee, and Mais Qandeel (Palestine).

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Lecture -- The Early Modern City View Re-Observed
Mark Rosen (UT-Dallas)
3:00 pm
Room 202 Frick Fine Arts
European Union Center of Excellence, European Union Studies Association
History of Art and Architecture

The gap between the art and the science involved in producing Early Modern bird’s-eye views has long puzzled historians. On a visual level, city views were posited as being oriented toward a single perspective while simultaneously opening up vast, impossibly elevated cityscapes. Frequently they included the artist–cartographer’s self-portrait within the image, often shown sketching the city from a high hilltop—as if to verify the view as something witnessed and drawn directly from life. Considering that such views were almost always products of the studio stitched together from multiple site drawings and instrument-aided measurements, why did cartographers, artists, and geographers continually play down the scientific underpinnings of the viewmaking enterprise, treating it as a realm of direct, unmediated observation? This talk traces the theoretical and visual discourses concerning the purpose of the city view in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. It will detail how measurement was translated into convincing perspectival pictures, and will further address the significant reversal that occurred in those discourses around 1600, when the emphasis upon the artist–cartographer’s transformative abilities would be replaced by a new stress upon the neutralizing power of scientific instruments.

Mark Rosen is Assistant Professor of Aesthetic Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley, and has held a National Endowment for the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Medici Archive Project in Florence as well as a two-year Samuel H. Kress Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence. He has published in The Art Bulletin, Mitteilungen des Kunsthistorischen Institutes in Florenz, Oud Holland, Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Sciences, Nuncius, and other journals. His book manuscript, The Painted Map in the Age of Print and the Era of Exploration, is currently under review.

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Lecture -- Fashion on the Edge: Portraits and Community in the Eastern Mediterranean, 14th-16th Century
Cristina Stancioiu (Oklahoma State University)
4:00 pm
Room 202 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History of Art and Architecture

Cristina Stancioiu, PhD, Visiting Assistant Professor (Oklahoma State University)

This paper addresses issues of cultural identity and cohabitation in areas at the fringes of the Byzantine and Western worlds, particularly on the formerly Byzantine islands of Cyprus, Rhodes, and Crete. I focus on dress as it was depicted in numerous commemorative portraits of Latin urban settlers and local Orthodox villagers that were painted in churches, carved on effigy tombstones, or incised on ceramic marriage vessels, to answer questions regarding portraiture, artistic production, and trade, as well as local and foreign aesthetics. Portraits were critical to the construction of community, as these memorial representations stood testimony—for generations—to the values and beliefs of people who lived in religiously and ethnically mixed environments. They are the ultimate expression of cultural identity, and reveal the endurance of Byzantine traditions and aesthetics in colonized areas.

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Pizza & Politics
Galina Zapryanova
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Allyson Delnore
412-624-5404
adelnore@pitt.edu

Trust in political institutions is one of the key elements which make representative democracies work. Trust creates a connection between citizens and representative political institutions. Democratic governments which enjoy a large degree of trust also tend to have higher degrees of legitimacy and policy efficacy. In Europe's multi-level governance structure, it is imperative to learn more about the determinants of trust in EU institutions. With the increasing salience of EU issues, are domestic proxies still a key determinant of evaluating EU institutions? Are there differences across the institutions and across the member states?

Galina Zapryanova received her PhD in April 2011 from the University of Pittsburgh. She was a Max Weber Postdoctoral Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence Italy 2010-2011. Since receiving her doctorate, s