Upcoming Events

Friday, October 31

Lecture -- Greek, Sanskrit and Marriage: Past and Future Reflections
Joshua Katz
3:00 pm
125 Frick Fine Arts
European Studies Center
Department of Classics

Widely published in the languages, literatures, and cultures of the ancient world, Dr. Katz is interested above all in the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European and in etymology, which he views as part of the history of ideas.
Among the organizations from which he has received awards and fellowships are the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Science Foundation; he is especially pleased to have won, at Princeton, both the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award.

Thursday, November 6

Film -- Leipzig in the Fall (Leipzig im Herbst) (1989)
Andreas Voigt, Film Director
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
G-24 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Department of German, Film Studies Program, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and The Dietrich..., World History Center
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

Considered to be the most comprehensive documentation of events surrounding the 1989 Monday demonstrations in Leipzig, this film highlights the centerpiece of the citizens' movement that led to the fall of the Wall. As the only professional team able to film in Leipzig at the time, demonstrators were interviewed, as well as members of the citizens’ rights movement, officials and bystanders in East Germany’s peaceful revolution. Film Director Andreas Voigt will attend the screenings of his films November 7-8. A discussion with the director will directly follow the screening.

Friday, November 7

Film -- Last Year Titanic (Letztes Jahr Titanic) (1991)
Andreas Voigt, Film Director
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
324 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Film Studies Program, Sponsored by the European Union Center of Excellence &..., the Department of German, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and The Dietrich..., World History Center
Free.
euce@pitt.edu

On November 9, 1989 Americans tuned into the nightly news to watch anchorman Tom Brokaw’s reports from West Germany. The Berlin Wall was coming down after 28 years as a symbol of the Cold War between East and West. On November 11, 2014, in recognition of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, the European Union Center of Excellence and European Studies Center will host a roundtable panel of Pittsburghers who witnessed this momentous event. Audience participation is welcome.

Tuesday, November 11

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Colorblind Cats and Local Nationalists: Tourism and Two Kinds of Homeland in Austria and Hungary, 1930-1938
Andrew Behrendt, PhD Student, Department of History
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of History

Hungarian tourism promoters in the 1930s gnashed their teeth in frustration at a sluggish domestic travel market. In their minds, Hungarians were disloyal and ungrateful tourists, ignorant of their country and therefore unwilling to spend their vacations "at home" rather than abroad. The solution, these promoters decided, was to appeal to Hungarians' sense of patriotism and guilt them into traveling. But in neighboring Austria, another post-imperial country with its own struggles to stimulate tourism, such arguments were nowhere to be found. Austrians, it seems, did not need to be goaded into "seeing Austria first." What explains this disparity? In part, it has to do with two different visions of "homeland," one which defined the nation as an expression of local identity (and vice versa), and another that saw the state belonging to a single, fixed nation awaiting "discovery." This talk, adapted from a chapter of Mr. Behrendt's dissertation-in-progress, proposes that a comparison of these cases helps us to a better understanding of how societies adapting to the end of empire have (re-)imagined the idea of "home" as the national and regional boundaries changed around them.

Panel Discussion -- 25th Anniversary of the Fall of the Wall Panel
Ronald Linden, Professor, Department of Political Science; Steve Sokol, President and CEO, World Affairs Council; Gregor Thum, Associate Professor, Department of History; Katja Wezel, DAAD Visiting Professor of History; and Karen Lautanen, Director of Development, Andy Warhol Museum
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Film Studies Program, the Department of German, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and The Dietrich..., World History Center
euce@pitt.edu

On November 9, 1989 Americans tuned into the nightly news to watch anchorman Tom Brokaw’s reports from West Germany. The Berlin Wall was coming down after 28 years as a symbol of the Cold War between East and West. On November 11, 2014, in recognition of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, the European Union Center of Excellence and European Studies Center will host a roundtable panel of Pittsburghers who witnessed this momentous event. Audience participation is welcome.

Tuesday, December 2

Workshop -- High School Model EU
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
kal68@pitt.edu

The EUCE/ESC will be hosting the 2014 High School Model EU, which allows students the opportunity to participate in a simulation of a recent European Council meeting. For more information, please contact EUCE/ESC Assistant Director for External Affairs, Kate Bowersox, at kal68@pitt.edu.

Friday, March 27

Conference -- Graduate Student Conference: Still United? The EU through Enlargement, Crisis, and Transformation
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

In 2005 Mark Leonard postulated, "Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century.” Ten years later, the EU has seen the rejection of European Treaty, stalled enlargement, the inability of European soft power to affect the Arab spring, a weak response to Russian dismantling of Georgia and Ukraine, and the Eurozone crisis. The rise of nationalist parties threatens the very integrity of the Union. In contrast, the ECB has responded to the crisis with concerted action, Croatia joined the Union as the 28th member, and the final institutional changes of the Lisbon Treaty are taking effect. After such a tumultuous decade, is there still cause for optimism regarding the European project? The Organizing Committee of the Tenth Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union welcomes submissions from all disciplines and topics including, but not limited to, EU politics, governance, economics, history, security studies, institutions and behavior studies, as well as policy, enlargement, immigration, development, trade, and foreign policy. Papers addressing the theme of the conference will receive special consideration.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: November 21, 2014

Abstracts should be 250-300 words in length. Preference will be given to abstracts that clearly specify the research design of the paper, including its theoretical approach and methods. Abstracts must be submitted on-line at http://www.eustudies.org/. Please also upload a current CV with your submission. Participation is limited to authors enrolled in degree-granting graduate or professional programs at the time of the conference. Housing is provided for accepted conference participants

The University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh houses one of the largest and most complete archives of primary and secondary documents on the European Union, dating back to the beginnings of the European Coal and Steel Community. Conference presenters are given access to the archive for research during their stay.