Events in UCIS

Monday, October 16 until Saturday, October 21

(All day) Cultural Event
International Week Service Project
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

We will be collecting Panther Funds for the South Hills Interfaith Movement (SHIM). SHIM provides a variety of supplies to refugees in the greater Pittsburgh area. These funds will be collected all week in the Kimbo Gallery of the William Pitt Union, at the Food Trucks event, and at the weekly Thursday Farmer's Market outside the Union.

Friday, October 20 until Saturday, October 21

8:00 am Conference
(des)articulaciones 2017--6th Graduate Student Conference
Location:
CL, University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Office of the Provost, John Beverley, and the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Organization, Dean for Graduate Research and the Humanities Center and Cultural Studies
See Details

http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/graduate/international-grad-student-conference

(des)articulaciones 2017: (De)conceptualizations: Beyond Identity, Coloniality and the Subaltern

Date: October 20-21, 2017

Keynote Speakers: Lurgio Gavilán and Nelson Maldonado-Torres

Frederic Jameson proposed that third world texts should be read as national allegories, considering that politics and libidinal dynamics are equally involved in mapping out the whole. Behind this view lies the idea that these texts only function as displays of a collective reality by way of an individual and subjective reality. In addition, this notion reinforces the fact that national allegories are based on the idea of identity as a fixed and hereditary entity which does not change with time, when in reality, identities are cultural constructs which we define in our relations with others, i.e., fluid constructions which are ever changing and in progress. Identity interpreted contrary to a universalist and essentialist view, as Stuart Hall affirms, is a “structured representation which only achieves its positive through the narrow eye of the negative. It has to go through the eye of the needle of the other before it can construct itself.” Therefore, the matter here, following Levinas, is one of accepting alterity as a constitutive part of the subject while, on the other hand, not falling into a stereotyped vision of reality. Achille Mbembe says that, “in Foucault’s terms, racism is above all a technology aimed at permitting the exercise of biopower, that old sovereign right of death.” In other words, the form of looking at the other is defined by a peculiarity and legitimacy that stems from violence and murder.

We propose to think about theory from various angles, which take into account crises of national allegory, failures of identity and thinking about Latin America as a homogenous block. By revising the core ideas proposed, we allow ourselves to reflect on the extent to which the production of knowledge can be realized inside, and outside of, the theoretical, political and social debate. To this end, we call for interdisciplinary approaches that, by means of alternative theories and/or empirical practices, try to place themselves outside of the established theoretical frameworks in order to enrich them with new reflections and hypotheses. Concepts of identities, coloniality, and the subaltern, amongst others, are standard in the Academy. Thus, our proposal is not only to rethink them, but also to furnish them with new meaning or unveil their methodological gaps.

Abstracts can focus on the following topics (although other related topics are welcome):

The transformation of local, national and international identities (transpacific and transatlantic studies)
The recent political developments and their effect on the perceptions of the Other and the sense of self-identity
Questions of race, discrimination and racism in the global stage
“Frontier” literature and related works
Latino writers in the United States of America
Indigenismo and political struggles
Theories of decolonization, the establishment of identity labels and the process of identity formation itself
Dictatorship, dirty war, forced disappearance and necropolitics
Ayahuasca tourism and its emerging market
Borders, drug trafficking and identity
Popular music and identities

Saturday, October 21

9:00 am Cultural Event
Pitt Make a Difference Day 2017
Location:
University of Pittsburgh, William Pitt Union, 3959 5th Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of Student Affairs (Office of PittServes)
See Details

Description
10th ANNUAL PITT MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY
This link is for University of Pittsburgh STUDENTS, STAFF, and FACULTY from the Pittsburgh campus to register for Pittsburgh's largest day of service! Alumni and regional campus attendees should contact pmadd@pitt.edu to obtain the registration link for your participation in PMADD!

All student participants have the opportunity to register with their residence hall, student organization, or can sign up as an individual to serve. By registering, you agree to participate in Pitt's largest day of service to the community at a Pittsburgh regional site to make a difference in a local community!

What are the requirements?
Attend assigned service project on 10/21/17. All students are required to report to buses at 9am and will serve until 2pm. Buses will return to campus by 3pm.
Wear appropriate attire and close toe shoes. PMADD is rain or shine.
Bring a water bottle.
Do not print your eventbrite ticket - save paper!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pitt-make-a-difference-day-2017-registratio...

12:00 pm Film
The Colors of the Mountain (93 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and International Week
See Details

LOS COLORES DE LA MONTAÑA
(90 minutes, Colombian film)

Come and enjoy a great film and some delicious Colombian empanadas!

Manuel, 9, has an old ball with which he plays football every day in the countryside. He dreams of becoming a great goalkeeper. His wishes seem set to come true when Ernest, his father, gives him a new ball. But an unexpected accident sends the ball flying into a minefield. Despite the danger, Manuel refuses to abandon his treasure... He convinces Julián and Poca Luz, his two friends, to rescue it with him. Amid the adventures and kids' games, the signs of armed conflict start to appear in the lives of the inhabitants of 'La Pradera'.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VzFHEcU070

English subtitles

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)

2:00 pm Film
Zoology (97 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and International Week
See Details

Zoology (97 minutes)
Middle-aged zoo worker Natasha still lives with her mother in a small coastal town. As she struggles for independence, she has to endure the absurd reality of her life filled with gossip spread by the women around her. She is stuck and it seems that life has no surprises for her until one day… she grows a tail.
Embarrassed at first, Natasha decides to go further with the transformation and use it as an opportunity to redefine herself as a person and as a woman. With the new “accessory” she gets access to the life that she has never experienced before – she starts a relationship with a man, who finds her attractive, she goes out and allows herself to be foolish for the first time in her life. But her second puberty eventually comes to an end and Natasha has to make a choice between reality and illusion.
Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5133392/videoplayer/vi581219865?ref_=tt_ov_vi

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)

4:00 pm Cultural Event
Jugalbandi: Hinduastani and Carnatic Concert
Location:
326 Indian Nationality Room, Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Jugalbandi is a performance in Indian classical music, especially the Hindustani classical music, that features a duet of two solo musicians. The word jugalbandi means, literally, "entwined twins."

Please join us in Pitt Sangeet's first Jugalbandi

Journey across Indian Classical Music featuring

4:00 pm Film
CHAR The No-Man’s Island (97 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
See Details

CHAR The No-Man’s Island (97 minutes)
The film revolves around Rubel, a young boy who wants to attend school, but whose financial circumstances force him to become a smuggler from India to Bangladesh. Every day, he has to cross a river that forms the border between the two countries. He stays at an island named Char which is a no-man's land and is patrolled by the border security force of both countries.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWW_5lIbk2k

Discussion with Shashank Srivastava (10 minutes)

6:00 pm Film
The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and International Week
See Details

The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)

In 2010, theatre director Ros Horin took a monumental task: to take the remarkable, intense and sometimes horrifying stories of four African refugee women and transform them into stories a transcendent work of theatre, starring the women themselves. But in Yarrie, Aminata, Yordy and Rosemary, Horin was to discover women of uncommon courage and charisma, who had passed through the worst that life could throw at them and were still determined to make their mark on the world. The women are given the power to voice the tremendous violence done to them, and transform their trauma into something cleansing, forceful and awe-inspiring. We believe this film can be an important tool to help change attitudes, deepen understanding and build empathy amongst all of us towards people who have experienced violence and trauma.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHLvWMn4N0A

6:00 pm Film
The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)
In 2010, theatre director Ros Horin took a monumental task: to take the remarkable, intense and sometimes horrifying stories of four African refugee women and transform them into stories a transcendent work of theatre, starring the women themselves. But in Yarrie, Aminata, Yordy and Rosemary, Horin was to discover women of uncommon courage and charisma, who had passed through the worst that life could throw at them and were still determined to make their mark on the world. The women are given the power to voice the tremendous violence done to them, and transform their trauma into something cleansing, forceful and awe-inspiring. We believe this film can be an important tool to help change attitudes, deepen understanding and build empathy amongst all of us towards people who have experienced violence and trauma.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHLvWMn4N0A

Discussion of the film (15 minutes)

8:00 pm Film
Screening: King of the Belgians
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 125
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

As part of the International Week film series on the theme of 'Displacement', the European Studies Center is proud to bring you the Pittsburgh premiere of the Cannes Film Festival acclaimed 'King of the Belgians'.

Trailer: http://www.kingof.be/#trailer

KING OF THE BELGIANS is a road movie in which a dormant King gets lost in the Balkans and awakens to the real world. Desperate to return home from a state visit to Istanbul when his country suffers its worst-ever political crisis, but unable to fly due to a solar storm, the King of the Belgians finds himself on a tumultuous road trip across the Balkans.

For questions, please contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

8:00 pm Film
The King of the Belgians (94 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and International Week
See Details

The King of the Belgians (94 minutes)
The King of the Belgians is on a state visit in Istanbul when his country falls apart. He must return home at once to save his kingdom. But a solar storm causes airspace and communications to shut down. No planes. No phones. With the help of a British filmmaker and a troupe of Bulgarian folk singers, the King and his entourage manage to escape over the border. Incognito. Thus begins an odyssey across the Balkans during which the King discovers the real world - and his true self.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJa5C0_CqQI

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)