Events in UCIS

Wednesday, November 1

5:00 pm Workshop
How to Asia: Chinese Brush Calligraphy
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

As part of our series How To: Asia, our social media education coordinator Bliss Hou will teach the fine art of traditional brush calligraphy. Bliss will give a demonstration and then participants will have an opportunity to write their own Chinese characters.

Xiaoxu Hou, a social media education coordinator at the Asian Studies Center, recently graduate with her master’s degree in Foreign Language Education at the University of Pittsburgh. She has a broad range of interests, such as painting, music, and traveling, especially Chinese calligraphy. She has taught workshops on calligraphy most recently at the Carnegie Library and the Pitt Chinese Calligraphy Club.

Thursday, November 2 until Saturday, November 4

(All day) Information Session
International Career Toolkit Series: Trans-Atlantic University Trip
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Join the European Studies Center to UNC to learn about graduate studies abroad at Trans-Atlantic University. Contact slund@pitt.edu for more information.

Thursday, November 2

12:00 pm Lecture
Cities as Political Construction Sites: Building Just, Livable Urban Communities in an Era of Globalization
Location:
2432 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of Sociology
See Details

Join community leaders in human rights city organizing and Professor Emeritus Peter Evans of UC Berkeley, for a discussion on local-global links. Dr. Evans is a world-renowned expert on labor, states, social movements, globalization, and development.

Friday, November 3

1:00 pm Information Session
Making it as a Freelance Journalist in Beirut
Location:
Posvar Hall 4130
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with English Department and Department of History
See Details

Eric Reidy is a 2012 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh (BPHIL International and Area Studies and History). Learn how he prepared for his unique career path and how he goes about covering some of most compelling issues of our time. Based out of Beirut, Lebanon his investigative reporting has taken him around the Mediterranean covering numerous topics in nearly a dozen countries, with a current focus on migration and refugees.

In 2016, Eric was a finalist in for a National Magazine Award and for the Kurt Schork Memorial Award for International Journalism for his work on Ghost Boat – an investigative series about the disappearance of 243 refugees in the Mediterranean Sea. Eric has written for WIRED Magazine, the New Republic, Medium.com, Foreign Policy, and VICE News, among other outlets.

5:30 pm Cultural Event
East African Cultures and Society
Location:
O'Hara Dinning Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Swahili Students Association (SSA) and African Students Organization (ASO)
See Details

Join us for the Annual Taste of East Africa event hosted by the Swahili Students Association in collaboration with the African Students Association at Pitt. The event opportunities for the pitt community to sample a variety of East African foods, see performances, and learn about the different cultures of East Africa represented by student organizations on campus. This is a wonderful platform for you to learn about the various East African cultures and learn about opportunities offered by the African Studies Program for studrying aborad in an East African country or participating in field based learning programs.

6:30 pm Performance
50 Years Maria Callas: A Musical Tribute
Location:
7th Floor Alumni Hall
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with The American-Hellenic Foundation of Western PA
See Details

Fifty years after her passing, Maria Callas remains a towering and historic Diva of opera. With her vivid interpretations, Callas succeeded brilliantly at living for her art. Soprano Aprile Millo once said, "Listening to Callas is like reading Shakespeare: You're always going to be knocked senseless by some incredible insight into humanity."

The Greek Nationality Room Committee and The American-Hellenic Foundation of Western PA present "50 Years Maria Callas: A Musical Tribute," featuring soprano Ms. Alexandra Loutsion.

The Recital Auditorium
7th Floor Alumni Hall
4227 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

A reception together with a photo, video, and art tribute to Callas will precede the main program.

Adult tickets: $50
Student tickets: $20

Please contact Sage Levy (4-6150) to reserve tickets.

Friday, November 3 until Sunday, November 5

5:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Muslims and Migration Mini Course
Location:
GSC
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Muslims migrating have had a profound impact around the globe. This course will explore the social, economic, and political dimensions of Muslims on the move throughout the globe.

Friday November 3rd: 5:00pm-8:00pm
Saturday, November 4th: 8:30am-6:15pm
Sunday, November 5th: 9:00am-12:00pm

For a fill schedule and to register, visit: www.ucis.pitt.edu/global//mini-course/muslim-migration

Saturday, November 4

7:00 pm Performance
Korean Music Festival
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with Korean Association of Pittsburgh
See Details

Korean Music Festival 2017!

Sunday, November 5

1:00 pm Festival
Slovak Heritage Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pitt Student Slovak Club; Slovak Studies Program

Monday, November 6

12:00 pm Lecture
Securing Territory: States Interest and Implementation of Ethnic Land Rights in Nicaragua & Brazil
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
1:00 pm Lecture
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
3:30 pm Lecture
Social Media and Political Engagement: Conceptual and Empirical Challenges in the Study of Digitally-Enabled Participation
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Studies Association
See Details

The conceptualization and measurement of political participation has been a contentious issue vibrantly debated for more than 50 years. The arrival of digital, and in particular social, media came to add important parameters to the debate about the continuous expansion of forms of participation, complicating matters further. While interest on the use of social media for political purposes is growing, the lack of a clear conceptualization of forms and modes of participation emerging from their use is inhibiting the measurement of this type of participation. The talk will focus on the challenges posed by digitally-enabled forms of political participation and on how they can be turned into an opportunity for better understanding the impact of social media on democracy.

Sponsored by the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's 2017-18 Participation and Democracy Series.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature 2017-2018
Location:
City of Asylum (40 W. North Ave)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Osama Alomar is a prominent Syrian writer of al-quisa al-quasira jiddan, or what has been called “flash fiction.” These extremely short stories (sometimes only one or two sentences) have the appeal of a fable. Currently an exiled writer-in-residence at City of Asylum in Pittsburgh, Alomar will be conducting this session himself at City of Asylum (40 W. North Ave). Prof. Uma Satyavolu (English) will offer a lecture on Alomar's innovative form and ideas for classroom use. Books and Act 48 credit hours provided. Reception at City of Asylum.

Tuesday, November 7

8:59 am Teacher Training--Language
Pittsburgh's World Language Connections Day
Location:
Fox Chapel Area High School, 611 Field Club Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Fox Chapel Area High School is proud to announce this year's Pittsburgh World Language Connection Day, with Keynote speaker Professor Richard Donato. This is a great opportunity for world language teachers to learn about new pedagogies. Bring along your principals, curriculum directors, and administrators to learn about how to enhance your school's international programs through meaningful and fun community connections.

12:00 pm Lecture
The Ford Foundation and Brazilian Economics
Location:
4217 Wesley Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

The presentation will cover several aspects of an ongoing research project on the origins and development of economics as an academic discipline in Brazil. The institutional structure that presently characterizes research and graduate training in the field was built during the 1960s and 1970s, as part of a larger educational reform bolstered by US-Brazil cooperation agreements. The Ford Foundation was one of the cornerstones of this process, providing funds and expertise for the graduate programs created at the time. Such initiatives were ostensibly guided by the goal of ‘modernizing’ Brazilian economics, thus making it more attuned to the standards currently prevailing in the US. Working within the context of an authoritarian regime after 1964, however, the Foundation held a delicate position given how close the activities it sponsored were to policymaking, hence to the military government itself. One significant consequence was the emergence, among Ford personnel in Brazil, of a sensibility towards scholarly tolerance and openness that led the way to the strengthening of a pluralistic academic environment – a characteristic feature of Brazilian economics to this day. The presentation will discuss the origins and early development of the Brazilian graduate programs, the relationship between the Ford Foundation and the military regime, and the shift towards pluralism during the 1970s, trying to contrast the perspectives held by US and Brazilian agents involved in the process.

12:00 pm Lecture
The War in Syria: What Does it Mean for Assad to Win?
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and Ford Institute for Human Security
See Details

Since foreign of foreign-backed forces still occupy significant parts of the country, what does the dispersed battlefield mean for Syria's territorial integrity? What are Assad's political calculus and the prospects for reform in the reconstituted state? What are the tradeoffs, for the United States and others, of providing (or authorizing multilateral) reconstructive assistance? Join GSPIA, the Ford Institute for Human Security, and the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for this talk featuring Dr. Alexander Bick.

After completing a PhD in history at Princeton University, Dr. Bick joined the Obama administration. From 2012-14, he served on the Policy Planning Staff at the United States Department of State, advising Secretaries Clinton and Kerry on political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa. From 2014-16, he served as Director for Syria at the National Security Council, where he was responsible for coordinating U.S. policy and assistance programs in Syria and developing the strategy to defeat the Islamic State. In his new role as associate director and fellow for the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Dr. Bick is helping to establish a center that aims to resurrect the study of history as a core component of preparation for public service in international affairs.

5:00 pm Lecture
Putin Country: A Journey into the Real Russia
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

The longtime home of the Soviet nuclear program, the Chelyabinsk region contains beautiful lakes, shuttered factories, mysterious closed cities, and some of the most polluted places on earth. Based on her recent book Putin Country (Farrar, Straus&Giroux, 2016), Garrels charts the aftershocks of the U.S.S.R.’s collapse. Having returned again and again to Chelyabinsk, Garrels argues that the area’s new freedoms and opportunities were exciting but also traumatic. As the economic collapse of the early 1990s abated, the city of Chelyabinsk became richer and more cosmopolitan, even as official corruption and intolerance for minorities grew more entrenched. Today, as Vladimir Putin tightens his grip on power and Western sanctions continue to lower the standard of living, the local population mingles belligerent nationalism with a deep ambivalence about their country’s direction. Through it all, Garrels sympathetically charts an ongoing identity crisis. In the aftermath of the Soviet Union, what is Russia? What kind of pride and cohesion can it offer? And why does Putin command the loyalty of so many Russians, even those who decry the abuses of power they regularly encounter?

Anne Garrels has been honored with numerous journalism awards, including the Peabody and the Polk. Garrels is on the board of Oxfam America and the Committee to Protect Journalists. For almost 25 years Anne Garrels was the senior foreign correspondent for NPR, reporting from Russia and the other former Soviet republics, the former Yugoslavia, the Middle East, China, Mongolia, and Iraq. She arrived in Baghdad six months before the 2003 U.S. invasion, stayed during the U.S. bombing campaign and continued to cover Iraq for the next six years. Before joining NPR in 1986 she was chief correspondent in Moscow and Central America for ABC, and the State Department correspondent for NBC.

Putin Country (Farrar, Straus&Giroux, 2016) will be available for purchase and signing.

Wednesday, November 8

1:00 pm Career Counselling
USAID Career Talk
Location:
4341 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs
See Details

Catie Lott is currently the Director for the Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance Office at USAID/ Tanzania. Prior this posting she served as the Staff Director for the House Democracy Partnership, a bipartisan commission of the U.S. House of Representatives that works directly with 21 partner countries around the world to support the development of effective and independent legislative institutionsShe also previously held the position of Deputy Director for the USAID Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance Center comprised of more than 100 leading experts in the field of democracy promotion. As a Foreign Service Officer with USAID for more than 15 years, Ms. Lott has held postings in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. In her work overseas she has designed and managed a wide variety of multi-million-dollar programs that cross all democracy areas of expertise. Prior to joining USAID, Ms. Lott worked as a journalist for a variety of publications in the United States and Africa covering human interest stories, travel, and politics. Ms. Lott has a BA from the University of California Santa Barbara, an MA from Syracuse University, and is currently working on a PhD focused on women's political leadership.

Thursday, November 9

9:00 am Workshop
Gender Equality in Public Institutions: Monitoring Global Progress
Location:
20th Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Ford Institute for Human Security, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and United Nations Development Programme
See Details

Deputy Assistant Administrator and Deputy Director of the United Nationals Development Program, "Shining a Light on Decision-Making in Public Institutions: Reflections on SDG Data to Fuel Women's Empowerment in the Public Service" followed by a declaration of the goals of the workshops by Dr. Müge Finkel (Global Studies Center 2017-18 Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor, GSPIA), Dr. Melanie Hughes, (Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh) and the United Nations Development Program's Pelle Lütken. This event kicks off the Gender Equality in Public Institutions Workshop hosted in conjunction with the United Nations Development Program and GSPIAS' Ford Institute for Human Security.

4:00 pm Lecture
The Function of Letters to the Editor in Reform-Era Cuba
Location:
3800 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Political Science
See Details

On March 14, 2008, Granma started publication of a new section entitled Carta a la Dirrecion, which printed letters to the editor containing complaints, criticisms, and suggestions. The section rapidly grew in popularity and became the most closely read portion of the Friday paper. This talk focuses on three related questions that have theoretical relevance beyond the specific case of Cuba. First, why would the flagship newspaper in a communist regime solicit citizen letters? Second, why would some of these letters be printed? And third, why would news media seek out responses to the letters and comment on unsatisfactory responses? The talk argues that in Cuba, as in other communist regimes, published complaint letters have two functions: the simple printing of select letters facilitates the collective letting off of steam, whereas the publication of responses to the letters by the authorities that were responsible for the infractions outlined in the initial complaint allows the regime to demonstrate that it takes popular input seriously. Therefore, Cartas a la Direccion serves as a non-electoral mechanism of accountability. The talk is based on a detailed coding and analysis of all letters, responses to letters, and editorial postscripts (coletillas) published in Granma since 2008 and on interviews with journalists conducted in Havana.

5:15 pm Lecture
Roman Religion, Pisidian Practice: Votive 'Rock Art' in Southwest Anatolia
Location:
342 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of The Department of Classics and The Archaeological Institute of America
See Details

The local Anatolian horseman, sometimes called Kakasbos, and the twin hero-gods, Castor and Pollux, are among the figures featured in Hellenistic and Roman rock-cut reliefs that have been discovered in archaeological work at Pisidia. Similar reliefs have been identified in northern Lycia. This paper presents the reliefs by type and location, and takes a fresh look at their cults and iconography. As permanent votive dedications, the relief carvings play both devotional and commemorative roles. Their function and iconography also express the importance of protection. It is arguable that the divinities themselves are neither fully Greco-Roman nor fully Anatolian, and that their conflation is a uniquely local Pisidian phenomenon. The art of rock-carving, as well as the use of votive niches and 'cup marks', also point to local practices.

Dr. Tyler Jo Smith is the Director of Interdisciplinary Archaeology Program and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Architecture at the University of Virginia. Her areas of specialization include Greek and Roman pottery, vase painting, and sculpture.

Friday, November 10

1:30 pm Information Session
Pitt Panther Program on Global Energy, May 2018
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, International Business Center and Study Abroad Office along with Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business; Graduate School of International and Public Affairs; Department of Political Science;
See Details

This info session is for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students interested in study abroad opportunities to explore issues in global energy.

To be offered in May 2018, Competing Perspectives on Global Energy: From Western PA to Eastern Europe (http://abroad.pitt.edu/globalenergy) will introduce students to global business and policy questions related to natural gas and other energy resources through visits to 4 interconnected locations. Study sites for this 2-week course include Washington County, PA; Washinton, D.C.; Brussels, Belgium; and Kyiv, Ukraine. Participants will make site visits to think tanks, and various government and civic organizations and participate in lectures by local stakeholders and specialists. At the end of the course, participants will have a much broader understanding of the global impact of energy developments and more clearly understand how local activities such as those related to Marcellus Shale can have far-reaching consequences in different sectors and geographic locations.

Study Abroad Application Deadline: December 1, 2017

3:00 pm Lecture
Natural Resources and the Making of Modern Xinjiang, 1907-1962
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

This talk will focus on the central role that natural resources played in shaping Chinese state power and authority in China's far western province of Xinjiang. Based on my forthcoming book, my talk will highlight the often overlooked role played by an assortment of Chinese and Soviet state agents, as well as a wide variety of non-state actors, each of whom were seeking to stake their own claim to Xinjiang's lucrative natural resources. Their combined efforts to gain access to the region's gold, wool, petroleum, and rare minerals served to construct the foundations of Chinese state power and authority in this distant border region.

This lecture is open for public. Some refreshments will be served.

Saturday, November 11

12:15 pm Panel Discussion
Critical Conversations: Advancing Equal Access in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Location:
ASEEES National Convention, Chicago, IL
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Association for Slavic, East European and and Eurasian Studies
See Details

This event is organized at the annual convention of ASEEES and is part of a continuing conversation on inclusion and retention initiated by the Association for Diversity in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ADSEEES). We bring together students, scholars, and professionals to address issues of equal access affecting ethnic and racial minorities, members of the LGBTQ community, and people with disabilities who work in the field of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. This brown-bag is co-sponsored by the Center for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pittsburgh through the U.S. Department of Education Title VI Program. Bring your lunch and join the discussion.

For more information on presenters and the location, see https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/aseees/aseees17/index.php?cmd=On....

Sunday, November 12

12:00 pm Cultural Event
Polish Festival
Location:
Commons Room Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

POLISHFEST- FREE ADMISSION

Celebrate Polish culture with folk dance, music, Polish food, cooking demonstrations, cultural exhibitions, craft & gift markets, and more!

12:00 pm Festival
Polish Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of

Monday, November 13 until Tuesday, November 14

(All day) Conference
Electric Power Industry Conference: The Global Grid
Location:
Doubletree Hotel and Suites, One Bigelow Square, Pittsburgh, PA 15222; Energy GRID Institute at the Energy Innovation Center 1435 Bedford Avenue, Floor 1
Announced by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center on behalf of Pitt Swanson Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pitt Center for Energy, ANSYS, CannonDesign, CEPower, Direct Energy, Dominion Energy, Duquesne Light Company, Eaton, Johnson Controls, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Nayak, Pitt Ohio and Sargent
See Details

Welcome to EPIC

The Electric Power Industry Conference at the Swanson School of Engineering continues to lead the way in exploring energy production and delivery potential.

For a full conference schedule, registration, and additional details, visit http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/Sub-Sites/Conferences/EPIC/_Content/Home....

Monday, November 13

(All day) Conference
Pitt Model United Nations 2017
Location:
William Pitt Union, O'Hara Student Center
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Annual United Nations simulation event for student teams from area high schools.

5:00 pm Information Session
Global Studies Digital Portfolio Overview and Discussion
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Join us for a discussion about creating your digital portfolio, a new requirement for Global Studies students. We will discuss both technical tips for working with WordPress along with overall presentation including content and visual ideas. We will help you to consider what is the message you want to tell in terms of your global studies coursework and how you will want to convey your academic and co-curricular learning experiences and professional readiness. Information presented and open discussion led by Dr. Jared McCormick and Elaine Linn. Snacks served!

Wednesday, November 15

12:00 pm Lecture
Photographing Russia's Orient
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

With the Russian conquest of Central Asia, new techniques were introduced in the region- one of them was photography. Being a medium of modernity it was responsible for the establishment of a new visual culture, the overcoming of space and new feeling of time. Especially in an imperial context photography became important to connect the Asian periphery with the Moscow center. With an iconographic/iconological approach it is possible to analyze the genesis of the motifs that produced the knowledge of Central Asia since the first published travel logs, and their shift after the 1917 Revolution.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - European Integration through Study Abroad? 30 Years of the Erasmus Program
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

What is the power of study abroad for forging new identities? For this installment of our monthly Conversations on Europe series, we will look at the EU’s billion-dollar student and scholar exchange program called ERASMUS, which has reshaped higher education in Europe. With what results? How successful has the program been for the Europeanization of Europe’s college-aged youth? And what impact will Brexit have on the program?

Join our panel of experts to learn more. In-person or remote participation in this virtual roundtable is possible. Questions from the audience are encouraged

12:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Brown Bag Discussion on Midterm Balance of Macri's Administration and the Political Map after the Recent Elections
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Join Panoramas for an informal discussion on the results of the recent legislative elections in Argentina.

Thursday, November 16

12:00 pm Lecture
Full Democracy and Political Elites in Latin America
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Democracy is a too complex concept to be summarized in a single number that captures only electoral and/or liberal aspects. Elections and checks and balances are not enough to define a consolidated democratic regime; as a consequence, the causes of democratic strength literature has traditionally highlighted are biased towards these aspects.

This paper aims to analyze the different paths towards a full democracy, a regime that has strong liberal and electoral, but also deliberative, participatory and egalitarian components; if one of these democratic elements lacks, it's not a full democracy. Hence, I focus on institutional, socioeconomic, historical and political culture factors, and especially on the role of political elites’ attitudes, radicalism and support for democracy, to get to explain what contributes to full democracy in Latin America.

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

For decades, Kenya had been considered the hope of Africa’s democracy. Unfortunately, Kenya’s democratization seems to be accompanied by what are clearly anti-democratic features. Violence, manipulation and rigging of elections, political exclusion, intolerance and blatant attempts to close political spaces for some groups, have been on the increase. Despite the over three decades of democratization, the transition does not seem to have yielded significant changes in the institutional composition of the country, even after the promulgation of a new Constitution, which enjoyed widespread popular support. The violence that has characterized Kenya’s elections since 2007 and the opposition’s boycott of the repeat 2017 general elections, point to a democracy that is in serious trouble. Please join us as Prof. Joshua M. Kivuva, a Visiting Scholar from the University of Nairobi’s Department of Political Science and Public Administration, leads a discussion on this topic as part of the African Studies Program's Let's Talk Africa Series.

1:00 pm Performance
Daniel Beaty Live!!
Location:
O'Hara Student Center Ballroom
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Studies Center along with College of General Studies, Humanities Center, Department of English, Department of Africana Studies, Pitt Arts, Department of Political Science, Department of Theatre Arts, Department of History, Deparment of Sociology, Crow Fund and boundary 2
See Details

Actor, singer, writer, activist, and advocate of arts-based social justice education, Daniel Beaty is best known for his performance of “Knock Knock,” which has received over 17 million views on YouTube. His other work includes the one-man play Emergency (in which he performs over 40 characters), a film about Beaty’s relationship with his incarcerated father, and a collaborative project involving people affected by gangs. Exploring criminal justice reform, the struggles of incarcerated people and their families, of African-Americans across the country, and more broadly of all those affected by trauma, Beaty’s work has been acclaimed for its richness of characterization, voice, and range of emotion.
He has performed at venues from the Lincoln Center to the White House; has received several NAACP awards as well as an Obie award for writing and performance. His performances and workshops use the tools of the arts, storytelling, and trauma recovery to inspire reflection, agency, and healing. The performance is open to the public.

Following his performance, we invite faculty and other educators to join us for a workshop and discussion with the launch of a new GSC initiative, Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies. Advance registration for the discussion is required; please email Lisa Bromberg at lisarbromberg@pitt.edu to register.

4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human: Migration
Location:
601 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

This talk, prresented by Dr. Sergio Delgado Moya of Harvard University, Romance Language & Literature Department, grapples with borders as both landscapes and stages, as backgrounds against which our symbolic knowledge of migrants and migration take shape. It focuses on a long tradition in Latin American and Latinx artists and writers who subvert picturesque notions of landscape in favor of more nuanced, historically informed, politically incisive renditions of the environment.

7:00 pm Presentation
African Heritage Room Scholarship Presentation
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Come hear the 2017 African Heritage Room Committee Scholarship Winners discuss their experiences abroad!

Friday, November 17

(All day) Career Counselling
International Career Toolkit Series: Boston Career Forum 2017
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Join the Asian Studies Center at the largest career fair for Japanese-English bilinguals in Boston. Contact rookoepsel@pitt.edu for information.

12:00 pm Lecture
Migrants and Political Change in Latin America
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

This book reveals how migrants shape the politics of their countries of origin, drawing on research from the three largest diasporas in Latin America—Mexico, Colombia, and Ecuador. Luis Jiménez discusses the political changes that result when migrants return to their native countries in person and also when they send back new ideas and funds—social and economic “remittances”—through transnational networks.

Using a combination of rich quantitative analysis and eye-opening interviews, Jiménez finds that migrants have influenced areas such as political participation, number of parties, electoral competitiveness, and presidential election results. Interviews with authorities in Mexico reveal that migrants have inspired a demand for increased government accountability. Surveys from Colombia show that neighborhoods that have seen high degrees of migration are more likely to participate in local politics and also vote for a wider range of parties at the national level. In Ecuador, he observes that migration is linked to more competitive local elections as well as less support for representatives whose policies censor the media. Jiménez also draws attention to government services that would not exist without the influence of migrants.

Looking at the demographics of these migrating populations along with the size and density of their social networks, Jiménez identifies the circumstances in which other diasporas—such as those of south Asian and African countries—have the most potential to impact the politics of their homelands.

12:00 pm Colloquium
Pedagogical Technology Mini-Workshops: VoiceThread and Quizlet
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
See Details

Kyungok Joo, Assistant Instructor, Korean Language Program
Quizlet, Digital Flashcards for Vocabulary Learning. This presentation will demonstrate how to create digital flashcards to teach vocabulary to beginners in learning L2.
Vanessa Ju-Chun Wei, Acting Coordinator, Chinese Language Program
VoiceThreading 101: This presentation will cover basics on creating a VoiceThread and its pedagogical implications in a foreign language class.

2:30 pm Symposium
Cultures of Healing in Practice and the Archive: With the Participation of Chicana Playwright and Author Virginia Grise
Location:
Latin American Lecture Room - Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Library System (ULS)
See Details

This symposium, workshop, and performance asks, how do we define healing? With student presentations and a performance manifesto by Chicana playwright and author Virginia Grise, we will open conversation about the relationship between healing practices from indigenous cultures across the Americas including Inuit, Navajo, and curanderismo traditions.

Virginia Grise’s recently published book Your Healing is Killing Me directly confronts the gap between modern and indigenous healing as well as between access. Grise is a recipient of the Yale Drama Award, Whiting Writers’ Award, and the Princess Grace Award in Theatre Directing.

Monday, November 27

12:00 pm Lecture
DEATH AND LITERATURE: TIME, SICKNESS, AND WRITING
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 501
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

This talk will offer an overview of professor Robert Tierney's research on
modern Japanese death literature. He defines "death literature" as a body
of works defined by an existential encounter with sickness and death,
rather than as a specific literary genre. He focuses on works by three
writers from the Meiji period: Nakae Chōmin (1847-1901) ,Masaoka Shiki
(1867-1902), and Natsume Sōseki (1867-1916). The philosopher
Chōmin wrote One Year and a Half (Ichinen yūhan), and Sequel to One
Year and A Half (Zokuichinen yūhan) in 1901 after a doctor discovered a
cancerous tumor in his throat and told him he had a year and a half left to
live. The poet Shiki, bedridden with spinal tuberculosis from 1896, wrote
daily chronicles of his life that appeared in the Nihon Newspaper in 1901
and 1902: A Drop of Ink (Bokujū itteki) and A Sickbed Six Feet Long
(Byōsho rokushaku). After a near-death experience in Shūzenji in 1911,
the novelist Soseki came "back to life" and wrote Reminiscences and
other matters (Omoidasu koto nado) in 31 installments in the Asahi
Newspaper. He will look at similarities and differences in the way these
writers approached sickness and time and found meaning through
writing.

The lecture is open for public. Refreshments will be served.

2:00 pm Film
Adilkhan Yerzhanov's film "The Owners"
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
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Introduction by and post-screening Q&A with the film producer Serik Abishev (Kazakhstan)

"Kafka meets Kaurismaki in this bleakly funny Kazakh drama.... The Owners is a caustic critique of small-town corruption and croneyism in contemporary Kazakhstan."
--Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

7:00 pm Presentation
More Than Just Mosaics: The Ancient Synagogue at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee
Location:
324 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with Jewish Studies Program
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Since 2011, Professor Jodi Magness has been directing excavations in the ancient village of Huqoq. The excavations have brought to light the remains of a monumental Late Roman synagogue building paved with stunning mosaics, including a variety of biblical scenes. In this slide-illustrated lecture, Professor Magness describes these exciting finds, including the discoveries made in last summer's season.

Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Israel Heritage Room, which opened in November 1987. Reception and informal tours to follow.

Tuesday, November 28

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS International Career Toolkit Series: Michelle Kirby & my Agro: Helping Farmers Find Financing
Location:
Posvar 4217
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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Are you interested in international development? Do you have a passion for impactful social enterprise? If so, don't miss the opportunity to hear from Michelle Kirby! Michelle has spent a decade working across the globe: from Mali to Madagascar, Brazil to Indonesia, DC to the DRC. She spent three years working for One Acre Fund in Rwanda, she consulted for the World Bank and Madagascar's Office of National Nutrition. She currently serves as the Senegal Country Director for myAgro, an innovative social enterprise that provides financing to small-hold farmers who lack access from traditional banks and Microfinance institutions. myAgro's innovative bank-less savings scheme has helped increase average harvests for myAgro farmers 50-100% over traditional farms, and net farming income increases $150-$300 per farmer.

4:00 pm Information Session
UCIS International Career Toolkit Site Visit: WholeRen
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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Pittsburgh is exploding as an education destination with students from across the globe! Join UCIS and the Asian Studies Center on this month's site visit to WholeRen to learn about their work on integrating and promoting Chinese-American educational opportunities and potential ways that you can get involved.

WholeRen, headquartered in Pittsburgh, was founded by Chinese and American professional educators in 2010 to create and promote cross cultural educational opportunities. WholeRen integrates a range of educational services geared towards assisting international students succeed in Pittsburgh including high school and college academic application consulting, college transfer services, skills training workshops, on-going academic counseling, immersion classrooms, and Chinese-American cultural exchanges, and executive education.

Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/bvt2C8FKIkD2wZk93 Space is limited to 10 students so sign up early! Preference is given to Junior and Senior students. You must finalize your registration with a refundable $10 cash deposit to Elaine Linn in the Global Studies Center (Posvar 4100).

Wednesday, November 29

12:30 pm Student Club Activity
Student Lunch
Location:
4209 Posvar
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
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From 12:00 to 1:30-ish on Wednesday, November 29th (in 4209 Posvar), students will have the opportunity to have lunch with Sierra Green, an archivist at the Heinz History Center. In an informal discussion over lunch Sierra will talk about her career path so far, trends she sees in the fields of archival and museum work, and suggestions she’d offer students who are interested in eventually pursuing grad programs and jobs in her field. A brief bio: A native of Adamsville, Pennsylvania, Sierra Green completed her Masters in Library and Information Science with a specialization in Archives, Preservation, and Records Management from the University of Pittsburgh in 2012. As an archivist at the Heinz History Center’s Detre Library & Archives, Sierra is engaged in archival processing and reference services in addition to her work in public and educational programming. Throughout her graduate and professional work thus far, Sierra has fostered a deep passion for and interest in archival outreach, engagement, and public awareness. She takes great pleasure in spreading the word about archival collections and the work of archivists within a museum environment.

2:00 pm Reception
Women's International Club Holiday Reception
Location:
University Club Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Women's International Club Holiday Reception.
$10 Admission per person.

Proceeds go to the Philippine Nationality Room Construction!

Tina Purpura demonstration on making sugar flowers, a Filipino artistic tradition!

Scholarship Awardees Kyle Wyche and Kelsea Lasorda present their experiences in Ecuador and South Africa, respectively.

Thursday, November 30

12:00 pm Lecture
Populist Discourse and Civic Culture
Location:
4217 Wesley Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
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How does the political discourse of populist leaders affect citizens’ orientations towards the democracy? Latin America offers some of the most representative cases of populism, as well as significant negative cases, where populism has not occurred. The main goal is to identify differences between the governing styles of two Latin American leaders in order to provide clues about links between populism and political culture of their citizens. I analyze the content of the political discourses of two presidents in Latin America: Rafael Correa and Jose Mujica. The former is considered a case of a populist regime, while the latter considered is a case of the non-occurrence of populism. Changes in citizens’ attitudes and orientations towards democracy could reveal the impact of populist frames that leaders develop in their political discourses.

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
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Derric I. Heck is a Graduate Research and Teaching Associate of the Center for Urban Education housed within the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a Diversity Scholar as well as a K. Leroy Irvis Fellow. His research includes a focus on how teachers rationalize and navigate topics of race within the classroom; how the learning environment acts as facilitator of cultural dialogue; and how U.S. teachers engage and utilize the indigenous wisdom and various cultures within Africa as a teaching and learning too. He will discuss his research using case study examples from Kenya and Ethiopia

6:00 pm Lecture
Angry Subjects: In/Civility, Christian Nationalism, and Paranoid Position in an Age of Trump
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 602
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, Department of Religious Studies, University Honors College, and the Year of Diversity at the University of Pittsburgh, and Humanities Center, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Programs in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies and Sexuality & Women’s Studies and Jewish Studies.
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Join the Department of Religious Studies for this free and public installment of their "Queering Religion" series presented by Ann Pellegrini, Professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis & Director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University. In addition to her groundbreaking Love the Sin with Janet Jakobsen (2003, 2004), Ann Pellegrini is author of Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race (1997); coauthor of “You Can Tell Just By Looking” and 20 Other Myths About LGBT Life and People with Michael Bronski and Michael Amico (2013); coeditor of Secularisms with Janet Jakobsen (2008) and Queer Theory and the Jewish Question with Daniel Boyarin and Daniel Itzkovitz (2003). Pellegrini coedits the Sexual Cultures Series (NYU Press) and is currently completing a book on “queer structures of religious feeling.” A reception will follow.

This event is cosponsored by the Provost’s Year of Diversity, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women’s Studies and Jewish Studies.

7:00 pm Film
The Divine Order
Location:
McConomy Auditorium
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Swiss-American Society of Pittsburgh, CMU Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion and CMU Gender Programs and LGBTQ+ Initiatives
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Winner of the Audience Award for Best Narrative Film at the Tribeca Film Festival, The Divine Order is set in Switzerland in 1971 where women are still denied the right to vote. When Nora (Marie Leuenberger, winner of a Best Actress award at Tribeca), an unfulfilled housewife, is forbidden by her husband from taking a part-time job, her growing interest in women's liberation turns her into the poster child for her town's suffragette movement. Refusing to back down in the face of opposition, she convinces the women in her village to go on strike. In today's world where many are still fighting to be heard, The Divine Order is an uplifting look at how much change a small group--or even one person--can enact if they stand up for what they believe in.