Events in UCIS

Wednesday, January 10

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Japanese Coming of Age Celebrations
Location:
Ballroom B, University Club
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Friday, January 12

4:00 pm Career Counselling
Presenting Yourself via LinkedIn
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Interested in careers in International Law? Security? International Development? Arts and Entertainment? International Business? Health?

This toolkit series introduces students to the multitude of careers available by meeting and interacting with professionals in a variety of fields. Many of our guest speakers are Pitt alumni and those that graduated with an International Studies Certificate. By attending one or all of the panels, students will gain insight on career choices, what specific careers entail, how to articulate and prepare for short and long term career goals, and utilize resources at Pitt to make their goals a reality.

This series is designed for students to learn from professionals about:

What their work entails;
How they prepared for their career and what led them to their current position;
If they had to do it over, how would they better prepare themselves given resources at the university;
What employers are looking for in new-hires including soft and hard skills;
How to network with really interesting people

Tuesday, January 16

12:30 pm Lecture
Lex Mercatoria and Soft Law in International Commercial Arbitration
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Marco Torsello is Professor of Comparative Law at the School of Law of the University of Verona, Italy. He is also a Global Professor of Law in NYU School of Law's La w Abroad program in Paris, and an Adjunct Professor at the School of management, MIP-Politecnico di Milano. His many publications include articles on international commercial arbitration, EUcommercial law, and the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). He is the co-author with Franco Ferrari of "International Sales Law-CISG in a Nutshell"

4:00 pm Lecture
Feminist Posthumanism and Life in the Abyss
Location:
501G Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Cultural Studies, Department of English, GSWS Program, The Humanities Center and the Literature Program
See Details

Join Distinguished Teaching Professor Stacy Alaimo from the University of Texas Arlington for her talk this January at Pitt. Prof. Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of the environmental humanities and gender studies. She has published three monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell UP, 2000);
Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana UP, 2010); and Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pressures in Posthuman Times (U of Minnesota P, 2016). Bodily Natures won the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) Award for Ecocriticism in 2011 and was featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy in 2013. Alaimo also coedited Material Feminisms (Indiana UP 2008), and her edited collection Matter is forthcoming in 2017 (Macmillan). She is known for developing the concept of "trans-corporeality," a concept widely in circulation and included as a key term in Rosi Braidotti's The Posthuman Glossary (2017). Her current book project is entitled "Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss."

Graduate students may also attend a lunchtime colloquium with Professor Alaimo from 11:00am- 1:00pm in 501G in the Cathedral. Contact Nancy Glazener (glazener@pitt.edu) to RSVP, get access to readings, and to convey dietary restrictions.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
A Roundtable Discussion on the Pitt World History Center’s World-Historical Gazetter Project
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of The World History Center and Department of History
See Details

Featuring:
Anne Knowles (University of Maine), Ruth Mostern (History), Karl Grossner (Stanford), and Ryan Horne (World History Center)

Presented by the World History Center

4:00 pm Reception
Italian Fulbright Welcome Reception
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education and University of Pittsburgh School of Law
See Details

Please join the European Studies Center and Center for International Legal Education in welcoming Francesca Ragno, this year’s Italian Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer, to the University of Pittsburgh for a welcoming reception in the Alcoa Room at 4:00 – 5:30 pm.

Francesca Ragno is Researcher (tenure position) and Adjunct Professor of International Law at the School of Law of Verona University. She graduated in Law (J.D.) with honors at the University of Bologna, and obtained her PhD degree from the University of Verona. Throughout her career she spent several research stays abroad, including at the University of Hamburg, University of Heidelberg, and NYU. Her teaching and scholarship span Private International Law, European Law, International Commercial Law, and International Arbitration.

In her capacity as our 2018 Italian Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer, Professor Ragno has left her home University (Verona) to spend a four-month period at the University of Pittsburgh for spring 2018, where she is teaching “EU from an International Law Perspective.” The overarching aim of her teaching project is to increase understanding in the US of EU law at a critical time for the very existence of the European Union and its role as a global actor. At the same time, she cherishes the opportunity to reflect with students on the raison d'être of the EU from an American perspective and on the benefits and the opportunities that the EU provides for the USA.

The University of Pittsburgh is proud to host one of only five Italian Fulbright Distinguished Chairs in the U.S., in partnership with the U.S. – Italy Fulbright Commission in Italy. The University of Pittsburgh Italian Fulbright Chair is administered by the European Studies Center in cooperation with the Departments of French & Italian, History, and History of Art and Architecture.

6:30 pm Film
Neruda (Chile)
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

NERUDA: Una Cacería Salvaje (Pablo Larraín, Chile, 2016)
*Subtitles provided in English
With commentary by Pedro Salas, Ph.D. Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Instructor, Slippery Rock University

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

From A. O. Scott’s New York Times’ Review: “’Neruda,’ Pablo Larraín’s semifantastical biopic, is a warmhearted film about a hot-blooded man that is nonetheless troubled by a subtle, perceptible chill. Blending fact with invention, it tells the story of a confrontation between an artist (the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda) and an emerging dictatorship, and more generally illuminates the endless struggle between political authority and the creative imagination. For anyone who believes that poetry and democracy spring from the same source and provoke the same enemies, this movie provides both encouragement and warning.”

Official Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neUwXV_cSwM

Wednesday, January 17

4:00 pm Career Counselling
Presenting Yourself, 30 Second Elevator Speech
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Interested in careers in International Law? Security? International Development? Arts and Entertainment? International Business? Health?

This toolkit series introduces students to the multitude of careers available by meeting and interacting with professionals in a variety of fields. Many of our guest speakers are Pitt alumni and those that graduated with an International Studies Certificate. By attending one or all of the panels, students will gain insight on career choices, what specific careers entail, how to articulate and prepare for short and long term career goals, and utilize resources at Pitt to make their goals a reality.

This series is designed for students to learn from professionals about:

What their work entails;
How they prepared for their career and what led them to their current position;
If they had to do it over, how would they better prepare themselves given resources at the university;
What employers are looking for in new-hires including soft and hard skills;
How to network with really interesting people

Thursday, January 18

2:00 pm Lecture
Consistently Invisible? Women's News Media Coverage during the European Elections, 1999-2014"
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Funded by the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

5:00 pm Lecture
Telling Spatial Stories of the Holocaust
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of History
See Details

Historical Geographer Anne Knowles is co-founder of the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative http://holocaustgeographies.geo.txstate.edu/and a specialist in Historical GIS, Geovisualization, and Digital Humanities, with topical interest in intersections of economy, technology, and culture and their expression in the landscape. She will be Visiting Short-Term Fellow at Pitt's Humanities Center: see Humanities Center calendar for further events and workshops during her visit.

Presented by the Pittsburgh History Department Colloquium Series

5:00 pm Information Session
Global Studies Student Meeting
Location:
121 David Lawrence Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

A required informational meeting for all undergraduate students enrolled in GSC. Information presented will include opportunities about funding, study abroad, travel, pop-up courses, careers and important dates, and more! You'll meet the GSC staff as well as other students in the program. Snacks served along with special prizes!

Friday, January 19

12:00 pm Lecture
Support for Democracy in Decline: The LAPOP Americas Barometer 2016/17
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for International Studies (UCIS)
See Details

Mitchell A. Seligson is the Centennial Professor of Political Science, Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor, and Professor of Sociology (by courtesy) at Vanderbilt University and Founder and Senior Advisor of Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP), which conducts the AmericasBarometer surveys that currently covers over 30 countries in the Americas. Seligson has carried out hundreds of surveys of public opinion, mainly focused on democracy and governance, in many countries in Latin America, but has also included projects in Africa and the Balkans. For details, see www.LapopSurveys.org.He currently is an elected member of the General Assembly of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights. Over the past decade, he has been awarded over $25nmillion in research grants and contracts. To read more about Dr. Mitchell Seligson visit:
https://www.vanderbilt.edu/political-science/bio/mitchell-seligson

Lunch will be provided.

for more information contact: ket82@pitt.edu

2:00 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series
Location:
3800 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Africana Studies Department; GSPIA; World History Center
See Details

What can practices to commemorate official epidemic responses tell us about the logics of response itself? Specifically, what do they tell us about the visions and logics of care that such practices represent? In this paper, I compare two exhibits that describe efforts to respond to the 2014-6 West African Ebola epidemic: the Imperial War Museum’s “Fighting Extremes: From Ebola to ISIS” (London) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Ebola: People + Public Health + Political Will” (Atlanta). Even as they rely on remarkably similar objects – rubber boots, protective gear, tippy taps, short, looped video interviews with frontline workers – to tell their Ebola stories, they differ with respect to how objects are oriented in space, in relation to other objects, ideas, and experiences, and their strategic positioning within museum (and institutional) agendas, more generally. These differences form the basis of my analysis, which is still quite preliminary. For the military museum, Ebola represents an instance of the ‘extreme’ and the extraordinary capacity of the armed forces to provide care under challenging circumstances. The exhibit showcases the tensions of militarized humanitarianism (referred to elsewhere as the ‘empire of hugs’): the military’s need to sustain itself through expansion of its work to humanitarian interventions and the counterinsurgency battles that are increasingly employing private military contractors. The CDC exhibit, while highlighting the contribution of its workers and ‘partnerships’ so central in US public health discourse plays to intimate dimensions of ‘population’ – suggesting that acts of care may occur outside the frame of the interpersonal. I end by discussing a recent trip to the in-progress National Ebola Museum in Njala, Sierra Leone, where questions of local ownership, memory and immunity linger in the archives.

3:00 pm Lecture
State Fictions and the Friction of Frontier Terrain: Songpan and the Huanglong Pilgrimage since Ming Times
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

What can the long history of a Sino-Tibetan region tell us about China’s frontiers? This talk develops themes of comparative interest from Contesting the Yellow Dragon: Ethnicity, Religion and the State by Xiaofei Kang and Donald S. Sutton, Brill (CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2016). Officialdom from Ming times to the PRC reform period worked to overcome the ‘friction of terrain’ (in James C. Scott’s expression) in remote Songpan, handicapped by limited resources and their own ideological assumptions. But the same handicaps, and the peculiar unfolding of local history, helped locals to find space for their own political and cultural expressions, producing a frontier identity not quite like any other.

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Monday, January 22

12:00 pm Lecture
Regionalism Resurgent: Political Machines and Labor Migration in Russia
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

The centralization of political and economic power in Russia has been a theme of Vladimir Putin's reign, gaining control over regional governments through the Kremlin's party of power, United Russia. Against this trend of curtailing contests of federalism, migration policy has emerged as a policy arena in which we observe regions claiming authority against the federal government. Through a qualitative investigation of four regions, this research argues that migration policy will remain a conduit for regions to secure political power for the foreseeable future, as Russia maintains its position as host to the world's third-largest immigrant population.

5:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Occupation, Deportation, Genocide - Agents of Memory in Post-Soviet Latvia
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall- History Department Lounge
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of
See Details

Chapter presented by Katja Wezel (DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh) with comments by Jonathan Harris (University of Pittsburgh) and Emanuala Grama (CMU).

Tuesday, January 23

12:30 pm Information Session
Fictional Narrations of Islamic Pasts
Location:
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning 602
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Islamicate Studies Working Group at the University of Pittsburgh
See Details

Lunch Provided

The Islamicate Studies Working Group consists of faculty and staff at the University of Pittsburgh who are exploring the prospects of building an academic program for the study of the Muslim World. Its members come from the Dietrich School’s departments of English; History; Linguistics; Religious Studies; and Sociology; as well as from the Law School; the School of Education; and staff members from the Library and Global Studies, and it incorporates visiting postdoctoral fellows faculty members.

Wednesday, January 24

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - Wind, Water, Sun: Clean Energy in Europe
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies Series
Location:
4801 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and Global Studies Center along with History of Art and Architecture Department as part of Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Carnegie Museum of Art.
See Details

Visiting scholar Koyo Kouoh will offer a brief presentation and lead a discussion on RAW Acádemie, an experimental program for artistic thought and curatorial inquiry that she recently launched as part of the activities of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge, and society in Dakar, Senegal.

Suggested reading: Koyo Kouoh, “Being Africa: Contextual Narratives of Artistic Environments,” in Paul O'Neill, et al, eds., The Curatorial Conundrum: What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice? (LUMA Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, distributed by MIT Press, 2016), 181–188.
Link to PDF: https://pitt.box.com/s/inue7nluqaejo7d9d8boc8uguyl925f9

Biography: Koyo Kouoh is the founding artistic director of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge and society in Dakar, Senegal (www.rawmc.org). For Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, Kouoh is participating with Dig Where You Stand, an exhibition within the exhibition based on the Carnegie Museum of Art’s collection. Previously, she was the curator of 1:54 FORUM, the educational programme at the Contemporary African Art Fair in London and New York, and served in the curatorial teams for documenta 12 (2007) and documenta 13 (2012). Kouoh was also the curator of “Still (the) Barbarians,” 37th EVA International, Ireland’s Biennial in Limerick (2016); “Streamlines: Oceans, Global Trade and Migration,” Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2015); “Body Talk: Feminism, Sexuality and the Body in the work of six African women artists,” WIELS, Lunds Konsthall, 49N6E FRAC Lorraine (2015–2016); and “Precarious Imaging: Visibility surrounding African Queerness,” RAW Material Company (2014). She edited Word!Word?Word! Issa Samb and the undecipherable form, RAW Material Company/OCA/Sternberg Press (2013), the first monograph dedicated to the work of seminal Senegalese artist Issa Samb; Condition Report on Building Art Institutions in Africa, a collection of essays resulting from the eponymous symposium held in Dakar in January 2012; and Chronicle of a Revolt: Photographs of a Season of Protest, RAW Material Company & Haus der Kulturen der Welt (2012). Besides a sustained theoretical, exhibition, and residency program at RAW Material Company, she maintains a critical curatorial, advisory and judging activity internationally. She lives and works in Dakar and Basel.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Koyo Kouoh Brown Bag Workshop
Location:
4180 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture, Carnegie Museums and Hewlitt Foundation
See Details

KOYO KOUOH is an internationally renowned, Dakar-based curator and educator who will spend two weeks as a scholar-in-residence at Pitt later this month and is deeply involved in the Carnegie International. Kouoh is the founding artistic director of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge and society in Dakar, Senegal. As an independent curator, she has contributed to several major international exhibitions, including documenta 12 (2007) and 13 (2012); most recently, she curated the 2016 EVA International exhibition (Ireland's biennial). As part of her plans for the 57th Carnegie International exhibition (Oct. 2018-Mar. 2019), curator Ingrid Schaffner has invited Kouoh to create an exhibition-within-an-exhibition, entitled Dig Where You Stand, which will be drawn from from Carnegie Museum of Art's permanent collection of African and other "non-western" artworks and artifacts.

4:00 pm Student Club Activity
The Saudi Arabia - Qatar Diplomatic Crisis
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Global Affairs Club
See Details

Come join the Global Affairs Club in hosting Prof. Jared McCormick, Visiting Assistant Professor of Contemporary International Issues, for a discussion of the Saudi Arabia-Qatar Diplomatic Crisis of 2017. Following a brief presentation by Prof. McCormick, we will open our discussion to the broader context of the Saudi Arabia - Iran regional power dynamic. This will be the Global Affairs Club's first meeting of the semester. Anyone interested in joining the club can speak with an officer at this meeting.

Thursday, January 25

12:30 pm Lecture
Muslim Internationalism and Pan-Islamic Ideas During the Cold War
Location:
Sociology Colloquium Room, Posvar Hall 2431
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Islamicate Studies Working Group at the University of Pittsburgh
See Details

The Colloquium discusses the origins of contemporary Islamist narratives of world order in the global Cold War context of the 1970s and 1980s. Prof. Aydin argues that the political movement of Islamism emerged as a transnational ideological movement only in the last two decades of the cold war. Both anti-Western Islamism and Islamophobic discourses in the West carry the characteristics of the Cold War ideological battles. Islamism carries the formative influence of universalist claims and double standards of cold war ideological rivalries. Modern Pan-Islamic narratives, he argues, are modern constructs that emerged in the intertwined crisis of the cold war and decolonization processes. This attention to Cold War can also help us better understand how an imagined Muslim world began to be depicted as the new enemy of the West in Islamophobic ideologies after the Cold war.

Lunch provided
*Attendees are encouraged to read the colloquium materials ahead of the event. They may be requested by writing to Prof. Mohammed Bamyeh at mab205@pitt.edu.

The Islamicate Studies Working Group consists of faculty and staff at the University of Pittsburgh who are exploring the prospects of building an academic program for the study of the Muslim World. Its members come from the Dietrich School’s departments of English; History; Linguistics; Religious Studies; and Sociology; as well as from the Law School; the School of Education; and staff members from the Library and Global Studies, and it incorporates visiting postdoctoral fellows faculty members.

3:00 pm Information Session
Uganda Field Seminar & Internship- summer 2018
Location:
rm. 3800 posvar hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

In Summer 2018, you can join this field-based seminar and internship opportunity counting towards your African Studies Program certificate and graduation! Applications are being accepted. Come to the info session on 1/25 at 3PM (grads and undergrads from any school/department). If you are interested in attending, email Kelsey at kew132@pitt.edu.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
EUSA Roundtable: “Will the EU Fall Apart?”
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and European Union Studies Association
See Details

Speakers will include: Abe Newman, Frederic Merand, Matthias Matthijs, and Rachel Epstein

Free and open to the Public
-Advanced registration is requested via https://eusa_roundtable.eventbrite.com

Co-sponsored by the European Union Studies Association, European Horizons – Pitt Chapter, and the German American Chamber of Commerce

4:00 pm Information Session
Topic: Temporary Protected Status: Origins, Policy, and Implications of Termination 
Location:
CLAS Reception Area!
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas at CLAS/UCIS
See Details

Pizza will be provided.https://www.google.com/search?q=immigration&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ve...
http://www.panoramas.pitt.edu/
Sponsored by Panoramas and the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) 

4:30 pm Lecture
Biopolitics, Mobility, and the Politics of Migrant Dispersal
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
See Details

Dr. Tazzioli is a Lecturer in the Geography Department at Swansea University and Visiting Lecturer in Forced Migration at City University of London. She is the author of Spaces of Governmentality: Autonomous Migration and the Arab Uprisings (2014), co-author with Glenda Garelli of Tunisia as a Revolutionized Space of Migration (2016), and co-editor of Foucault and the History of Our Present (2015). She is co-founder of the journal Materialifoucaultian. Her talk will focus on the Political aspects of Migrant Dispersal and the way biopolotics and mobility factor into migration today.

6:00 pm Lecture
Institution Building as Curatorial Practice
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and Global Studies Center along with History of Art and Architecture Department as part of Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Carnegie Museum of Art.
See Details

For many countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, cultural production was historically co-opted by the state in anti-colonial struggles and post-colonial nation building, paving the way for decades of tension between private initiatives and government mechanisms. The situation has changed but hardly for the better, with many states neglecting the financial and infrastructural needs of their country’s cultural landscapes. Yet within this void, the last twenty years have born witness to the flourishing of independent, non-commercial art centers across these zones. In developing an expanded curatorial practice that embraces the institution as form, in contexts where aesthetics and knowledge production often escape Western paradigms, such spaces allow for new understandings of the potential of arts organizations as well as the relationship between art and life.

Friday, January 26

8:30 am Conference
Best Practices Showcasing Globalization Across the Curriculum
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia
See Details

This conference will bring together Pennsylvania faculty with peers affiliated with the Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia for a workshop on innovative ways to internationalize curricula at community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

To attend, please register by January 19, 2018 via https://tinyurl.com/yaf5hjod.

1:00 pm Lecture
ADP/LSAP Colloquium 1/26/18, 1pm- International Education
Location:
Posvar Colloquium Room (5604)
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with School of Education
See Details

You are invited to our first ADP/LSAP colloquium for Spring 2018.
Our focus will be on International Education. We will be hearing from graduate students in the School of Education who participated in an immersive, Fulbright-funded trip to Ethiopia last summer that was co-sponsored by Pitt’s African Studies program and the Wolaita Sodo University.
Friday January 26th
12noon – 1pm
Posvar Colloquium Room (5604)
All faculty and students are welcome!
Light refreshments will be provided.

3:00 pm Lecture
Food fights at the WTO: political economy of India's focus on food security in international trade negotiations
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

India is both a major agricultural producer and exporter. Therefore, its steadfast focus on food security and defensive position at the agricultural negotiations surprises observers. In my work I analyze the socio-economic constraints and the political processes that have shaped this focus on food security since the beginning of the Doha Round of negotiations in 2001. Even though Indian agriculture has gone through notable changes since then, India faces substantial challenges in its attempt at structural transformation from an agrarian to a non-agrarian state. These domestic challenges shape India's position on agriculture at the multilateral trade negotiations.

This event is open for public and some Indian refreshments will be served.

6:00 pm Festival
ASO 6th Annual African King & Queen Pageant
Location:
O'Hara Ballroom
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of African Student Organization (ASO)
See Details

The African students organization (ASO) is a student led organization on campus that is dedicated to spreading awareness about the different cultures within Africa and teaching the student body about the political and social issues that effect the continent and its diaspora. The organization does this by engaging students in biweekly general body meetings, monthly large scale events and other student gatherings. ASO also aims to engage students in community service around Pittsburgh through volunteering activities and is dedicated to giving back to the continent through Charity. Currently, ASO is partnered up with Duduzile Academy in Kenya in an effort to highlight the importance of education. Lastly, ASO wishes to create a strong community where students of African descent and any other students who are interested in learning more about African culture may come together.
We meet every other Tuesday starting January 16th in the William Pitt Union room 548 at 8:30 pm. All students interested are welcome to join ASO.

ASO will be hosting the 6th Annual African King and Queen Pageant to showcase the rich cultures, beauty and history of various African nations. The contestants will discuss different aspects ranging from traditional African society to the modern age. They will discuss the systems of politics, social and economic for the respective countries that will be represented at the pageant. This year contestant will be representing Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya.

Food will be provided. Proceeds from the event will go to charity to support a school in Kenya

Saturday, January 27

2:00 pm Reception
Mithai Indian Sweets Tasting
Location:
Cloister, Frick Fine Arts Building
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

We will offer many different types of Indian sweets to taste and learn about sweets making and the significance of sweets in South Asia.

Wednesday, January 31

7:30 pm Film
13 Days
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS and the course of US-Latin American Relations will sponsor a showing of 13 Days, with Kevin Costner, a film that retells the story of the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.

After the film we will have a short question and answer session, highlighting the drama of the time but also including a fact-check of the film.
4130 Posvar Hall
7:30 p.m.
For more information, contact: Scott Morgenstern at smorgens@pitt.edu

Refreshments will be provided.