Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 8 until Friday, February 9

(All day) Career Counselling
Washington D.C. Trip 1
Location:
Various, Washington D.C.
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
See Details

Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different careers and gain an insider's perspective on the different organizations. Students will participate in one of the four tracks:
* Global Health and Development
* Diplomacy and Security
* International Development and Education
* Human Rights and Refugees

Along with meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, government agencies there will be a reception to meet center alumni. A total of 44 students will be selected to go (from 4 participating UCIS centers.)

Friday, February 9

10:00 am Presentation
Novetta-Advanced Analytics Career Talk
Location:
4209 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Graduate student career talk with Elise Thorsen about her work at Novetta-Advanced Analytics

12:00 pm Lecture
A Conversation with Samir Lakhani
Location:
Alumni Hall, 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, David Berg Center for Ethics and Leadership, innovation Institute and and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

Samir was a college student volunteering in a rural Cambodian village when he witnessed firsthand the spread of disease due to poor personal hygiene. Today, Samir’s non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, recycles bars of soap from hotels in Cambodia and distributes them to those in need.

2:30 pm Lecture
Using Algorithms to Read Pushkin's Poetry
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Quantitative metrics, and particularly the statistical study of meter and rhyme, has been a core research methodology in Russian verse theory and scholarship at least since the early twentieth century both among Russian scholars (e.g., Belyj, Taranovski, Gasparov) and abroad (e.g., Shaw, Scherr, Friedberg). Until recently, the methods have had to rely largely on the laborious and unscalable human identification and tagging or recording of all individual stress and rhyme phenomena, which have then served as input into the (often computer-assisted) statistical analysis of synchronic patterns and diachronic trends in meter and rhyme. Almost the entire corpus of Russian classical verse is now freely accessible on the Internet in authoritative scholarly digital editions, and computational tools could therefore be used to relieve scholars of the human labor previously needed to prepare and collect the data needed for studies in quantitative versification. To the extent that the data preparation and analysis proceeds algorithmically, intermediate results can be saved and examined and the entire process can be replicated and verified. Under discussion in this presentation are the computational aids that the "Meter, Rhythm, and Rhyme" project team has been developing to build poetic corpora, with particular attention to Alexander Pushkin’s verse.

3:00 pm Lecture
Sound of Japanese Street Demonstrations from the Antinuclear Movement to Pro-Democracy Protests
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

The Fukushima nuclear accident has launched a series of ongoing social movements in Japan—the antinuclear movement; the anti-racist movement; and the protests against such policies as the Secrecy Law, the Security Bill, and the Conspiracy Law. This talk examines the ways in which musicians' and activists' responses have shifted with political developments in recent social movements. Beginning with an overview of the circumstances surrounding the nuclear crisis and the four spaces in which musicians engage in politics, the talk will then focus on street demonstrations, and in particular, the roles played by drum corps, chants, and sound trucks, the conflicting philosophies behind them, and the shifts that have occurred as the framing and the participants of the protests has changed.

3:00 pm Lecture
Healthy Global Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship
Location:
William Pitt Union 630
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Director's Office, Global Studies Center and Study Abroad Office along with Center for Cross Cultural Leadership and Development
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Interested in a career with a non-profit—or in developing a new NGO that will change lives? You’re sure to gain insight and inspiration from Samir.

5:30 pm Lecture
Fireside Chat
Location:
University Club, Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, innovation Institute and World Affairs Council
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Samir joins Audrey Murrell, associate dean of Pitt’s College of Business Administration, for a conversation about ethics, leadership and global entrepreneurship in the 21st century.