Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 15

4:00 pm Lecture
Global 1968 Film and Discussion: The Nigerian Civil War and Its Impact on Nation-Building in Africa
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

The UCIS Gloabl 68 Series draws themes from events that took place around the world in 1968. As part of this series, the African Studies Program will be showing a documentary entitled "Biafra and Nigeria War 1967-1970". This will be followed by a panel discussion on the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War (July 6, 1967 - January 3, 1970). Our panel will discuss the causes, aftermath and legacy of the conflict and the lessons for independence, democracy and freedom. Our invited panel consists of Edmond Keller from UCLA, Joshua Forest from La Roche University and Moses Ochonu from Vanderbilt.

4:30 pm Lecture
Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
See Details

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

4:30 pm Lecture
Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Susan Bibler Coutin holds a Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology and is professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society and the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, where she served as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the Graduate Division from 2010-2017. Her research has examined social, political, and legal activism surrounding immigration issues, particularly immigration from El Salvador to the United States.Her newest book, Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence (Duke University Press, 2016) examines the experiences of 1.5 generation migrants, that is, individuals who were born in El Salvador but raised in the United States. Based on interviews with 1.5 generation Salvadorans in Southern California and in El Salvador, this book explores the power and limitations of nation-based categories of membership.

8:00 pm Film
Salam Neighbor
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor
See Details

In an effort to better understand refugee life, [the filmmakers] spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, [they] were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. [Their] experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.