Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 22 until Saturday, February 24

8:00 am Symposium
Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Thursday, February 22

12:00 pm Lecture
Justice and the Global City
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Cities in Transformation Initiative
See Details

Dr. Hoover is a lecturer in Political Theory in the School of Politics and International Politics at Queen Mary University of London. He has worked previously at City University London, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also received his PhD. For the past several years he has focused on the use of human rights by diverse political movements in order to take the measure of both their limitations and their promise for a more radically democratic world. His latest research project rethinks questions of global justice by focusing on the injustices experienced in contemporary urban life to develop an argument in favor of more inclusive and democratic cities. Dr. Hoover's work on the human right to housing and the right to the city have led to collaborations with housing rights groups in the USA and the UK, including the FOCUS E15 campaign in East London. He is also the co-convener and chair of the BISA Ethics and World Politics Working Group.

4:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Gendered Language: Tradition or Barrier to Equality?
Location:
4200 Posvar Hall- CLAS Reception Area
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Round Table Discussion
Gendered Language: Tradition or Barrier to Equality?

Thursday, February 22nd at 4:00 pm
Center for Latin American Studies
4200 Posvar Hall (inside the UCIS office)

The CLAS Round Table Discussions are monthly Panoramas-sponsored events meant to facilitate meaningful dialogues on current issues in Latin America.

Pizza will be provided!

4:00 pm Lecture
Rebellious Youth and the Global 1960s: Politics, Punk Rock, and Propaganda in Cold War Japan
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center
4:30 pm Lecture
Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

6:00 pm Lecture
A Discussion on the Iran Nuclear Deal with Former Ambassador Dennis Jett
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Pitt Global Affairs Club
See Details

Professor Dennis Jett is a distinguished diplomat and academic, having served as U.S. ambassador to Peru and Mozambique under the Clinton administration. His experience and expertise focus on international relations, foreign administration, and American foreign policy.

Snacks Provided.

7:00 pm Performance
Black History Month Performance
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!