Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 1

12:30 pm Lecture
Studying Working-Class Culture & the History of Social Movements—Challenges & Possibilities
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture
5:00 pm Lecture
“Conversion Stories: Turning Communists into Nazis”
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Historians have long argued about the relationship between the workers and the Nazis. Did the Nazis betray the German working class or did they offer solutions to their problems? Answering these questions as part of a larger debate about politics and emotions means to pay close attention to the grievances and resentments that made possible the shift from class to race as the main category of identification. This lecture uses a little-known genre from the early 1930s known as Bewegungsromane (novels about the Nazi movement) to reconstruct the social(ist) imaginaries mobilized in the name of National Socialism. Today these Nazi conversion stories not only shed light on the politics of emotion that turned Communists into Nazis; they also model the symbolic convergence of nationalism, socialism, and populism in modern mass movements.

Friday, February 2

3:00 pm Lecture
The Performative State: Public Opinion, Political Pageantry, and Environmental Governance in China.
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

6:00 pm Lecture
Keynote Address: A Woman for the 21st Century
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will discuss the Medea Project and the process of creating productive dialogue to examine such conditions as racism, sexism, homophobia, addictions, and fear that greatly affect our daily lives. In addition, she will play video excerpts from her work and perform excerpts from her various writings and scripts.

Monday, February 5

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

4:00 pm Reception
Graduate Student Happy Hour
Location:
University Club Library
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Graduate students are invited to join Director, Michael Goodhart, and other GSC members to share their experiences, suggestions, and ideas over drinks and hors d'oeuvres as we revisit our graduate certificate.

Tuesday, February 6

4:30 pm Lecture
Planning Postindustrialism in Pittsburgh and Beyond
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Tracy Neumann specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century North American history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. She teaches courses on twentieth-century U.S. history, urban history, research methods, and public history. Before pursuing a PhD, she worked for several years as a consultant for a cultural resource management firm, and her professional experience as a public history practitioner led her to help develop Wayne State's MA Program in Public History, for which she serves as the coordinator. She also co-edits the Global Urban History blog and sits on the editorial boards of Urban History and Temple University Press's Pennsylvania History book series.

More information about the event TBA.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session, we will be reading Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones and hear from Pitt Prof. Felix Germain (Africana Studies).

6:30 pm Film
Rojo Amanecer (Mexico)
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Rojo Amanecer (Jorge Fons, Mexico, 1990)
*In Spanish and No English Subtitles!

The ONLY film to be shown at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie
Free and open to the public!
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

Rojo Amenecer is a film about the Tlatelolco Massacre in the section of Tlatelolco in Mexico City in the evening of October 2, 1968. It focuses on the day of a middle-class Mexican family living in one of the apartment buildings surrounding the Plaza de Tlatelolco (also known as the Plaza de las Tres Culturas)[1] and is based on testimonials from witnesses and victims.

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, February 7

12:00 pm Workshop
Professional Development Webinars - The German-speaking Academia: A Road Map to Navigating Research Institutions Beyond Universities
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research in East-Central Europe
See Details

Our center is excited to announce the launch of professional development webinars offered by the Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe. Are you a scholar or academic professional curious about European higher education and research? Discover opportunities to enhance your career mobility and research. This series is co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center.

Germany provides a highly developed network of university and non-university expertise for Eastern Europe and the post-Soviet states. The first webinar presented by the Herder Institute will provide a survey of all existing centers and institutions, and give an overview about their regional focus, research hubs, collections and infrastructures. For the purpose of drawing a more general picture, the discussion will include centers located in Austria and Switzerland in addition to those in Germany. Participants will gain insight into the present state and future development of East European Studies in these three countries and will learn how to organize a research trip and find the best opportunity for individual topics.

To register, visit http://aseees.org/programs/webinars.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Next webinar

March 7, 12 p.m. (EST)
Introducing the Herder Institute: Collections, Funding Opportunities, and Higher Education Partnerships

Thursday, February 8 until Friday, February 9

(All day) Career Counselling
Washington D.C. Trip 1
Location:
Various, Washington D.C.
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
See Details

Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different careers and gain an insider's perspective on the different organizations. Students will participate in one of the four tracks:
* Global Health and Development
* Diplomacy and Security
* International Development and Education
* Human Rights and Refugees

Along with meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, government agencies there will be a reception to meet center alumni. A total of 44 students will be selected to go (from 4 participating UCIS centers.)

Thursday, February 8

4:00 pm Lecture
1968: The Ambiguous Consequences of a Failed Revolution
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

The multiple uprisings of 1968 challenged authorities worldwide, and led to many reforms, but the insurgents misunderstood the nature of their insurgencies, and this misunderstanding drastically limited their effects. They did not add up to a revolution. Rather, in their multiplicity, they were something far more complicated and ambiguous: the culmination of an era of incremental progressive change, a signal of the collapse of conventional liberalism, and a prologue to deep cultural changes as well as grim backlash

Friday, February 9

10:00 am Presentation
Novetta-Advanced Analytics Career Talk
Location:
4209 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Graduate student career talk with Elise Thorsen about her work at Novetta-Advanced Analytics

12:00 pm Lecture
A Conversation with Samir Lakhani
Location:
Alumni Hall, 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, David Berg Center for Ethics and Leadership, innovation Institute and and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

Samir was a college student volunteering in a rural Cambodian village when he witnessed firsthand the spread of disease due to poor personal hygiene. Today, Samir’s non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, recycles bars of soap from hotels in Cambodia and distributes them to those in need.

2:30 pm Lecture
Using Algorithms to Read Pushkin's Poetry
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Quantitative metrics, and particularly the statistical study of meter and rhyme, has been a core research methodology in Russian verse theory and scholarship at least since the early twentieth century both among Russian scholars (e.g., Belyj, Taranovski, Gasparov) and abroad (e.g., Shaw, Scherr, Friedberg). Until recently, the methods have had to rely largely on the laborious and unscalable human identification and tagging or recording of all individual stress and rhyme phenomena, which have then served as input into the (often computer-assisted) statistical analysis of synchronic patterns and diachronic trends in meter and rhyme. Almost the entire corpus of Russian classical verse is now freely accessible on the Internet in authoritative scholarly digital editions, and computational tools could therefore be used to relieve scholars of the human labor previously needed to prepare and collect the data needed for studies in quantitative versification. To the extent that the data preparation and analysis proceeds algorithmically, intermediate results can be saved and examined and the entire process can be replicated and verified. Under discussion in this presentation are the computational aids that the "Meter, Rhythm, and Rhyme" project team has been developing to build poetic corpora, with particular attention to Alexander Pushkin’s verse.

3:00 pm Lecture
Sound of Japanese Street Demonstrations from the Antinuclear Movement to Pro-Democracy Protests
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

The Fukushima nuclear accident has launched a series of ongoing social movements in Japan—the antinuclear movement; the anti-racist movement; and the protests against such policies as the Secrecy Law, the Security Bill, and the Conspiracy Law. This talk examines the ways in which musicians' and activists' responses have shifted with political developments in recent social movements. Beginning with an overview of the circumstances surrounding the nuclear crisis and the four spaces in which musicians engage in politics, the talk will then focus on street demonstrations, and in particular, the roles played by drum corps, chants, and sound trucks, the conflicting philosophies behind them, and the shifts that have occurred as the framing and the participants of the protests has changed.

3:00 pm Lecture
Healthy Global Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship
Location:
William Pitt Union 630
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Director's Office, Global Studies Center and Study Abroad Office along with Center for Cross Cultural Leadership and Development
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Interested in a career with a non-profit—or in developing a new NGO that will change lives? You’re sure to gain insight and inspiration from Samir.

5:30 pm Lecture
Fireside Chat
Location:
University Club, Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, innovation Institute and World Affairs Council
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Samir joins Audrey Murrell, associate dean of Pitt’s College of Business Administration, for a conversation about ethics, leadership and global entrepreneurship in the 21st century.

Monday, February 12

4:30 pm Workshop
Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall- History Department Lounge
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of
See Details

Junior Faculty Manuscript Workshop on James Pickett's manuscript: Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis. Comments by Professor Devin DeWeese from the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Tuesday, February 13

12:00 pm Workshop
Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Arts
See Details

Artist-in-residence Rhodessa Jones will offer a brief presentation and lead a discussion on using performance-based pedagogies to teach Global Studies. Jones is an actress, teacher, director, and writer, perhaps best known for the Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women and HIV Circle, which is a performance workshop designed to achieve personal and social transformation with incarcerated women and women living with HIV.

4:30 pm Lecture
Archive & Event: Mexico, 1968
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS)
See Details

Global Legacies of 1968 Lecture:
“Archive and Event: Mexico, 1968”
by Samuel Steinburg, USC
4:00 p.m.--5:30 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall

Samuel Steinberg is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature at University of Southern California. Steinberg’s research and teaching engage modern and contemporary Latin American literature and visual culture, as well as critical theory and political thought. He is the author of Photopoetics at Tlatelolco: Afterimages of Mexico, 1968 (University of Texas Press, 2016). Currently he is finishing a book on literature and debt, “Ghostscripts: Inheritance of Juan Rulfo,” and beginning another, “The Speculative Image,” on political conceptuality and visual form.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the ‘year that changed the world.’ UCIS is commemorating this with our Global Legacies of 1968 series.
www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events

4:30 pm Workshop
Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Wednesday, February 14

6:30 pm Film
327 Cuadernos (Argentina)
Location:
Graduate Public Health Auditorium G-23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Documentary Film Screening and Discussion with the Director:
February 14, 2018
327 Cuadernos (Andrés Di Tella, 2015 Argentina)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie
Free and open to the public!

Ricardo Piglia, one of the great narrators of Hispanic language, returns to Argentina after many years of living abroad. It is proposed to review exhaustively, for the first time, the 327 notebooks that constitute his private diary.
327 Cuadernos Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR2EAbhaCs

For more information, please visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Thursday, February 15

12:30 pm Colloquium/Panel Discussion
Pernille Røge The Place of the Baltic in the Early Modern French Colonial Empire
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History and Humanities Center
See Details

This session explores ways in which the Baltic region enabled the rise and consolidation of the French
colonial empire in the Americas. As a supplier of naval stores, the Baltic has long been viewed as central to
early modern European expansion overseas. Nevertheless, its particular association with French empire
building remains little studied. Drawing on data from the Danish Sound Toll Registers and French consular
records form Copenhagen, Elsinore, Stockholm, and St. Petersburg, the paper delineates how French
colonization began as an attempt to secure commercial independence from the Baltic, only to produce the
opposite effect of binding the French colonial enterprise and the Baltic ever closer together.

Comments will be offered by Niklas Frykman and Allyson Delnore.

2:00 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
See Details

Ebola Does Not Fall from the Sky: Global Structural Violence and International Responses- presents challenges the conventional understanding that international crises are limited to instances of direct physical violence. Instead, it argues that the disproportionate distribution of infectious diseases like Ebola are a form of structural violence that warrants international intervention. In the field of global public health, structural violence is a concept used to describe health inequities and to draw attention to the differential risks for infection in the Global
South, and among those already infected, for adverse consequences including death, injury and illness. This Article clarifies how the concept of structural violence can be operationalized in law. In particular, it illustrates the ways in which the international actors can facilitate conditions for structural violence by analyzing the international public health and peace and security regimes. This Article has several important contributions. First, the way crises are conceptualized needs to be expanded beyond merely addressing direct physical violence internationally, but to also include remedying structural violence. Additionally, this study indicates that the complicated relationship between infectious diseases and conflict warrants more robust attention and resources. Finally, shared international responsibility norms should be developed to assist in expanding the tools available for the protection of human rights and the alleviation of large-scale human suffering caused by infectious diseases like Ebola

4:00 pm Lecture
Global 1968 Film and Discussion: The Nigerian Civil War and Its Impact on Nation-Building in Africa
Location:
WWPH 4130
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

The UCIS Global 68 Series draws themes from events that took place around the world in 1968. As part of this series, the African Studies Program will host an event called "Global 68-The Nigerian Civil War". We will be showing a documentary entitled "Biafra and Nigeria War 1967-1970," followed by discussion of the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War (July 6, 1967 - January 3, 1970) and the ramifications it is having on African society today. Our speaker, Edmond Keller (Department of Political Science, UCLA), will discuss the causes, aftermath and legacy of the conflict and the lessons for independence, democracy and freedom.

4:30 pm Lecture
Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
See Details

Drawing on interviews with one-and-a-half and second generation Salvadoran immigrant youth, Exiled Home details the temporal, spatial, and biographical disjunctures that the Salvadoran civil war and emigration to the United States caused in these young people’s lives, as well as the strategies through which youth have sought to overcome such ruptures. Denied full membership in the United States for at least some portion of their lives, many youth also encountered silences or an “un-knowing” of conditions in El Salvador, the nature of the civil war, and their own histories. As they negotiated gaps between belonging and exclusion, pasts and futures, normality and abnormality, and El Salvador and the United States, these youth became part of U.S. neighborhoods, encountered racism and discrimination, developed and rejected particular social identities in school, qualified for or lost legal status in the U.S., learned particular versions of Spanish and English, and repositioned themselves within families and between countries. In so doing, some became activists, seeking passage of the Federal and California DREAM Act, founding transnational and transuniversity student organizations, and producing new literature that creates space and marks time for their generation. Through these and other strategies, youth re/membered, that is, they sought an accountability that would enable them to realize a more just future.

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

6:30 pm Lecture
La Maquina de Proyectar Sueños
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures
See Details

La escritora argentina Cecilia Szperling hablará de su trabajo en torno a la escritura del yo y del concepto de lecturas expandidas. Hará referencia a su propia obra literaria y perfomática y a las distintas formas d eponer la literatura en escena. La autora leerá extractos de su novela, La máquina de proyectar sueños (Fábula autobiográfica), y hablará de sus fuentes de insporación. se poryectarán asi mismo extractos de la performance basada en la novela.

Friday, February 16

3:00 pm Presentation
Enlightened by Oblivion
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning--Humanities Center
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures
See Details

Presentation and round table follow by a reception

Enlightened by Oblivion explores different uses of materials labelled as “found”: anonymous photographs, old news shows, recycled television shows, and found footage. The “found” materials, almost by definition, had to be lost previously: illuminated by forgetfulness. In the discarding, in the abandonment, there is an insubordinate energy, an unexpected illumination that cannot be found in that which is deliberate, in what was searched for and found. In this sense, even one’s own material can become “found” material. This talk features unreleased material.

Andrés Di Tella is a filmmaker, writer, and curator based in Buenos Aires, Argentine. He has directed: Montoneros, una historia (1995), Macedonio Fernández (1995), Prohibido (1997), La televisión y yo (2002), Fotografías (2007), El país del Diablo (2008) Hachazos (2011), ¡Volveremos a las montañas! (2012), Máquina de sueños (2013), El ojo en el cielo (2013) and 327 cuadernos (2015)

Enlightened by Oblivion will be followed by a roundtable discussion featuring: Laura Podalsky, the Ohio State University, and Rocio Gordon, Christopher Newport University. 

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

3:00 pm Lecture
Matter of Death
Location:
Anthropology Lounge, 3106 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

At a moment when marriage and childbirth are on the decline, employment is increasingly short-term and precarious, and more and more people are living longer and all alone, sociality is changing in Japan. Away from the workplace or the family, ever more attention is placed on a free-floating, mobile but responsible self. Consistent with this streamlining of the social is a new trend in “simple living” spurred by de-clutter guru, Marie Kondo. Encouraged to detach from all but the most essential, most joyful of personal possessions, the stress is on matter that materializes life in a very particular way. But in this presentist, self-oriented lifestyle, what happens at the time of death? To those possessions the deceased has left behind, and to bodies of the dead, in cases when there is no social other to attend to these persons and things? Asking what the matter of death is in an age of decluttered belonging(s), I examine new businesses emerging in Japan (ihin seiri gaisha) that help clients sort through the possessions left behind, or that they may leave behind themselves, at the moment of death. Special clean-up of the "lonely dead" is one of their services—sanitizing the landscape of the waste left behind by a wounded sociality.

Anne Allison is the author of Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club (1994), Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan (1996), Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination (2006), and Precarious Japan (2013). She is currently conducting research on new demographic/social trends in Japan involving death, solo sociality, and self-management of mortuary and post-mortem arrangements.

Sunday, February 18

2:00 pm Lecture
A New Korean War?
Location:
Church of the Redeemer, 5700 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15217
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Tensions are heating up over North Korea's nuclear program, intensified by an exchange of insults between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Will the conflict between the two countries result in war? Why does North Korea want nuclear weapons? For aggression? Or for self-defense? Do South Koreans regard a nuclearized North as an existential threat or as something they can live with? How would a new Korean War end?

Monday, February 19

4:30 pm Lecture
Bichurin's Journeys: Russian Encounters with Asia in the Tsarist Era
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Professor Sunderland received his BA in Russian Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and his masters and doctorate in history from Indiana University. Since joining the department in 1996, he has taught in the fields of Russia and the Soviet Union, modern Europe, and world history.

Sunderland's principal research interests are in the history of the Russian Empire in the modern period. In conducting his work, he has lived and traveled extensively in the Russian Federation and the other states of the former Soviet Union.

His most recent book, The Baron's Cloak: A History of the Russian Empire in War and Revolution, appeared with Cornell University Press in 2014 and has been recognized with publication awards from the Association for the Study of the Nationalities (ASN), the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES), and the Ohio Academy of History.

Sunderland's current book-in-progress focuses on the history of Russia's encounters with Eurasia and the broader world in the 18th century.

In July 2015, he began a position as co-editor for the journal Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History.

Tuesday, February 20

6:00 pm Performance
Karuppi
Location:
Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council along with Department of Theatre Arts and Gender Sexuality & Women's Studies Program
See Details

The play, originally created in Tamil, is a collection of writing by and about Tamil speaking women who traveled across oceans from Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka for work or were displaced by war. The script consists of poetry, traditional folk songs, excerpts from short stories and government documents. The stories date back to the early 19th Century to the present day. While translating the play in English, the Marapachchi team found that the play works on many registers. While the play is about Tamil-speaking women, the incidents and stories may resonate with other contexts and histories.

Karuppi is a production of Marapachchi Theatre, a feminist theatre collective based in Madras, India.

The play is mostly in English with some Tamil sections. Written translation of Tamil will be provided.

Ponni Arasu is a queer feminist researcher, historian, and activist from Tamilnadu, India. She is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto and holds a Masters in History from Jawaharlal Nehru University, as well as a Bachelor degree in Law. Ponni has worked on issues related to sexuality, labour, law and caste in South Asia as an activist, researcher and legal practitioner. She has worked in multiple capacities as an activist and theatre practitioner in northern and eastern Sri Lanka for the past twelve years. Her last major project was to initiate the creation of an archive of oral history on women in social movements in different parts of India in the 1970s. This project was commissioned by the Indian Association of Women Studies and Zubaan Books. Her PhD research addresses the history of Tamil Nadu in Southern India (1950-70) studying the formation of publics from a gender perspective.

6:30 pm Film
El Amparo (Venezuela)
Location:
G-23 Public Health Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

El Amparo (Rober Calzadilla, Venezuela, 2016)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie

At the end of the 80's, by the creeks of the Arauca river, near the Colombian-Venezuelan border, two men survived the brutality of a shooting in which 14 of their mates were killed. They claimed to be mere fishermen, but the Venezuelan army accused them to be guerrilla fighters, intimidating them in every possible way and even attempting to remove them from the cell where they were guarded by a policeman. Their neighbors prevented their transfer, but the pressure they faced to give in and submit the official version was overwhelming.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8D0JMRxF54

For more information, please visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

Wednesday, February 21

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, February 22 until Saturday, February 24

8:00 am Symposium
Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Thursday, February 22

12:00 pm Lecture
Justice and the Global City
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Cities in Transformation Initiative
See Details

Dr. Hoover is a lecturer in Political Theory in the School of Politics and International Politics at Queen Mary University of London. He has worked previously at City University London, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also received his PhD. For the past several years he has focused on the use of human rights by diverse political movements in order to take the measure of both their limitations and their promise for a more radically democratic world. His latest research project rethinks questions of global justice by focusing on the injustices experienced in contemporary urban life to develop an argument in favor of more inclusive and democratic cities. Dr. Hoover's work on the human right to housing and the right to the city have led to collaborations with housing rights groups in the USA and the UK, including the FOCUS E15 campaign in East London. He is also the co-convener and chair of the BISA Ethics and World Politics Working Group.

4:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Gendered Language: Tradition or Barrier to Equality?
Location:
4200 Posvar Hall- CLAS Reception Area
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Round Table Discussion
Gendered Language: Tradition or Barrier to Equality?

Thursday, February 22nd at 4:00 pm
Center for Latin American Studies
4200 Posvar Hall (inside the UCIS office)

The CLAS Round Table Discussions are monthly Panoramas-sponsored events meant to facilitate meaningful dialogues on current issues in Latin America.

Pizza will be provided!

4:00 pm Lecture
Rebellious Youth and the Global 1960s: Politics, Punk Rock, and Propaganda in Cold War Japan
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center
4:30 pm Lecture
Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

6:00 pm Lecture
A Discussion on the Iran Nuclear Deal with Former Ambassador Dennis Jett
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Pitt Global Affairs Club
See Details

Professor Dennis Jett is a distinguished diplomat and academic, having served as U.S. ambassador to Peru and Mozambique under the Clinton administration. His experience and expertise focus on international relations, foreign administration, and American foreign policy.

Snacks Provided.

7:00 pm Performance
Black History Month Performance
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Friday, February 23 until Sunday, February 25

(All day) Seminar
Global Health Mini Course
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

With each emerging infectious disease, the interconnectedness of populations around the globe becomes more pronounced. Diseases not only affect the health of communities, but they have a profound impact on political, economic, and social stability within countries and regions. This course engages the interdisciplinary nature of global health by approaching the issue through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) developed by the United Nations. The SDGs range in focus from good health and well-being to gender equality to clean water and sanitation to affordable, clean energy. By engaging the ways that health has a stake in these goals, the course will bring the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and CMU to understand and address the issue surrounding global health from a myriad of perspectives and avenues. With a project-based focus, the course will assist students in engaging and impacting their local community though a global issue.

To register before January 26 (add/drop) PS 1903-1010 (10182). To register after January 26 please contact Veronica Dristas, Associate Director.

Friday, February 23

9:30 am Panel Discussion
What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

12:00 pm Lecture
La Tierra y el Agua en los Andes--The land and the water in the Andes
Location:
Latin American Lecture Room 171B – Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Library Systems
See Details

This talk is about the Andean conception about land, water, and the greater nature, from a realist approach and a fantastic realism based perspective.

The talk is in Spanish!
Lunch will be provided.

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Variance in the Latino Voting Turnout: Education, Income, and Voting Restrictions
Location:
A521 Crabtree Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Center for Health Equity
See Details

Networking Meeting
February 23, 1 – 2:30pm
Location A521 Crabtree Hall

We will discuss:
Variance in the Latino Voting Turnout: Education, Income, and Voting Restrictions
Dr. Scott Morgenstern, Political Science
This event is intended for all of us interested in Latino Studies to meet and start a conversation
Jointly presented by the Center for Health Equity and
the Center for Latin American Studies

4:00 pm Lecture
Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

5:00 pm Film
Film Screening: Tsunami Punx
Location:
548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
5:00 pm Reading Group
CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
See Details

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

6:00 pm Cultural Event
This is Africa: Gala!
Location:
0'Hara Ballroom
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with African Student Organization (ASO); School of Medicine
See Details

Fri, 2/23: This is Africa: Gala!
Time: 6:00PM
Details: Join us at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, the ASO, and ASP for ‘This is Africa: Gala’! " This is Africa" is a gala that aims to celebrate the achievements of people from the African diaspora as well as the people who have invested time in the continent and the people. This event also aims to bring together students, faculty and community members in a environment where they can network and get to know each other. This is a black tie/ traditional wear event so come looking nice, eat and enjoy great company, performances and music. Ballroom of the O’Hara Student Center, at 4042 O’Hara Street. Please RSVP and register your attendance tickets beforehand. Tickets limited for attendance...

6:00 pm Presentation
CERIS Book Discussion, 2/23
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History
See Details

Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane. Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at UPitt. Discussion at 6:00 PM. Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt will facilitate the book discussion. Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard.

Saturday, February 24

(All day) Teacher Training
Teach Africa Workshop—K-16 Educators, Indigenous Wisdom and Culture
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with School of Education
See Details

Saturday, February 24, 2017, 9am-3:30pm

Join us at the University of Pittsburgh for the Teach Africa Workshop – Indigenous Wisdom and Culture on February 24, 2017. Learn how to use free multi-media curriculum units to Strengthen the teaching of African Studies in your classroom.

Breakout sessions will include discussions and demonstrations on integrating African Studies material into your classroom. Several examples are listed: #Me too: Connecting gender issues from Ethiopia to America, Through an African Lens: Positive Racial Identity Development, Best Practices for Integrating Languages Spoken in Africa, and even Incorporating Indigenous Ways of Knowing into STEAM Classrooms.
Speakers include experts from the Carnegie Museum of History, Fulbright Hays Educators who designed cutting edge multi-media Ethiopian curriculum units, and in the field language teachers.
All teachers and administrators are welcome whether you are an expert on teaching Africa or this is the first time you have even considered it.
Act 48 credits will be available to interested attendees with
Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register with Anna-Maria.

Contact Anna-Maria Karnes at 412-624-8143 or awk19@pitt.edu if you have any questions.

8:00 am Conference
Pittsburgh Asia Consortium Undergraduate Research Conference
Location:
David Lawrence Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

The annual Pittsburgh Asia Consortium Undergraduate Research Conference is the largest undergraduate conference on Asian studies in Pennsylvania. Presentations come from many disciplines and on any part of geographical Asia, including the Middle East.

2:00 pm Performance
Creative Survival, Creative Performance: Perusing the New Narrative
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

This is the culmination of a month of workshops with Pitt students exploring the creative process and utilizing autobiographical history as a vehicle for performance. Using movement, text, text-writing, vocalizations, theatre games, memory exercises, autobiographical musings, and storytelling, Rhodessa Jones will demonstrate her use of "art as social activism" to create social change.

3:45 pm Panel Discussion
Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Monday, February 26

5:30 pm Lecture
Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Sociology
See Details

Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
by Dr. Carlo Tognato, Universidad Nacional, Colombia (Director, Center for Social Studies, National University of Colombia)
5:30 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Carlo Tognato. Profesor Asociado del Departamento de Sociología de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Bogotá. Se desempeña  actualmente como director del Centro de Estudios Sociales. Es también Faculty Fellow del Center for Cultural Sociology en Yale University y Fellow del Indo-Pacific Governance Research Centre de la University of Adelaide. Tiene un Ph.D. en Ciencia Política (UCLA) y en Economía Política (Universitá di Ancona, Italia), un MPhil en Relaciones Internacionales (University of Oxford) y un pregrado en Economía Política (Universitá Bocconi, Milán).

Sus intereses se enfocan principalmente en la sociología cultural, la sociología económica, y en particular sobre las relaciones entre sociedad civil y mercado, así como en la sociología cultural de la violencia.  Sus publicaciones más recientes incluyen un libro publicado en 2012 en Nueva York con Palgrave-Macmillan sobre la influencia de la cultura sobre el funcionamiento de las instituciones monetarias (Central Bank Independence: Cultural Codes and Symbolic Performance) y otro libro editado por él que saldrá en 2015 con Harvard University y con la Universidad Nacional de Colombia sobre el papel de las prácticas creativas en las políticas públicas (Rethinking Cultural Agency: The Significance of Antanas Mockus).

Wednesday, February 28

2:00 pm Film
The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.