Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 1

12:30 pm Lecture
Studying Working-Class Culture & the History of Social Movements—Challenges & Possibilities
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture
5:00 pm Lecture
“Conversion Stories: Turning Communists into Nazis”
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Historians have long argued about the relationship between the workers and the Nazis. Did the Nazis betray the German working class or did they offer solutions to their problems? Answering these questions as part of a larger debate about politics and emotions means to pay close attention to the grievances and resentments that made possible the shift from class to race as the main category of identification. This lecture uses a little-known genre from the early 1930s known as Bewegungsromane (novels about the Nazi movement) to reconstruct the social(ist) imaginaries mobilized in the name of National Socialism. Today these Nazi conversion stories not only shed light on the politics of emotion that turned Communists into Nazis; they also model the symbolic convergence of nationalism, socialism, and populism in modern mass movements.

Friday, February 2

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

6:00 pm Lecture
Keynote Address: A Woman for the 21st Century
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will discuss the Medea Project and the process of creating productive dialogue to examine such conditions as racism, sexism, homophobia, addictions, and fear that greatly affect our daily lives. In addition, she will play video excerpts from her work and perform excerpts from her various writings and scripts.

Monday, February 5

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Tuesday, February 6

4:30 pm Lecture
Planning Postindustrialism in Pittsburgh and Beyond
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Tracy Neumann specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century North American history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. She teaches courses on twentieth-century U.S. history, urban history, research methods, and public history. Before pursuing a PhD, she worked for several years as a consultant for a cultural resource management firm, and her professional experience as a public history practitioner led her to help develop Wayne State's MA Program in Public History, for which she serves as the coordinator. She also co-edits the Global Urban History blog and sits on the editorial boards of Urban History and Temple University Press's Pennsylvania History book series.

More information about the event TBA.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session, we will be reading Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones and hear from Pitt Prof. Felix Germain (Africana Studies).

6:30 pm Film
Rojo Amanecer (Mexico)
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Rojo Amanecer (Jorge Fons, Mexico, 1990)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

Rojo Amenecer is a film about the Tlatelolco Massacre in the section of Tlatelolco in Mexico City in the evening of October 2, 1968. It focuses on the day of a middle-class Mexican family living in one of the apartment buildings surrounding the Plaza de Tlatelolco (also known as the Plaza de las Tres Culturas)[1] and is based on testimonials from witnesses and victims.

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Thursday, February 8

4:00 pm Lecture
1968: The Ambiguous Consequences of a Failed Revolution
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

The multiple uprisings of 1968 challenged authorities worldwide, and led to many reforms, but the insurgents misunderstood the nature of their insurgencies, and this misunderstanding drastically limited their effects. They did not add up to a revolution. Rather, in their multiplicity, they were something far more complicated and ambiguous: the culmination of an era of incremental progressive change, a signal of the collapse of conventional liberalism, and a prologue to deep cultural changes as well as grim backlash

Friday, February 9

12:00 pm Lecture
A Conversation with Samir Lakhani
Location:
Alumni Hall, 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, David Berg Center for Ethics and Leadership, innovation Institute and and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

Samir was a college student volunteering in a rural Cambodian village when he witnessed firsthand the spread of disease due to poor personal hygiene. Today, Samir’s non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, recycles bars of soap from hotels in Cambodia and distributes them to those in need.

3:00 pm Lecture
Healthy Global Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship
Location:
William Pitt Union 630
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Director's Office, Global Studies Center and Study Abroad Office along with Center for Cross Cultural Leadership and Development
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Interested in a career with a non-profit—or in developing a new NGO that will change lives? You’re sure to gain insight and inspiration from Samir.

5:30 pm Lecture
Fireside Chat
Location:
University Club, Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, innovation Institute and World Affairs Council
See Details

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Samir joins Audrey Murrell, associate dean of Pitt’s College of Business Administration, for a conversation about ethics, leadership and global entrepreneurship in the 21st century.

Monday, February 12

4:30 pm Workshop
Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall- History Department Lounge
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of
See Details

Junior Faculty Manuscript Workshop on James Pickett's manuscript: Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis. Comments by Professor Devin DeWeese from the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Tuesday, February 13

12:00 pm Workshop
Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Arts
See Details

Artist-in-residence Rhodessa Jones will offer a brief presentation and lead a discussion on using performance-based pedagogies to teach Global Studies. Jones is an actress, teacher, director, and writer, perhaps best known for the Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women and HIV Circle, which is a performance workshop designed to achieve personal and social transformation with incarcerated women and women living with HIV.

4:00 pm Lecture
Archive & Event: Mexico, 1968
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS)
See Details

Samuel Steinberg is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature at University of Southern California. Steinberg’s research and teaching engage modern and contemporary Latin American literature and visual culture, as well as critical theory and political thought.

He is the author of Photopoetics at Tlatelolco: Afterimages of Mexico, 1968 (University of Texas Press, 2016). Currently he is finishing a book on literature and debt, “Ghostscripts: Inheritance of Juan Rulfo,” and beginning another, “The Speculative Image,” on political conceptuality and visual form.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the ‘year that changed the world.’ UCIS is commemorating this with our Global Legacies of 1968 series.

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events

4:30 pm Workshop
Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Thursday, February 15

4:00 pm Lecture
Global 1968 Film and Discussion: The Nigerian Civil War and Its Impact on Nation-Building in Africa
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

The UCIS Gloabl 68 Series draws themes from events that took place around the world in 1968. As part of this series, the African Studies Program will be showing a documentary entitled "Biafra and Nigeria War 1967-1970". This will be followed by a panel discussion on the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War (July 6, 1967 - January 3, 1970). Our panel will discuss the causes, aftermath and legacy of the conflict and the lessons for independence, democracy and freedom. Our invited panel consists of Edmond Keller from UCLA, Joshua Forest from La Roche University and Moses Ochonu from Vanderbilt.

4:30 pm Lecture
Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
See Details

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

4:30 pm Lecture
Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Susan Bibler Coutin holds a Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology and is professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society and the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, where she served as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the Graduate Division from 2010-2017. Her research has examined social, political, and legal activism surrounding immigration issues, particularly immigration from El Salvador to the United States.Her newest book, Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence (Duke University Press, 2016) examines the experiences of 1.5 generation migrants, that is, individuals who were born in El Salvador but raised in the United States. Based on interviews with 1.5 generation Salvadorans in Southern California and in El Salvador, this book explores the power and limitations of nation-based categories of membership.

6:30 pm Film
327 Cuadernos (Argentina)
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

327 Cuadernos (Andres Di Tella, Argentina, 2015)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

Ricardo Piglia, one of the great narrators of Hispanic language, returns to Argentina after many years of living abroad. It is proposed to review exhaustively, for the first time, the 327 notebooks that constitute his private diary.

327 Cuadernos Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR2EAbhaCs

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

8:00 pm Film
Salam Neighbor
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor
See Details

In an effort to better understand refugee life, [the filmmakers] spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, [they] were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. [Their] experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.

Friday, February 16

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Tuesday, February 20

6:30 pm Film
El Amparo (Venezuela)
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

El Amparo (Rober Calzadilla, Venezuela, 2016)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

At the end of the 80's, by the creeks of the Arauca river, near the Colombian-Venezuelan border, two men survived the brutality of a shooting in which 14 of their mates were killed. They claimed to be mere fishermen, but the Venezuelan army accused them to be guerrilla fighters, intimidating them in every possible way and even attempting to remove them from the cell where they were guarded by a policeman. Their neighbors prevented their transfer, but the pressure they faced to give in and submit the official version was overwhelming.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8D0JMRxF54

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, February 21

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, February 22

4:00 pm Lecture
Rebellious Youth and the Global 1960s: Politics, Punk Rock, and Propaganda in Cold War Japan
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
4:00 pm Lecture
Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

7:00 pm Performance
Black History Month Performance
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Friday, February 23 until Saturday, February 24

8:00 am Symposium
Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
See Details

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

Friday, February 23

9:30 am Panel Discussion
What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
4:00 pm Lecture
Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
5:00 pm Reading Group
CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
See Details

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

6:00 pm Presentation
CERIS Book Discussion, 2/23
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History
See Details

Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane. Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at UPitt. Discussion at 6:00 PM. Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt will facilitate the book discussion. Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard.

Saturday, February 24

2:00 pm Performance
Creative Survival, Creative Performance: Perusing the New Narrative
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

This is the culmination of a month of workshops with Pitt students exploring the creative process and utilizing autobiographical history as a vehicle for performance. Using movement, text, text-writing, vocalizations, theatre games, memory exercises, autobiographical musings, and storytelling, Rhodessa Jones will demonstrate her use of "art as social activism" to create social change.

3:45 pm Panel Discussion
Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History

Monday, February 26

5:30 pm Lecture
   Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Sociology
See Details

Carlo Tognato. Profesor Asociado del Departamento de Sociología de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Bogotá. Se desempeña  actualmente como director del Centro de Estudios Sociales. Es también Faculty Fellow del Center for Cultural Sociology en Yale University y Fellow del Indo-Pacific Governance Research Centre de la University of Adelaide. Tiene un Ph.D. en Ciencia Política (UCLA) y en Economía Política (Universitá di Ancona, Italia), un MPhil en Relaciones Internacionales (University of Oxford) y un pregrado en Economía Política (Universitá Bocconi, Milán).

Sus intereses se enfocan principalmente en la sociología cultural, la sociología económica, y en particular sobre las relaciones entre sociedad civil y mercado, así como en la sociología cultural de la violencia.  Sus publicaciones más recientes incluyen un libro publicado en 2012 en Nueva York con Palgrave-Macmillan sobre la influencia de la cultura sobre el funcionamiento de las instituciones monetarias (Central Bank Independence: Cultural Codes and Symbolic Performance) y otro libro editado por él que saldrá en 2015 con Harvard University y con la Universidad Nacional de Colombia sobre el papel de las prácticas creativas en las políticas públicas (Rethinking Cultural Agency: The Significance of Antanas Mockus).

Wednesday, February 28

2:00 pm Film
The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.