Events in UCIS

Thursday, March 1 until Saturday, March 3

(All day) Conference
Society for French Historical Studies Conference
Location:
Hilton, Pittsburgh
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Society for French Historical Studies

Thursday, March 1

(All day) Cultural Event
THE 7TH ANNUAL MODEL AFRICAN UNION SIMULATION
Location:
WILLIAM PITT UNION ASSEMBLY ROOM & BALLROOM
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

In 2011, a group of African Studies students at the University of Pittsburgh participated in the college level Model African Union at the Howard University in Washington DC. After their experience in the simulation, they felt the need to promote the study of Africa among high school students in the Pittsburgh and South-Western Pennsylvania region. With the assistance of The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh, the Pitt High School Model African Union (MAU) was launched in 2012 as an experiential pedagogical method of teaching American students about Africa. The Pitt MAU serves as an educational simulation that provides opportunities for high school students to learn about Africa by studying the African Union and its inner workings. Students learn the role, structure, and performance of the African Union (AU) while searching for solutions to Africa’s key economic, social, and political problems. Agenda items and countries are assigned to the participating schools in advance, to allow for adequate preparations for the daylong conference. Under the guidance of their teachers, students study research issues facing the AU member states and prepare to hold debates and vote on resolutions that address these issues. This year, 2018, is the seventh year of the MAU hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

9:00 am Career Counselling
UCIS International Career Toolkit Series: Site Visit to The Braddock Free Store
Location:
Braddock, PA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Braddock, a city that lost 90% of its population, homes, and businesses, is reinventing and revitalizing through the efforts of many citizens including its first lady Gisele Fetterman. In 2012 she founded The Braddock Free Store that works to find new uses for donated items that still have value, turning donations into valued treasures.

Join CLAS and UCIS as we go to visit The Braddock Free Store. This trip is limited to 10 students so register ASAP using the link here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf_XDWyQXw3DN4-JSxYTQ80BW4SVBns...

3:00 pm Film
Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

Dusan Makavejev’s Love Affair provides us with an example of cinematic reflexivity, which can be defined as any technique that reminds the viewer that he or she is watching a film. Reflexivity foregrounds the fact that film meaning is a function of a set of codes with ideological implications rather than a transparent reflection of reality. Reflexivity can be achieved through intertextuality, exaggeration of cinematic conventions or conspicuous narration that reminds us of the author’s mark on the text. These techniques are all in evidence in Love Affair, whose textual heterogeneity calls into question the earnestness of cinematic (including socialist) realism as well as the official ideologies of state communism. As Thomas Elsaesser notes, Love Affair juxtaposes three sites of meaning: “the liberating intimacy of a sexual relationship…, the public world of abstract didacticism and cold rationality…, [and] the memory of the Russian Revolution and Tito’s national liberation war”. (Elsaesser, European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood, p. 322) Our understanding of Makavejev’s view of 1960s Yugoslavian society depends on our interpretation of the ironic and tragic relationship between these three sites of meaning. (Alex Lykidis, "Love Affair," Critical Commons)

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

4:45 pm Panel Discussion
1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Love Affair (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Irina Livezeanu, Department of History

Discussants: Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Friday, March 2

9:00 am Presentation
High School Japanese Speech Contest
Location:
Assembly Room, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Japan America Society of Pennsylvania

Saturday, March 3

8:30 am Workshop/Teacher Training--Area Studies/Teacher Training--Language
French Immersion Institute Workshop
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Samedi 3 mars 2018:
La situation linguistique et culturelle en Bretagne, Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon

Samedi 21 avril 2018:
Françoise Giroud & Simone Veil: deux écrivaines politiques pour la couse des femmes
Conférencière: Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh

Program runs from 9:00-13:30, with an 8:30 breakfast and 12:30 lunch included.

Registration deadlines: February 26th for March 3rd workshop; April 16th for April 21st workshop.
Enclose a $20.00 check for each program ($40.00 for both). Fee includes ACT 48 credit-4 -hours for each program, breakfast and lunch.) Send check payable to the University of Pittsburgh. To facilitate our records, please write on check memo: (French Immersion)

Bonnie Adair-Hauck: adairhauck@gmail.com

2:00 pm Film
Film Screening: Bridge
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Bengali Association of Pittsburgh

Sunday, March 4

9:00 am Curriculum Development/Teacher Training
Interdisciplinary Global Working Group for Educators
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

Free parking, Act 48 credit hours, $300 stipend, and a mini-grant (up to $200 for your team) for curricular materials of your choosing.

Tuesday, March 6

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

This reading group for educators explores literary texts from a global perspective. Content specialists offer stimulating presentations of the work and its context, and together we brainstorm innovative pedagogical practices for incorporating the text and its themes into the curriculum. After a successful partnership with City of Asylum and their authors-in-residence in the fall, our series continues this spring with the theme of literature and authoritarianism. At this session, Prof. Jacques Bromberg (Classics) will lead a discussion of Sophocles' Antigone.

Wednesday, March 7

12:00 pm Workshop
Professional Development Webinars - Introducing the Herder Institute: Collections, Funding Opportunities, and Higher Education Partnerships
Location:
http://aseees.org/programs/webinars
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe
See Details

This webinar is the second in a professional development series co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center. It will use the Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe as an example to explore non-university research institutions prevalent in Europe. First, participants will receive information about the Institute's collections and holdings (including 5 million newspaper clippings, close to 700,000 images, 40,000 historical maps, a library with half a million items etc.). Participants will learn about the fellowship and partnership programs available, in addition to the Institute’s profile in the field of Digital Humanities. Using the Herder Institute as an example, Peter Haslinger will also elaborate on networking strategies on the global level and the forms of cooperation in German academia to foster strategic partnerships between non-university institutions and universities.

To register, visit http://aseees.org/programs/webinars.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Next Webinar

April 11, 12 p.m. (EST)
Doing Research on Eastern Europe in the EU: Research Infrastructures, Grant Models, and Career Mobility

Saturday, March 10

8:30 am Conference
Intersections of Colonialism and Medicine in East Asia
Location:
Conference Room A, University Club
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with National Shimane University, Institute of Taiwan History and Academia Sinica

Sunday, March 11

8:30 am Conference
Intersections of Colonialism and Medicine in East Asia
Location:
Conference Room A, University Club
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with National Shimane University, Institute of Taiwan History and Academia Sinica

Monday, March 12

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #1
Location:
Conference Room 700, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

4:00 pm Film/Lecture
Film Screening: “Confrontation: Paris 1968”
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

Join us for a screening of “Confrontation: Paris 1968” and a conversation with one of the filmmakers, Pitt’s own Emeritus Professor of History, Seymour Drescher.

4:30 pm Presentation
The Maritime History of the Haitian Revolution
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence on behalf of Department of History
See Details

The Atlantic History Seminar Presents:

Julius Scott
University of Michigan

The Maritime History of the Haitian Revolution:
A Discussion with Julius Scott of his forthcoming book, The Common Wind

Commentary by Robin D.G. Kelley (UCLA), and Peter Linebaugh (University of Toledo)

5:00 pm Lecture
Erased: Holocaust Memory in the Ukrainian-Romanian-Moldovan Borderlands
Location:
502 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Jewish Studies Program
5:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #2
Location:
Conference Room #700, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

Tuesday, March 13

12:00 pm Lecture
The European Approach to Choice of Court Agreements
Location:
Barco Building, Alcoa Room
Announced by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence on behalf of Center for International Legal Education
See Details

In her presentation, Professor Ragno will discuss the special characteristics of choice of court agreements in the EU, and will touch on the impact on these agreements of Brexit. Prof. Ragno graduated in Law (J.D.) with honors at the University of Bologna and obtained her PhD degree from the University of Verona. Her teaching and scholarship span Private International Law, European Law International Commercial Law and International Arbitration.

She is a Visiting Distinguished Fulbright Chair at the University of Pittsburgh for spring 2018.

4:30 pm Workshop
Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Wednesday, March 14

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - May 1968 and the Legacies of Protest in France
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Part of the ESC Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series and its series of Virtual Roundtables, Conversations on Europe.

2:30 pm Career Counselling
UCIS International Career Toolkit Series: Site Visit To Global Switchboard
Location:
The Global Switchboard
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Having a global perspective is often taken to mean traveling to other countries, and keeping up with news around the world…and although that can be a part of developing a global lens, there are ways to develop a paradigm of global concern in Pittsburgh. Opportunities to foster diversity and inclusion are everywhere, and The Global Switchboard is a network organization that works to highlight some of those opportunities. Come visit and hear from The Global Switchboard at its co-working space in Lawrenceville, where you'll also get to interact with other global organizations that are part of the network.

Meet with Nathan Darity, Executive Director and Alaa Mohamed, Program Coordinator and with leaders of NGOs. Learn about internships opportunities at the Switchboard and more!

We will depart Pitt at 2:30 PM and return by 4:30 PM. Students should meet in the Global Studies Office, 4100 Posvar Hall by 2:25 PM on the 14th.

Register to attend here: https://goo.gl/forms/ELywsm52SlgKRYSN2

5:00 pm Reading Group
Book Discussion with Deepa Iyer
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Alliance for South Asians in Pittsburgh
5:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #3
Location:
#700 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

7:00 pm Lecture
A Conversation with Deepa Iyer
Location:
Room 548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Alliance for South Asians in Pittsburgh
See Details

Deepa Iyer is a South Asian American activist, writer, and lawyer. Please join us for a conversation about her recent book We Too Sing America which explores how emerging communities of color and immigrants can transform America's changing racial landscape. Through storytelling and policy analysis around racial flashpoint, Iyer traces the impact of post 9/11 national insecurities, anti-immigrant sentiment and racial anxiety on South Asian, Muslim, Arab and Sikh communities.

Reception to start at 6:15 pm ahead of the lecture. Event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 15

4:30 pm Lecture
Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
8:00 pm Film
8 Borders, 8 Days
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor
See Details

A single mother shows us the consequences of closing America’s doors to families fleeing war. With no answer to her application for resettlement in the US, and every other path to safety closed off, a smuggler’s raft to Europe was the only way out. 8 Borders, 8 Days is her story; the intimate details of why a fiercely-determined mother is willing to risk her children’s lives for a better future and an immersive experience of their eight-day journey to safety.

Friday, March 16

(All day) Student Club Activity
Euro Challenge
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Launched in 2006, Euro Challenge is an exciting educational opportunity for 9th and 10th grade high school students to learn about the European Union (EU) and the euro. Teams of three to five students are asked to make presentations answering specific questions about the European economy and the single currency, the euro. They are also asked to pick one member country of the “euro area” (the 19 EU member countries that have adopted the euro so far), to examine an economic problem at the country level, and to identify policies for responding to that problem.

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

This is the last installment of a 4-part Global Studies Center series to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

3:30 pm Colloquium
Archaeology for the People: A Review of Public Archeology in China
Location:
3106 WWPH
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Department of Anthropology
See Details

"Public Archeology" has become a fashionable buzz-word in China in recent years. As an experienced and active presenter of archeology to the public, Dr. Wang will talk about the current situation, problems and prospects of public archeology in China. He will also discuss activities carried out by the Center for Public Archeology at Capital Normal University.

5:30 pm Film
Film Screening: A Taxi Driver
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with East Asian Languages and Literatures, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and Film Studies Program
See Details

A Taxi Driver (2017) directed by Jang Hoon. The 1980 Gwangju Massacre, a cataclysmic event in South Korea's march towards democracy, is revisited through the eyes of a German reporter (Jürgen Hinzpeter) and a Korean cabbie (Kim Sa-bok) who helps him get the truth about Gwangju out to the world.

Saturday, March 17

9:00 am Teacher Training
Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

5:30 pm Performance
Dhirana National Dance Competition
Location:
Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

Doors open at 4:45 pm. Show starts at 5:30 pm. All proceeds will be donated to the Birmingham Free Clinic.

Monday, March 19

10:00 am Conference
Seminar on Cultures of the Lusosphere
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and The Brazilian Consulate in New York
See Details

For more information on event, please visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/lusosphere-seminar

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #4
Location:
#700 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

1:00 pm Lecture
Garhwali Folk Traditions in 21st Century India
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Garhwal is a rich and diverse cultural region in Uttarakhand in the Himalaya mountains of North India. Following political agitation for separation from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand was established in 2000 as the 27th state within the Republic of India. Much of the Garhwal region can be understood both in terms of the sacred landscape of the Himalaya and in terms of intense pressure to develop infrastructure for pilgrimage, tourism, and economic growth. This pressure has had a profound impact on the fragile environment, on the cultural history of folk traditions in the mountains, and on the lives of musicians, artists, bards, and poets, who have been displaced by the construction of dams, by flooding caused by deforestation, and because of road construction to accommodate pilgrims and tourists.

Professor Datta Ram Purohit, Garhwal's leading authority on the performing arts, recognized poet in the tradition of Garhwali bards, and accomplished director of the regions theatrical tradition, Pandava Lila, will speak on these issues, with specific reference to a catastrophic flood in the sacred Kedarnath Valley, 2013.

3:00 pm Lecture
Syndemic Diabetes: Entanglements with Poverty, Trauma, and AIDS
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Mendenhall will introduce the concept of syndics, a theory of how social and health problems travel together within and between populations. She will discuss the concept of syndemic diabetes (type 2) through the discussion of her mixed methods research among low-income urban communities int he United States, India, South Africa, and Kenya. In doing so, she argues that it is impossible to understand diabetes in such contexts without taking seriously the implications of poverty, trauma, mental illness, and AIDS.

4:30 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Department of History
See Details

China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway

Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University

Professor Jamie Monson became interested in Africa when she served as an agriculture volunteer for the Peace Corps in rural Kenya in 1980. She then completed her PhD in African History at UCLA, and took her first teaching position at Carleton College in 1991. In 2015, she accepted a position as a Professor of African History in the Department of History and Director of African Studies at Michigan State University. Monson’s early research focus was on agricultural and environmental history of southern Tanzania, and she has also worked on anti-colonial warfare in German East Africa. In the late 1990s, she began a new research project on the history of the TAZARA railway, built with Chinese development aid in Tanzania and Zambia in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Africa’s Freedom Railway, was published by Indiana University Press in 2011.

Most recently, Monson has been studying the history of China-Africa relations (and learning Chinese), and frequently performs research in China. Her new project is a study of technology transfer in the history of Chinese development assistance to Africa. A second project that she is also engaged in uses records of visits made by African women’s delegations to China during the Cultural Revolution to examine gendered aspects of civil diplomacy.

5:05 pm Film
Yemanjá: Wisdom from the African Heart of Brazil
Location:
Gold Room--University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies, Africana Studies, Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Film Studies, Humanities Center and Consulado do Brazil--New York
See Details

A documentary film about the condomble spiritual culture of Bahia, Brazil. Grounded in strong community and Earth-Based wisdom, this vibrant tradition evolved the ways of enslaved Africans. The film explores Candomblé's history, social challenges and triumphs through the voices of extraordinary women leaders, including the film's narrator Alice Walker.

Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, March 20

2:30 pm Lecture/Lecture Series / Brown Bag
ESC Science and Public Policy Lecture Series: Lessons for the U.S. from Denmark’s District Energy
Location:
BEH 1145
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Pitt Center for Energy
See Details

Niels Malskaer is a Commercial Advisor at the Embassy of Denmark in Washington, D.C., focused on District Energy and Combined Heat and Power, with years of experience in global energy strategy. For the last few years, Niels has been sharing Danish energy experiences with public and private actors across the U.S., through government and commercial activities. He has worked at numerous international organisations, based in Europe as well as the U.S., mainly focused on energy policy analysis, and translating energy planning experiences across the Atlantic.

3:03 pm Lecture
Periodismo y literatura en Jorge Luis Borges”
Location:
William Pitt Union, Dinning Room B
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and the Humanities Center
See Details

This talk will look at links between Borges and mass circulation media, with attention both to his presence in the media (in the cultural supplement of La Prensa, in the Revista Multicolor de los Sábados, in El Hogar and in later participation in newspapers and magazines) and to his reflections on the relations between journalism and literature. Sylvia Saítta is the author of Regueros de tinta: El diario Crítica en la década de 1920 and El escritor en el bosque de ladrillos: Una biografía de Roberto Arlt, the director of the Archivo Histórico de Revistas Argentinas (ahira.com.ar) and the editor of El oficio se afirma, vol. 9 of the Historia crítica de la literatura argentina.

5:00 pm Lecture
Thinking Water with Senegalese Film & Visual Culture
Location:
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning 602
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian, University of Pittsburgh Honors College, Humanities Center, Department of Film Studies and Graduate Program for Cultural Studies
6:00 pm Film
Salam Neighbor
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 125
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Hello Neighbor
See Details

Hello Neighbor is excited to announce our next community event, a screening of the award-winning documentary, Salam Neighbor, about a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan and the stories of people living there working to rebuild their lives. This event is free and open to the public but we do ask you to RSVP in advance!

In an effort to better understand refugee life, the filmmakers of Salam Neighbor spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, they were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. Their experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.

We recommend at a minimum age 12 and up for this screening.

Link to RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hello-neighbor-presents-salam-neighbor-a-do...

6:30 pm Film
La Tempestad (Mexico)
Location:
G-23 Public Health Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

La Tempestad (Tatiana Huezo, Mexico, 2016)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie

The emotional journeys of two women victimized by corruption and injustice in Mexico and of the love, dignity and resistance that allowed them to survive.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPxXzolGr6Q

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

9:00 pm Lecture
China's Constitutional Changes
Location:
218 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Global Citizen Lab

Wednesday, March 21 until Friday, March 23

10:00 am Conference
THE FUTURE OF BORGES STUDIES
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning--Humanities Center
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Humanities Center and and Honors College
See Details

Co-sponsored by the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, the Center for Latin American Studies, the Faculty Research Support Program of the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, the Humanities Center and the University Honors College.

Alberto Manguel Director, National Library of Argentina
Daniel Balderston Director, Borges Center, University of Pittsburgh
Laura Rosato and Germán Álvarez Co-Directors, Centro Borges
de Documentación, National Library of Argentina
Mariela Blanco Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata-Conicet
Sylvia Saítta Universidad de Buenos Aires-Conicet
M aría Celeste Martín Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Nora Benedict • Alfredo Alonso Estenoz • María Julia Rossi
Leonardo Pitlevnik • Sebastián Urli • Martín Gaspar • David Mundie

A conference to celebrate the new formal agreement for cooperation between the Borges Center of the University of Pittsburgh and the Centro Borges de Documentación of the Biblioiteca Nacional Mariano Moreno, the National Library of Argentina Full information will be available on the websites of the Borges Center (borges.pitt.edu) and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures (hispanic.pitt.edu).

Events will be held at the Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, except
for several workshops on Thursday March 22nd in the Digital Commons of the Hillman Library.

Wednesday, March 21

12:00 pm Lecture
“Vanity, Laziness, and Skepticism Still Possess Me. But I Continue to Fight...”: Tolstoy’s Aesthetic Cure for Doubt
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

From his earliest writing on art to his magisterial treatise What is Art? Tolstoy strenuously opposed the idea that aesthetic pleasure is merely sensuous pleasure, which might vary from person to person. He wanted to secure the objectivity and universality of aesthetic judgment, to identify not only what he or his milieu happened to consider true art, but what all people must consider true art. It was not enough for Tolstoy to say that the poems of the Decadents were not his cup of tea; he wished to say they were false and bad and anyone who liked them a corrupt, befuddled, opium-smoking fool—and to be justified in saying so. Why did Tolstoy object so strongly to the idea that our aesthetic response might be subjective? Why was he so zealous in his rejection of aesthetic subjectivism, when so many other artists, particularly in the later decades of the 19th century, accepted it? I will argue that resisting aesthetic subjectivism was not merely an artistic or political imperative for Tolstoy but an existential one. He saw objective aesthetic judgment as a bulwark against a kind of solipsism into which the very process of making art threatened to thrust him.

1:30 pm Lecture/Panel Discussion
The Shale Dilemma: A Global Perspective on Fracking and Shale Development
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation and Center for Industry Studies
See Details

Book launch and panel discussion. To register, visit https://shale_book_launch.eventbrite.com.

Panelists:
Shanti Gamper-Rabindran, University of Pittsburgh, GSPIA

Reid Frazier
Allegheny Front, StateImpact Pennsylvania, Trump on Earth podcast

Amy Sisk
StateImpact Pennsylvania, 90.5 FM WESA

Book details:
President Trump has forged ahead with the America-First Energy Policy, expanding oil and gas extraction while slashing health and environmental regulations. Other countries e.g. Germany and France eschewed shale altogether. Why do countries make such different energy choices? How can we move forward in balancing the benefits and costs from shale? Join a discussion with Shanti Gamper-Rabindran, associate professor from the University of Pittsburgh and Reid Frazier and Amy Sisk, journalists from StateImpact Pennsylvania. We examine shale issues from across the globe and to our local communities that are hosting shale wells, pipelines, disposal wells, and cracker plants.

Thursday, March 22 until Sunday, April 8

(All day) Festival
2018 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Humanities Center at Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

The mission of the Carnegie Mellon International “Faces” Film Festival is to engage the Pittsburgh community with all-encompassing programming that promotes cultural exchange and expression, and through film, illuminates the local and global ethnic communities which seldom have opportunities to celebrate their artwork and culture on a large public scale. By collaborating with guest filmmakers, arts organizations, and local businesses, the festival creates a platform for these ethnic groups to expose the Pittsburgh community to their cultures, allows attendees to identify and relate to their own origins, and for cinematic artists to engage audiences with their films and dialogues.

Thursday, March 22

12:00 pm Lecture
History Of The Present: New Populism And The Case Of Poland
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center
See Details

Join Tomasz Sawczuk for a discussion of the Polish version of a contemporary illiberal and populist politics. Mr. Sawczuk will present the historical background that has led to the current populist and illiberal developments in Polish politics and remark on the strategic situation of the liberal opposition, with thoughts on both how best to and how best not to respond to the populist agenda and contemporary illiberalism.

Tomasz Sawczuk is a political writer and an editor at the Polish sociopolitical weekly magazine "Kultura Liberalna". A law and philosophy graduate at the University of Warsaw in Poland, he is working there on a doctoral dissertation in philosophy devoted to the pragmatist liberalism of Richard Rorty. Thanks to a grant from The Kościuszko Foundation, he is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Pittsburgh (Department of Philosophy). Subsequently, he will be a visiting scholar at the Indiana University (Department of Political Science). He is the author of an upcoming book on contemporary Polish politics, "Nowy liberalizm. Jak zrozumieć i wykorzystać kryzys III RP" ("New Liberalism. How To Understand And Respond To The Crisis Of The Third Republic Of Poland").

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa Series: Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Success
Location:
Room 4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Education in Ethiopia: Challenges Women Face in the Pursuit of Higher Education

Thursday March 22nd, 2018 - 12 – 1:30 pm Room 4130 WWPH

Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Succes
Some women will do anything to get an education. Embark on a journey of stories that will take you into the heart of a rural Ethiopian woman who strives for an education. Stories that will make you laugh, cry, and be thankful for your own educational journey.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
1968: Framing Radical Politics in Time and Space
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Part of the UCIS series exploring the effects of the hallmark year 1968. More Information TBA.

4:30 pm Lecture
France and Culture
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of European Horizons
See Details

Bordeaux Conservatory professor Jean-Louis Agobet will be in Pittsburgh as a part of NAT 28's French Music and Culture Festival. In this talk, he will speak about the relationship between the Conservatories and Universities in France and the politics of culture in the country.

The session will be in English but questions in both French and English are welcome.

Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1924801574516857/

6:00 pm Lecture
Two Evenings at Pitt
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Hillman Library, PittArts and Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures
See Details

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

6:30 pm Film
Film: Autumn Gem (Rae Chang, 2009)
Location:
Mt. Lebanon Library
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Join us on March 22nd at 6:30 pm for a screening of the 2009 Chinese documentary, Autumn Gem at the Mt. Lebanon Library. Qiu Jin (1875-1907) was a radical women’s rights activist who defied tradition to become the leader of a revolutionary army, as she boldly challenged traditional gender roles and demanded equal rights and opportunities for women.The first female martyr for China’s 1911 Revolution, Qiu Jin is celebrated as a national heroine today.

Light refreshments will be served. Special guest commentator TBA.

Friday, March 23 until Saturday, March 24

10:00 am Conference
Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference

For more information about the conference and call for papers, visit: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

Call for papers: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp/call-for-papers

Friday, March 23

11:30 am Lecture
Keynote Speaker
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Dr. Carlos E. Ponce is the director for Latin America programs at Freedom House. Ponce previously worked as the General Coordinator for the Latin American and Caribbean Network for Democracy, and has been a consultant for a variety of organizations focused on strengthening civil society, developing mechanisms to protect human rights defenders, and solidifying democratic institutions in the region.

Ponce is also a member of the Steering Committee of the World Movement for Democracy, the ISC of the Community of Democracies, and is the General Coordinator of the Latin American and Caribbean Network for Democracy. He received a Ph.D in Law and Policy from Northeastern University, and also holds Master’s degree in Environmental Law from Vermont Law School, a Master of Arts degree in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning from Tufts University, a JD from the Andres Bello Catholic University.

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas

11:30 am Colloquium/Lecture Series / Brown Bag
PITT-CMU EUROPEAN COLLOQUIUM
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of German, Department of Anthropology, Department of History and Carnegie-Mellon University Department of History
See Details

Please join us for the second meeting of the European Colloquium. We envision this colloquium as a space of
interdisciplinary conversation, in which graduate students and faculty from both Pitt and CMU will come
together to discuss current research on European topics.

Our presenter will be Heath Cabot, Asst. Professor of Anthropology, the University of Pittsburgh. Comments
will be offered by Paul Eis, History, CMU.

We are looking forward to an exciting discussion about "The European Refugee Crisis and Humanitarian
Citizenship in Greece" Dr. Cabot’s paper is being pre-circulated. Please contact Iris Matijevic, ESC at
irm24@pitt.edu, to have a copy emailed to you in advance of the colloquium.

Organized as a monthly brown bag event, we hope that everyone will bring not only their lunch, but also their
questions and comments to what will hopefully become an ongoing conversation.

Saturday, March 24

(All day) Conference
Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and U.S. Department of Education
See Details

The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to announce its inaugural, regional one-day conference on Saturday, March 24, 2018. The Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference creates a space for the sharing of ideas and broader intellectual engagement for Africanist faculty, researchers, and graduate students from across the Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes regions. Seeing the need for opportunities for scholarly development and networking among educators and researchers in African Studies outside of the annual meeting of the African Studies Association, we invite Africanists from universities, community colleges, HBCUs, and other academic institutions in the neighboring states of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, Indiana, Michigan, and New York to participate in the conference. The larger goal is to stimulate a regional intellectual community for Africanist scholars and researchers across a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds and institutions.

The keynote speaker for the conference will be Dr. Moses Ochonu, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of History in the Department of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of three books (including Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was a finalist for the 2015 Herskovits prize), numerous articles, and is a frequent public commentator on history and politics in Nigeria and the larger African continent. Co-sponsors for this conference also include the Department of Africana Studies, the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and the U.S. Department of Education.

The conference organizers have limited travel funds available to support conference participants who are more than three hours away from the University of Pittsburgh. If you are interested, please contact Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu to request an application for travel funds.

Registration for the conference is free and breakfast and lunch will be provided. The deadline for conference abstracts is March 1, 2018. To present at the conference, please submit an abstract of 150 to 200 words through the online registration form. Participants will be notified of their acceptance within one week of the abstract deadline. A conference website with the full agenda will also be posted before the conference takes place.

You may register and view program information on the website of the University of Pittsburgh African Studies program: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/africa/content/2018-african-studies-conference

Please direct any questions or concerns to Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu.

2:00 pm Film
Serbian Film Festival
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of Serb National Federation
See Details

2:00 PM: THE PROMISE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 74 minutes
Directed By: Zeljko Mirkovic

In a remote village in the southeast of Serbia something unexpected has happened. All of a sudden, a French family has moved to a poor place deserted by the young. They believe they have found a promised land for growing grapes and winemaking. But they have found only old people in the village, distrusting people with old habits. A new challenge awaited them back home in France – how to persuade sommeliers that superior wine can be made in an unknown region? Can they awake hope and breathe a new life into the old village? This marvelous documentary about winemaking in Serbia won nine international awards so far.

3:30 PM: SERBS ON CORFU
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 99 minutes
Author: Sladjana Zaric

A documentary by Radio Television of Serbia describing one of the most tragic events faced by the Serbian people – the exile of the entire nation, army, and government of Serbia to the island Corfu, Greece during World War I. In order to avoid a capitulation of their country to the Austro-Hungary Empire, the Serbian Government and army (including the civilian population) decide to leave their own country and cross Albania during the dead of winter to reach the Allies at the Adriatic Sea. This was a unique case in world history that an entire nation immigrated to save their lives.

6:00 PM: SANTA MARIA della SALUTE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 117 minutes
Directed By: Zdravko Sotra

An enjoyable biographical story about the love between one of the most famous Serbian poets, Laza Kostic, renowned for his sublime poems, and an attractive, educated, charming, and rich young girl, Lenka Dundjerski. Lenka was the daughter of Kostic’s friend, Lazar Dundjerski. She had read Kostic’s poetry before she met him, and he was thirty years older than her. The love affair inspired one of the most beautiful love poems of Serbian and European poetry, Santa Maria della Salute. The movie was one of most popular movies in Serbia in 2016 and 2017.

Sunday, March 25

2:00 pm Lecture
The Battle for Dukla Pass
Location:
1500 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pitt Student Slovak Club; Slovak Studies Program
See Details

A life-long expert on the Battle of Dukla Pass, Bill Tarkulich will discuss the breadth of the revered, crucial, protracted, and bloody chapter in Slovaks’ confrontation with Nazi control toward World War II, including in-tended strategy, unintended political and social results, personalities, local citizenry. He weighs in on the effects the disastrous battle had on the Slovak National Uprising. Mr. Tarkulich has published several papers on Rusyn family history, homeland history, and genealogy research methods for most families in Slovakia. Many of his methods have become de-facto standards for research in Slovakia in general and the Carpathian Mountains and border lands specifically. He graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology and went on to earn a grad-uate degree at Northeastern University.

Refreshments will be served

Monday, March 26

12:00 pm Colloquium
Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Humanities Center
See Details

Yoneyama’s third single-authored book, Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes (Duke University Press, 2016), considered the ongoing efforts to bring justice to the Japanese war crimes, the legacy of U.S. military occupation, and the failure of decolonization in the aftermath of World War II. It deployed a method of conjunctive transpacific critique to illuminate the radical challenges the post-1990s redress culture can potentially bring to the still problematic effects of the Cold War knowledge formations.

Lisa Yoneyama is a Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies & Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. She received Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at Stanford University, California (1993). Prior to joining the University of Toronto, she taught Cultural Studies and U.S.-Japan Studies at University of California, San Diego (1992-2011), where she also served as Director of the Program for Japanese Studies (interim, 2008-09) and Critical Gender Studies Program (2009-2011). Her research interests have always centered on the memory politics concerning war and colonialism, issues related to gender and militarism, and the cultural dimensions of transnationalism, neo-colonialism, and nuclearism, as well as the Cold War and post-Cold War U.S. relations with Asia.

3:00 pm Lecture
Feeling of Freedom: Japanese and American Wartime Films on the Liberation of the Philippines, 1943-45
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

This presentation analyzes Japanese and American filmic representations of the liberation of the Philippines during World War II in the Asia-Pacific. Professor Fujitani argues that while the occupations of both these militarized empires disavowed colonialist and cam in the name of freedom and self-determination for all peoples, they were very similar attempts to establish a new and postcolonial form of empire that depended upon producing the feeling that their empires enabled freedom and equality. They talk further explores how the American and Japanese films mobilized the tropes of choice, death, romance, and race to produce images of their empires as spaces of freedom and equality.

Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific).

Much of his past and current research has centred on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues. He is the author of Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996; Japanese version, NHK Books, 1994; Korean translation, Yeesan Press, 2003) and Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Koreans in WWII (UC Press, 2011; Japanese version forthcoming from Iwanami Shoten); co-editor of Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (Duke U. Press, 2001); and editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).

He has held grants and fellowships from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Stanford Humanities Center, Social Science Research Council, Institute for Research in Humanities at Kyoto U, Humanities Research Institute at UC Irvine, University of California President’s Research Fellowship in the Humanities, American Philosophical Society, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard U, and other institutions.

He has served on numerous editorial and institutional boards including for the International Journal of Korean History, Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review, Japanese Studies, University of California Press, Stanford Humanities Center, SSRC, and Association for Asian Studies. He is currently working on a book that assesses the location of the Japanese monarchy in contemporary Japanese understandings and contestations over the meaning of the nation, gender, race, globalization, and the past.

Tuesday, March 27

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag/Panel Discussion
Conversations on Europe - Elections in Italy: A Next Wave for Populism?
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

In-person or remote participation in this virtual roundtable is possible, and audience questions are encouraged.

For information, contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

3:00 pm Film
Barefoot Doctor Sun Lizhe
Location:
Thornburgh Room, First Floor, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

This documentary film recounts Dr. Sun Lizhe's remarkable experience as a barefoot doctor in rural China and offers a glimpse of China's healthcare condition during and shortly after the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Described as "Chinese Dr. Zhivago" in the film, Sun's distinguished life began from his decision to become a "barefoot doctor" when he was an 18-year-old educated youth from Beijing sent down to the countryside. He had since saved numerous lives by performing difficult surgery when emergency situations arose. For example, he once manually removed a placenta from a peasant women's uterus during her placental dystocia. In villages where medical resources were extremely limited, Sun devoted himself to the healthcare of peasants, performing more than 3000 operations in the cave dwellings of Shaanxi province. In 1974 he was selected by Chairman Mao as one of China's five model "educated youths."

The film directed by Xu Tong will be followed by a Q&A with Dr. Sun Lizhe.

4:00 pm Lecture
Connected Seas: the Baltic Sea in a wider Oceanic World
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History
See Details

Professor North, currently a teaching fellow at UC Santa Barbara, is Chair of Modern History at the Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Director of the Graduate Program “Contact Area Mare Balticum: Foreignness and Integration in the Baltic Region” and Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Training Group “Baltic Borderlands: Shifting Boundaries of Mind and Culture in the Borderlands of the Baltic Sea Region.”

Wednesday, March 28

9:00 am Workshop
Rethinking South-South Cooperation: India and Brazil in the 21st Century
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

The University Center for International Studies (UCIS) at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to host the workshop "Rethinking South-South Cooperation: India and Brazil in the 21st Century" on March 28, 2018. Organized as a partnership between the Center for Latin American Studies and the Asian Studies Center, the workshop links with the successful international conference at Renmin University (China) that focused on the trilateral relationships between China, the United States, and Latin America. The "Rethinking South-South Cooperation" workshop will analyze the growing relationship between India and Brazil from a multidisciplinary perspective. More specifically, we are excited to focus on the issues of governance and population management, with specific sessions dedicated to South-South Governance, Mega-Events and Global Repercussions, Urbanization and Megacities, and Policing and Politics. Using India and Brazil as a model, the workshop hopes to consider how comparative politics along a south-south axis can elicit different concerns and tactics than a more traditional global or north/south, colonial comparative model.

4:00 pm Lecture
Hunger Artists: Zen Cooking, Mindful Eating, and Consumer Culture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Religious Studies Department

Thursday, March 29 until Friday, March 30

10:00 am Symposium
John Beverley International Symposium
Location:
University of Pittsburgh: University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Humanities Center, Cultural Studies, University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Science, Bolivian Studies Journal and and Theatre Arts
See Details

John Beverley: International Symposium
University of Pittsburgh – University Club

In recognition of Professor John Beverley’s retirement next year, the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures is hosting an international symposium titled, "JOHN BEVERLEY AND THE URGENCY OF LATIN AMERICANISM IN TIMES OF CONFLICTING GLOBALIZATION". This international symposium is scheduled for March 29-30, 2018, at the University of Pittsburgh – University Club.
http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/news-story/john-beverley-international-symp...

Thursday, March 29

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Poems, Politics and Litigation againts the U.S. Government
Location:
Barco Law Building, Room 113
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University of Pittsburgh Law School and Center for International Legal Education
See Details

Margaret Randall is a poet, essayist, oral historian, translator, photographer, and social activist. She lived in Latin America for 23 years (in Mexico, Cuba and Nicaragua).

She has published more than 100 books of poetry, prose, and oral history, including numerous books on Cuban, Nicaraguan, and Vietnamese women, and recently Che on My Mind, a feminist reflection on the life and legacy of Che Guevara. Randall has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors for her writings.

In 1984, Randall returned to the United States, but faced deportation under the McCarran Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 based on her writings, which the U.S. Government declared were, “against the good order and happiness of the United States.” After a five year legal battle, she won her case.

Randall will read her poetry and discuss her successful legal battle against deportation with University of Pittsburgh School of Law Professor, Jules Lobel, who participated in her legal fight.

Sponsored by: Center for Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh; Center for International Legal Education, University of Pittsburgh Law School; University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

2:00 pm Lecture
European Climate Politics and Activism from Local to Global
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

European climate and energy policies have been leading the world for several years, and climate activism has long been visible in many European cities and campuses. So what’s new in EU climate policy and activism? What’s next for EU climate politics in the age of the Trump Administration’s global gaslighting?

Funded through the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
Book Launch for Zouping Revisited
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of Political Science and Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
See Details

China has undergone dramatic change in its economic institutions in recent years, but surprisingly little change politically. Somehow, the political institutions seem capable of governing a vastly more complex market economy and a rapidly changing labor force. One possible explanation, examined in Zouping Revisited, is that within the old organizational molds there have been subtle but profound changes to the ways these governing bodies actually work. The authors take as a case study the local government of Zouping County and find that it has been able to evolve significantly through ad hoc bureaucratic adaptations and accommodations that drastically change the operation of government institutions.
Zouping has long served as a window into local-level Chinese politics, economy, and culture. In this volume, top scholars analyze the most important changes in the county over the last two decades. The picture that emerges is one of institutional agility and creativity as a new form of resilience within an authoritarian regime.

6:00 pm Lecture
A City of Consumption: The Woodblock Print Industry in Edo, Japan
Location:
Theater, Carnegie Museum of Art
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Mitsubishi Electric Power Products and The Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania
See Details

Dr. Brenda Jordan will detail the process for making ukiyo-e wood block prints and the publishing industry that gave rise to these works of art that were accessible to the public. After the lecture, the Hiroshima exhibit will be open to the attendees. This event will serve as a kickoff event for the Hiroshima exhibit, which will be open from March 24 to July 8. Join the Japan America Society of Pennsylvania for this free evening. Space is limited so please register today — japansocietypa.org/events.

Dr. Jordan is the Director of the University of Pittsburgh National Coordinating Site for the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) and the Japan Studies Coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh Asian Studies Center. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Kansas specializing in 19th Century Japanese art history.

Friday, March 30

3:00 pm Lecture
Soldiers and Kings
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Studies Center
See Details

Jason de Leon has been involved in an analog photoethnographic project focused on documenting the daily lives of Honduran smugglers who profit from transporting undocumented migrants across Mexico. He will discuss the relationship between transnational gangs and the human smuggling industry and will outline the complicated role that photography plays as a field method and data source in this violent and challenging ethnographic context.

5:00 pm Film
A Violent Prosecutor
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and and the Film Studies Program
See Details

A Violent Prosecutor (2016) is directed by Lee Il-hyung. A recent addition to the surge of political dramas in Korean cinema today, this film follows an unyielding prosecutor who, framed and convicted for murder, teams up with a con artist to catch the real murderer from behind bars.

Pizza and refreshments provided.