Events in UCIS

Thursday, April 12 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Friday, April 13

(All day) Symposium
European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Location:
527, 538, and 548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

9:45 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Keota Fields [UMass, Dartmouth], “Implicit Biases as Perceptual Skills: Is Anyone to Blame?”
Dr. Katherine Tullmann [Grand Valley State University], “Implicit Bias and Racialized Seeing: Development, Harm, and Moral Responsibility”

11:30 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Dan Flory [Montana State University], “Three Kinds of Racialized Disgust in Film”
Dr. Janine Jones [UNC Greensboro], “Perceiving Anti-Black Space: Where’s the Glitch?”

1:45 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Lacey Davidson [PhD candidate, Purdue University] & Dr. Daniel Kelly [Purdue], “Minding the Gap: Individual Biases, Soft Structures, and the Psychology of Social Norms”
Dr. Terrance MacMullan [Eastern Washington University], “The American Redoubt and the Coyolxauqui Imperative”

3:00 pm Lecture
The Unknown Patient: Medicine, Mystery & the City
Location:
3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology
See Details

What does it mean to solve a city through bodies? This paper draws from ongoing ethnographic research in a municipal public hospital trauma ward in Mumbai. The talk centers on a key figure in this context, the “Unknown” patient — this is the term for a patient who arrives to the ward without clear identity. Unknown patients underscore the challenge of trying to survive without kin. As mysteries of personhood get worked out alongside resuscitation, surgery, and intensive care, the ward's ethics and actions cut through different genres of sociality, including state bureaucracy, hospital emergency drama, detective mystery, and pulp crime. Problems of the city become problems for medicine and law to solve together. Knowing and feeling noir urbanism meshes with knowing and feeling bodily injury and repair. Ultimately, this raises broader questions about how to understand bodies and cities in tandem.

5:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.