Events in UCIS

Monday, October 16 until Friday, October 20

(All day) Exhibit
Study Abroad Photo Contest
Location:
Kimbo Arts Gallery
Sponsored by:
International Week and Study Abroad Office
See Details

From 300+ photos submitted by students who have recently studied abroad, 30 amazing shots in six categories have been selected for display in the Kimbo Art Gallery.

Come and vote for your favorite image!

(All day) Cultural Event
International Cuisine at Market Central
Location:
Market Central Cafeteria
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Join us each day during International Week for a celebration of international cuisine at Market Central cafeteria.

(All day) Information Session
Study Abroad and International Certificates Information Sessions for Freshman Studies Classes
Location:
837 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Each year during International Week, all Freshman Studies Program classes are invited to attend a 1-hour orientation to the many study abroad, certificate, and scholarship options available through the University Center for International Studies.

Monday, October 16 until Saturday, October 21

(All day) Cultural Event
International Week Service Project
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

We will be collecting Panther Funds for the South Hills Interfaith Movement (SHIM). SHIM provides a variety of supplies to refugees in the greater Pittsburgh area. These funds will be collected all week in the Kimbo Gallery of the William Pitt Union, at the Food Trucks event, and at the weekly Thursday Farmer's Market outside the Union.

Friday, October 20 until Saturday, October 21

8:00 am Conference
(des)articulaciones 2017--6th Graduate Student Conference
Location:
CL, University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Office of the Provost, John Beverley, and the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Organization, Dean for Graduate Research and the Humanities Center and Cultural Studies
See Details

http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/graduate/international-grad-student-conference

(des)articulaciones 2017: (De)conceptualizations: Beyond Identity, Coloniality and the Subaltern

Date: October 20-21, 2017

Keynote Speakers: Lurgio Gavilán and Nelson Maldonado-Torres

Frederic Jameson proposed that third world texts should be read as national allegories, considering that politics and libidinal dynamics are equally involved in mapping out the whole. Behind this view lies the idea that these texts only function as displays of a collective reality by way of an individual and subjective reality. In addition, this notion reinforces the fact that national allegories are based on the idea of identity as a fixed and hereditary entity which does not change with time, when in reality, identities are cultural constructs which we define in our relations with others, i.e., fluid constructions which are ever changing and in progress. Identity interpreted contrary to a universalist and essentialist view, as Stuart Hall affirms, is a “structured representation which only achieves its positive through the narrow eye of the negative. It has to go through the eye of the needle of the other before it can construct itself.” Therefore, the matter here, following Levinas, is one of accepting alterity as a constitutive part of the subject while, on the other hand, not falling into a stereotyped vision of reality. Achille Mbembe says that, “in Foucault’s terms, racism is above all a technology aimed at permitting the exercise of biopower, that old sovereign right of death.” In other words, the form of looking at the other is defined by a peculiarity and legitimacy that stems from violence and murder.

We propose to think about theory from various angles, which take into account crises of national allegory, failures of identity and thinking about Latin America as a homogenous block. By revising the core ideas proposed, we allow ourselves to reflect on the extent to which the production of knowledge can be realized inside, and outside of, the theoretical, political and social debate. To this end, we call for interdisciplinary approaches that, by means of alternative theories and/or empirical practices, try to place themselves outside of the established theoretical frameworks in order to enrich them with new reflections and hypotheses. Concepts of identities, coloniality, and the subaltern, amongst others, are standard in the Academy. Thus, our proposal is not only to rethink them, but also to furnish them with new meaning or unveil their methodological gaps.

Abstracts can focus on the following topics (although other related topics are welcome):

The transformation of local, national and international identities (transpacific and transatlantic studies)
The recent political developments and their effect on the perceptions of the Other and the sense of self-identity
Questions of race, discrimination and racism in the global stage
“Frontier” literature and related works
Latino writers in the United States of America
Indigenismo and political struggles
Theories of decolonization, the establishment of identity labels and the process of identity formation itself
Dictatorship, dirty war, forced disappearance and necropolitics
Ayahuasca tourism and its emerging market
Borders, drug trafficking and identity
Popular music and identities

Friday, October 20

11:00 am Career Counselling
Global Company Tour
Location:
5th Floor - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Interested in having a global career? Are you wanting to either work abroad or work for a global company in the States? Then this is the opportunity for you! There will be five, 20-minute “meet and greets” with employers in designated rooms on the 5th floor of the William Pitt Union with the opportunity to rotate in and out of different ones to get the most information and advice possible in regard to launching your global career. Additionally, we will have a ‘networking room’ with alumni and other organizations/employers to get more one-on-one time to discuss possibilities and interest. This event is open to all international and domestic students. Career Passports will be distributed to students to get ‘stamped’ and raffled off to win exciting prizes!

This is a part of the Global Career Week during Pitt's International Week!

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
internships in Africa
Location:
4217
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
See Details

This event features practitioners in the field both in the United States and Africa

Victoria Nalongo, Bright Kids, Uganda
Hanifa Nakiryowa, Center for Rehabilitation of Survivors of Acid and Burns Violence (CERESAV), Uganda
Jenny Roach & Margaret Wambui, Hekima Place, Kenya
Justin Forzano, Founder & CEO, Cameroon FDP

Date: October 20, 2017
Venue: 4217 WWPH
Time: 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

This roundtable discussion forum will be an opportunity for students to learn about community-based development organizations in Cameroon, Kenya & Uganda. The round-table discussants will talk about the various roles of their organizations as service providers and change agents. Students will learn and find out ways they can participate through internship or volunteer opportunities. The guests will be happy to answer any questions from the audience and share personal stories

12:00 pm Colloquium
The Magic of K-Pop
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
See Details

The rise of Korean music (K-Pop) around the world in the last two decades has been a mystery to many industry experts. Some compares it to the explosion of British rock and roll in 1960s (“The British Invasion”), calling it “The Korean Wave (Han-Ryu)”. Even though it is not a part of the main stream music worldwide, it definitely deserves our attention as a cultural sensation. What is the magic ingredient of K-Pop for its worldwide popularity? How has a tiny country such as South Korea become a major exporter of a cultural product? We will first discuss the history of the rise of K-Pop and try to identify the answers to these questions. Our focus will be on K-Pop as a cultural product and examine the market forces including the consumers who adopted K-Pop as their music of choice.

3:00 pm Lecture
The Dynamics of the Interrelationship Between Language and Thought in Processing Motion: What Eye Movements Can Show Us
Location:
Cathedral of Learning G13
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Linguistics
See Details

Does the language that we speak influence the way we think, perceive reality or remember certain aspects of it? The so-called "linguistic relativity" debate has been recently reinvigorated by a new generation of technology-assisted cross-linguistic and bilingual studies suggesting that both linguistic and non-linguistic cognitive behavior (attention, memory, etc.) are influenced by our native and additional languages. In her talk, Dr. Victoria Hasko analyzes the domain of motion to investigate the differences in how native speakers of English and Russian talk about motion and space and how they interrogate motion events visually and verbally. Her work is motivated by the evidence of significant acquisitional difficulties in the ability of English-speaking American learners of Russian to verbalize motion events in Russian in a native-like manner, suggesting resistance to to cognitive restructuring.

3:00 pm Career Counselling
Study Abroad Re-Entry and Career Integration Workshop
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

This workshop is for students who have studied abroad and have now returned. In collaboration with the study abroad office and CDPA, rotation stations with table topics will feature how to market your skills learned from your international experience, your elevator pitch, resume reviews, fun activities, resources and much more!

This workshop will be a part of Global Careers Week during Pitt's International Week!

5:00 pm Reception
Opening Reception for Displacement(s) Film Series
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Cloisters
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Week
See Details

Please join the International Week Committee and University Center for International Studies for the opening reception of the Displacement(s) film series. Refreshments will be provided prior to the first films in the series beginning at 6pm.

6:00 pm Film
Menstrual Practices and Displacement in Far-West Nepal: A Series of Short, Collaborative Documentary Films Highlighting Menstrual Practices (80 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Global Health Student Association
See Details

Menstrual Practices and Displacement in Far-West Nepal: A Series of Short, Collaborative Documentary Films Highlighting Menstrual Practices (60 minutes)
Menstruation is a monthly, natural, biological process for healthy girls and women 1. The onset of menstruation often signals girls into womanhood 2, and is a fundamental factor of human reproduction 1. Though this natural phenomenon is a sign of good health, and celebrates women’s ability to reproduce, it often comes with challenges for billions of women and girls around the globe 3. In Nepal, a country with over 28.5 million people 4 and 125 caste/ethnic groups 5, menstrual practices can be particularly hazardous 6. In the far-western region of the country, many women practice a century-old Hindu tradition called chhaupadi that views menstruating women as impure and displaces them from their homes to a small shed during their period and after childbirth 6,7. Women have experienced incidents of violence, snakebites, rape and even death while practicing chhaupadi 6,7. Though Nepal’s supreme court banned chhaupadi in 2005 7,8, evidence reveals that it is still widely practiced in the mid and far-western parts of the country 6,9. This film project aimed to develop a deeper, visual understanding of menstrual practices in Far-West Nepal. The research team equipped seven girls with cameras to film their menstrual practices, and engaged participants as community-based researchers. The films revealed that there are in fact a variety of practices, and a range of beliefs regarding menstruation in the community; and using collaborative film-making allowed the team to uncover important nuances. The films were filmed and directed by the seven girls themselves.
Trailer: https://vimeo.com/230438677

Discussion with Filmmaker Sara Liza Baumann (20 minutes)

7:30 pm Film
Mare Nostrum (14 minutes) & On the Bride’s Side (89 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and International Week along with CMU IFF
See Details

Mare Nostrum (14 minutes)
On the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, a Syrian Father makes a decision that puts his daughter's life at risk.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ybh4czwN6YE

On the Bride’s Side (89 minutes)
A Palestinian poet and an Italian journalist meet five Palestinians and Syrians in Milan who entered Europe via the Italian island of Lampedusa after fleeing the war in Syria. They decide to help them complete their journey to Sweden – and hopefully avoid getting themselves arrested as traffickers – by faking a wedding. With a Palestinian friend dressed up as the bride and a dozen or so Italian and Syrian friends as wedding guests, they cross halfway over Europe on a four-day journey of three thousand kilometers.
Trailer: http://www.iostoconlasposa.com/en/#trailer

Discussion with Pitt Professor Heath Cabot