Week of October 8, 2017 in UCIS

Monday, October 9

12:30 pm Lecture
Environment and Space in Colonial Afro-Latin America
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with History Department and Department of Africana Studies
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Environment and space are constitutive of human experience. This paper explores how Afro-Latin Americans established important cultural relationships with their environments and transformed abstract spaces into meaningful places in ways that profoundly influenced other dimensions of their lives, and those around them. It argues, first, that African perceptions of Neotropical nature were anchored within beliefs and practices that people brought with them from Africa. Second, it examines the importance of subsistence agriculture and the Columbian Exchange within the larger context of violent social disruption and forced migration. A final section considers the politics and historical geography of land and cultural rights in Afro-Latin America today.

Tuesday, October 10

12:00 pm Workshop
When is “Forced Marriage” a Form of Modern Slavery?
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
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When is – and isn’t— forced marriage a form of modern slavery? To answer this controversial question, this Workshop explores the range of types of forced marriages – from customary forced marriages, to mail-order-brides, and abducted “wives” of armed fighters – in relation to competing legal definitions and conceptual debates about slavery. Participants will work toward a comprehensive understanding and definition of conjugal slavery which addresses the intersection between slavery and the broader issue of forced marriage, compare the suitability of rights-based slavery laws and prosecution-based trafficking laws in cases of conjugal slavery, gain insights into the working of slavery, human rights and trafficking laws more generally, and engage in current debates about modern slavery and about different approaches to ending it.

This workshop is limited to graduate students. Registration required. Please email Diane Cohen (drc51@pitt.edu). Light refreshments will be served.

1:00 pm Lecture
The Road to Sleeping Dragon: Learning China from the Ground Up
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and Department of English
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In 1995, at the age of twenty-three, Michael Meyer joined the Peace Corps and, after rejecting offers to go to seven other countries, was sent to a tiny town in Sichuan. Knowing nothing about China, or even how to use chopsticks, Meyer wrote Chinese words up and down his arms so he could hold conversations, and, per a Communist dean’s orders, jumped into teaching his students about the Enlightenment, the stock market, and Beatles lyrics. Soon he realized his Chinese counterparts were just as bewildered by the country’s changes as he was. With humor and insight, Meyer puts readers in his novice shoes, winding across the length and breadth of his adopted country -- from a terrifying bus attack on arrival, to remote Xinjiang and Tibet, and his future wife's Manchurian family, and into efforts to protect China's heritage at places like "Sleeping Dragon," the world's largest panda preserve.

In the last book of his China trilogy, Meyer tells a story both deeply personal and universal, as he gains greater – if never complete – assurance, capturing what it feels like to learn a language, culture and history from the ground up. Meyer will recount his 20-year journey via photographs, as well as talking about the challenges of reporting from China and how a freelance writer can fund and produce books that reach a wide audience.

5:30 pm Film
KHOON DIY BAARAV
Location:
407 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with IndoPacific Council, Asian Studies Center, Film Studies, Cultural Studies and Department of English
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Khoon Diy Baarav enters the vexed political scenario in Kashmir through the lives of families of the victims of enforced disappearances. The film is a non-sequential account of personal narratives and reminiscences ruptured by violence, undermined by erasure, and over-ridden by official documents that challenge truth. Made over nine years it explores memory as a mode of resistance, constantly confronting and morphing- from the personal to political, individual to collective. It looks at the ways in which those affected by violence have no choice but to remember.

Wednesday, October 11

1:00 pm Information Session
Summer Study Abroad Scholarship Information Session
Location:
CL 501
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Information session outline requirements and logistics of Nationality Rooms and Intercultural Exchange Programs Summer Study Abroad Scholarships.

3:00 pm Lecture
Culture and Security
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center; Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies; Ford Institute for Human Security and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe
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Security studies have given surprisingly little attention to cultural diversity as a constituent factor in the overall dynamics of security management. A case in point is that securitization theory still refers to cultural differences mainly as a source for conflict and therefore as an object of securitization. So far, cultural codes, linguistic barriers, and processes of self-identification did not constitute an important aspect of analysis. Culture as a value based concept and as a group marker, however, is not per se a primary source of conflict. Rather, culture appears as a symbol over and through which security concerns are articulated. Therefore, in multi-cultural societies cultural affiliation plays a crucial role in pre-structuring audiences and security agendas.

Addressing this emerging field of interdisciplinary security studies, this lecture is a lead-up to a day-long Graduate Student Workshop on Thursday, October 12. While the workshop is especially intended to Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science, all are welcome. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs by September 29.

Since 2007, Peter Haslinger has been the Director of the Herder Institut for Historical Research on East-Central Europe in Marburg, Professor of East-Central European History at the Historical Institute of the Justus Liebig University and the Interdisciplinary Center for Eastern Europe in Gießen (GiZo). His research and teaching focuses on forced migrations and expulsions; the minority question; nationalism, regionalism, language policies; memory, museification, and the politics of history; security and violence studies; the spatial turn and the history of cartography; and the history of discourse and scientific communication. For a list of publications and awards, see https://www.herder-institut.de/en/institute-staff/staff/personen/ansehen....

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Thursday, October 12

2:00 pm Workshop
Graduate Student Workshop in Security Studies
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center; Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies; Ford Institute for Human Security, Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe and Germany
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This Graduate Student Workshop follows on the previous day's lecture on Culture and Security. Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science researching security issues are especially welcome. Participants will explore the emerging interdisciplinary field of culture and security studies through a set of readings distributed in advance and will discuss research projects. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs.

4:00 pm Career Counselling
Study Abroad Re-Entry and Career Integration Workshop
Sponsored by:
International Week and Study Abroad Office
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This workshop is for students who have studied abroad and have now returned. In collaboration with the study abroad office and CDPA, rotation stations with table topics will feature how to market your skills learned from your international experience, your elevator pitch, resume reviews, fun activities, resources and much more!

This workshop will be a part of Global Careers Week during Pitt's International Week!

Friday, October 13

(All day) Symposium
Symposium: “Europe’s Muslim Question?”
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
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In this one-day symposium, invited scholars will discuss Europe’s contemporary “Muslim crisis” from a twofold approach: First, how successive public debates and the policies they have enabled have deployed specific languages of liberalism and secularism. Second, how have European Muslims responded to the discursive and conceptual terrain of Europe’s Islam debate and the political environment it creates. Do they defend their presence by employing some of the liberal languages Europe champions as its own or do they seek to employ alternative languages that refuse the discursive framework in which Islam has been placed? And in these different responses, what roles do creative forms of expression, such as cinema, music, or literature play? Faculty organizer: Jeanette Jouili, Department of Religious Studies. Attendance is free and open to the public, though advanced registration is required. Symposium sessions will also be live-streamed.

To register, go to https://escsymposium2018.eventbrite.com.

To view the conference program, visit http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/content/europe-muslim-question .

Sponsored by the European Studies Center with additional thanks to the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
For more information, contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

10:00 am Lecture
The Russian Revolution as Utopian "Leap in the Open Air of History"
Location:
3911 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
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In the days before the centenary of the October Revolution, this lecture revisits the question of “utopianism” in the Russian revolution - conventionally a negative charge of fanciful desire, wishful illusion, or worse - from the perspective of the streets and diverse lives.

Mark Steinberg specializes on the cultural, intellectual, and social history of Russia and the Soviet Union in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His recent and current research focuses on urban history, revolutions, emotions, religion, violence, and utopias. From 2006 to 2013, he was editor of the interdisciplinary journal Slavic Review. He is currently completing the 9th edition of A History of Russia and beginning a new project on “the straight and the crooked” in urban spaces in Leningrad, Odessa, and Shanghai in the 1920s and 1930s. At the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, he recently concluded his term as coordinator of the Department of History’s Center for Historical Interpretation, which focused for three years on the them of on Global Utopias (http://globalutopias.weebly.com).

Mark Steinberg's newest book, The Russian Revolution, 1905-1921 (Oxford University Press, 2017), will be available for purchase and signing after the event.

2:30 pm Information Session
Summer Study Abroad Scholarship Information Session
Location:
CL 304
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Information session outlining the eligibility and logistics of NRIEP Summer Study Abroad Scholarships.

3:00 pm Workshop
Hands-on Ichigenkin Workshop and Shakuhachi workshop
Location:
Bellefield Auditorium, University of Pittsburgh PA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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Experience ichigenkin and shakuhachi as they were originally played for spiritual enlightenment, heard directly under the player's ear.

4:30 pm Workshop
Voices from Japan: Arts in the Aftermath of Tragedy
Location:
Bellefield Auditorium, University of Pittsburgh PA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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Listening to Brown's composition Aki Meguri Kite and looking at Voices from Japan, a collection of tanka poetry written by survivors of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, this workshop examines the power and necessity of the arts in dealing with devastation.

6:30 pm Festival
Homecoming
Location:
Nationality Rooms
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Members of the Nationality Rooms Committees will be in their respective rooms to greet visitors during homecoming. They will be available to provide information about their rooms and discuss membership and events.

8:00 pm Cultural Event
Shakuhachi and Ichigenkin: Discovery in a Single Tone
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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With roots in the principles of Zen Buddhism and in spiritual practice, these traditional Japanese instruments share and underlying aesthetic concept: the discovery of the world that lies within one note, one sound. The program includes traditional music and new compositions by Japanese and American composers.

This program is supported through the Japan Iron and Steel Federation and Mitsubishi endowments at the University of Pittsburgh.

Saturday, October 14

9:30 am Workshop
Handa City Nihon Buyo Workshop
Location:
O’Hara Student Center, 1st floor Dining Room, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
See Details

Join the Asian Studies Center and the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania on Saturday, October 14 from 9:30-11:30 am for a Japanese dance workshop on Nihon Buyo (日本舞踊). Nihon Buyo is a form of dance that grew out of Kabuki theater movements. A presentation, followed by a short performance of Nihon Buyo will be given by dance master Shinojo Nishikawa and her troupe. At the end of the performance, participants will learn a Nihon Buyo based dance-fitness routine (please wear comfortable clothing if you would like to participate).

This workshop is free and open to the public.

(light refreshments will be served at 9:30 and the presentation will begin at 10:00)

This workshop is free and open to the public, however you must register by October 11 by emailing Patrick Hughes at hughespw@pitt.edu to attend this event.

1:00 pm Cultural Event
Tracing Remembrance
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Cloister
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
See Details

The community is invited to participate in an art installation for remembering and honoring those who are gone. No art experience necessary, just come with your heart.