Week of October 15, 2017 in UCIS

Sunday, October 15

10:30 am Cultural Event
Displacement Storytelling & Walking Meditation Circle
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Cloister
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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We will be creating a space for people of different backgrounds to interact and connect. Through sharing and listening, learn about each other’s experiences of family, immigration, displacement, and diversity. Share your stories, and bring offerings and photos for the altar.

3:00 pm Cultural Event
Celtic Culture Afternoon
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
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The Welsh, Irish, and Scottish Nationality Room Committees invite you to enjoy Celtic songs, dance, storytelling, and much more!

The event is free of charge and takes place from 3:00 to 5:00 PM. Light refreshments will be offered.

5:00 pm Festival
Chuseok: Korean Fall Festival
Location:
WPU Ballroom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Korean Student Association and Daehwa Korean Conversation Club
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Join us in celebrating Chuseok Korea's Fall festival. There will be food, games and music!

5:00 pm Cultural Event
Italian Food & Displacement
Location:
538 WPU
Sponsored by:
International Week
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This event aims to demonstrate how Italian displacement has impacted food by comparing popular Italian-American dishes (chicken parm, New York pizza, etc.) to the original Italian versions (melanzane alla parmigiana, pizza Napolitano, etc.) & the cultural reasoning behind this. Free samples offered!

7:00 pm Film
Allegiance Musical
Location:
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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Everyone who attends will be eligible to win raffle prizes such as CDs signed by Mr. Thione and Mr. Tanabe, tickets to An Evening with George Takei, and 1 VIP seat to meet Mr. Takei after his address on Tuesday, October 17.

General Public $20, CMOA Members: $18, Students: $15.

Event Details:

Inspired by true events, Allegiance is the story of the Kimura family, whose lives are upended when they and 120,000 other Japanese-Americans are forced to leave their homes following the events at Pearl Harbor. Sam Kimura seeks to prove his patriotism by fighting for his country in the war, but his sister, Kei, fiercely protests the government’s treatment of her people. An uplifting testament to the power of the human spirit, Allegiance follows the Kimuras as they fight between duty and defiance, custom and change, family bonds and forbidden loves. Legendary performer George Takei ("Star Trek," “Heroes”), who was himself an internee as a child, stars alongside Tony® winner Lea Salonga (Miss Saigon, Mulan) in this enthralling and epic new musical.

Lorenzo Thione, lead producer of Allegiance, as well as one of the cast members, Sam Tanabe, will join us for the screening. Mr. Thione is an experienced entrepreneur, a product and marketing expert, and is the co-founder and Chief Executive of The Social Edge, an innovative media & digital marketing company that spearheaded the marketing and social media reach for both George Takei’s brand and Allegiance. Mr. Tanabe is an actor, dancer, and performer who has starred in Red Eye for Love in New York and has appeared on CBS’s "The Good Wife." He is a graduate of Point Park University, so he will be rejoining us to celebrate both the Allegiance musical and The University of Pittsburgh’s International Week festivities.

The University of Pittsburgh’s International Week celebration runs from October 15-21. The theme for the 2017 International Week is displacement, and as such, we have invited Mr. George Takei to discuss his experiences as internally displaced person as well as his career since his internment during World War II. And don't miss an Evening with George Takei on Tuesday, October 17 at 7:00pm at Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall. Tickets and International Week sponsorship opportunities are available by visiting the International Week website: www.IWeek.pitt.edu.

Monday, October 16 until Friday, October 20

(All day) Exhibit
Study Abroad Photo Contest
Location:
Kimbo Arts Gallery
Sponsored by:
International Week and Study Abroad Office
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From 300+ photos submitted by students who have recently studied abroad, 30 amazing shots in six categories have been selected for display in the Kimbo Art Gallery.

Come and vote for your favorite image!

(All day) Cultural Event
International Cuisine at Market Central
Location:
Market Central Cafeteria
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Join us each day during International Week for a celebration of international cuisine at Market Central cafeteria.

(All day) Information Session
Study Abroad and International Certificates Information Sessions for Freshman Studies Classes
Location:
837 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Each year during International Week, all Freshman Studies Program classes are invited to attend a 1-hour orientation to the many study abroad, certificate, and scholarship options available through the University Center for International Studies.

Monday, October 16 until Saturday, October 21

(All day) Cultural Event
International Week Service Project
Sponsored by:
International Week
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We will be collecting Panther Funds for the South Hills Interfaith Movement (SHIM). SHIM provides a variety of supplies to refugees in the greater Pittsburgh area. These funds will be collected all week in the Kimbo Gallery of the William Pitt Union, at the Food Trucks event, and at the weekly Thursday Farmer's Market outside the Union.

Monday, October 16

11:00 am Presentation
World History Center Open House
Location:
3900 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Please join us as we open our newly renovated space, introduce the new Center leadership, and talk about the year's plans. Light refreshments will be served.

1:30 pm Workshop
Kick-Start Your Global Career with Passport Career
Location:
224 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Interested in having an international career? Want to learn about living and working abroad or H1B employers? Come learn about this great resource on Passport Career and learn strategies and information on launching a great [global] career! This information session is open to all Pitt students, domestic and international. Snacks provided.

*This information session is part of Global Career Week during Pitt's International Week!

2:00 pm Lecture
Hope Without Future: Hong Kong Young People and Stories of Present Livability
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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Yuen Long, New Territories, Hong Kong is a part of the ecologically vital, heavily populated, and hyper-urbanizing Pearl River delta region. As in many parts of the world, the people there, and the environment in which they live, are caught up in a mix of rapid development projects, cumulative environmental disasters, fraught population movements, and diverse forms of social-ecological dis-placement. Drawing from a number of years of ethnographic research in the region, this talk will trace some of the uneven impacts this entails through a discussion of how young people in Yuen Long are experiencing, navigating, and surviving these changing conditions, and how in turn they are responding. While these responses include nativism and democracy activism, as widely reported in local and international media, they also include what I call ordinary-fantastic stories of present livability. Articulating diverse imaginations of community and mutualistic belonging, these stories are both situated within the specific muddle of realities in the New Territories and are entangled in broader questions of accelerating dis-placements and diminishing life ecologies. I conclude with a discussion of what these stories have to tell us about emergent livabilities for young people in Hong Kong, or the worldings of ordinary imaginings that are fantastic and unlikely urges towards flourishing life.

Speaker: Dr. Kevin Ming. Research Director, Project Share Hong Kong; Researcher, Liberty Asia; Center Associate, Asian Studies, Research Associate, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh

3:00 pm Reception
Linguistics Open House
Location:
G17 (Robert Henderson Language Media Center) Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
International Week
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The Department of Linguistics has been engaged in promoting language learning and language research since 1964. Join us now to celebrate the grand re-opening of our newly refurbished Robert Henderson Language Media Center and the Department of Linguistics Research Lab. The LMC’s PC and MAC labs support the more than 36 languages taught at Pitt—come and explore our technology and learn more about how the labs can help your students learn languages. Meet student researchers in the Linguistics Department who are conducting research on language variation, language learning, and bilingualism, and see presentations on how they are using eye tracking and other experimental methods to study language comprehension and production.

Event is from 3-5 PM. Welcome by Shelome Gooden (chair) at 3:30pm.

Event web page: http://www.polyglot.pitt.edu/events/linguistics-open-house.html
Part of International Week at Pitt. Light refreshments served.

5:00 pm Cultural Event
Speedfriending Event
Location:
Kurtzman Room - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Monday, October 16, 2017
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Kurtzman Room - William Pitt Union

Whether you’re an international student looking to make American friends in Pittsburgh or a native speaker of English interested in meeting people from different cultures, this FREE event is perfect for you! If you’ve ever heard of “Speed Dating,” this is similar. The only difference is that the objective here is to make friends. There will be structured time for short conversations, as well as time for mingling and to enjoy refreshments. Join us for an evening of lively conversation, celebrating diversity, the start of new friendships… and the chance to win a FREE study abroad scholarship and other prizes!

Advance registration is required: http://tinyurl.com/Speedfriending-Fall2017

For more information, contact rom17@pitt.edu.

View and share this event on Facebook!

5:00 pm Panel Discussion
International Fellowships, Scholarships, and Grants Panel
Location:
548 WPU
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Hear from a dynamic panel of students about their enriching educational opportunities, both domestically and abroad, with the support of fellowships, scholarships, and grants! In collaboration with CDPA and the National Scholarships Office, this program will feature diverse opportunities for students from research, foreign language study, and global opportunities [and many more!!] all while building up tremendous skills and experiences. Snacks and refreshments provided!

7:00 pm Performance
Brain Candy Podcast
Location:
Assembly Room - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Performance: FREE and open to the public

Monday, October 16, 2017
7:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Assembly Room - William Pitt Union
A Sugar Rush for your intellectual side, the ladies from Brain Candy Podcast, Susie Meister and Sarah Rice muse about their experiences with reality television, travel abroad, and everything in-between. Though perhaps best known for her reality TV show stardom, Pitt alum Susie Meister is well-versed in the global and social issues surrounding displacement. She has felt this first hand while participating on the MTV television show Road Rules, where she spent months outside of her normal life and confined to adventures with strangers a Winnebago. She completed her PhD in Religious Studies at Pitt in 2014, and now works as a diversity trainer and activist against prejudice. She brings that expertise to her podcast with fellow reality star Sarah Rice from MTV’s The Real World: Brooklyn, as they explore themes ranging from global travel to social media and everything in between.

Pitt students who attend will have the chance to win a FREE study abroad scholarship!

For more information, contact rom17@pitt.edu

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Awakening the Dragon and Lions Ceremony
Location:
WPU Driveway
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week along with OCA Pittsburgh - Asian Pacific American Advocates
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Please join OCA Pittsburgh in the traditional ceremony to awaken the spirits of their new dragon and lions. Chinese dragons traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, typhoons, and floods. The dragon is also a symbol of power, strength, and good blessing to people. In ancient China, the Dotting Dragon Eyes ceremony was traditionally done by the emperor. By using the red pigment on a brush to dot on the eyes, the dragon is “awakened." It also gives the dragon a brighter path and power, and an ability to bless people surrounding it.

In modern times, the honoree of this ceremony is often done by the highest local authority or dignitary. For the International Week ceremony, we have invited Vice Provost of Global Affairs Dr. Ariel Armony to dot the eyes of the dragons and lions to awaken their spirits.

Tuesday, October 17

9:00 am Workshop
Intercultural Competency Workshop
Location:
Craig Hall
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Intercultural Competency: Beyond the Basics (Pitt faculty and staff) - Working and providing services in a diverse environment requires a knowledge and understanding of cultural differences, values, and behaviors. This fun, yet informative, session will help participants gain understanding to enhance the quality of their interactions with international and diverse students, faculty, and staff at the University and elsewhere. Please register through the FSDP website here - http://www.hr.pitt.edu/training/faculty-st/internatio

11:00 am Exhibit
International Fair for Business Students
Location:
College of Business Administration - 2nd Floor - Sennott Square
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

The College of Business Administration's International Programs Office will host an International Fair in the College of Business Administration to promote study abroad and other international opportunities to business students, and encourage study abroad alumni, faculty, and staff to get involved.

11:00 am Workshop
Global Drop-In Hours
Location:
2nd Floor - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

First-come, first serve 20-minute appointments with the designated career consultant for global careers. These drop-in hours are for students who want to learn how to live and work abroad, learn about gap year programs, find H1B employers [for international students], resources and more!

12:00 pm Cultural Event
You Say Potato…
Location:
Assembly Room - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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The potato has been a staple of South American cuisine since the time of the Incan Empire, but the story of its migration around the world is one of not just displacement, but conquest, exploitation, famine, intrigue, defamation, delicious dishes, and semantic confusion! Follow the path of the potato through history and learn about its impact on global cuisine, language, and culture.

1:00 pm Performance
Music Performance of Julius Eastman’s Works
Location:
Bellefield Hall
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Performing Julius Eastman's (1940-1990) works for three pianos Gay Guerilla (1980). Displacement, race, and visibility distinguish Eastman's life and work. To be performed by Ph.D. music composition and theory candidates Jason Belcher, Luhan Li, and Jeff Weston.

2:30 pm Panel Discussion
International Internship and Study Abroad Panel
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Are you interested in studying or interning abroad? Are you in or thinking about joining the OCC? Then you'll want to attend this informative session that'll feature OCC Pitt Advantage Grant recipients who've been all over the world this past summer!! Snacks and refreshments provided.

*This program is part of CDPA's Global Careers Week in conjunction with Pitt's International Week*

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
Peace Corps Education Volunteer Panel
Location:
4131 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Come here Returned Peace Corps volunteers talk about their work as Education Volunteers. Hear their stories about the challenging, rewarding, and inspirational moments from service.

7:00 pm Lecture
An Evening with George Takei
Location:
Soldiers and Sailors Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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The keynote speaker for this year’s International Week, George Takei, was interred in a Japanese internment camp during World War II. This experience became a touchstone for his life and work. Takei rose to preeminence in the television series Star Trek and its first six feature films. However, that only scratches the surface of his storied career as an actor, author, and social media pioneer. Come hear him speak about his experience as an internally displace person during World War II, his life as an actor, and the work for which he is now arguably best known, his social media presence.

Buy Tickets Here

8:00 pm Festival
Non-Alcoholic Mix Off (NAMO)
Location:
Quad
Sponsored by:
International Week
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NAMO occurs in the Schenley Quad on the Tuesday during Alcohol Awareness Week every October. NAMO aims to raise awareness about the effects of alcohol consumption. The Resident Student Association (RSA) executive board, in collaboration with Residence Life and Study Abroad, organizes this event in which all hall councils and RA staffs participate. In addition, RSA invites other registered student organizations to apply to participate in this event. Each group selects a theme, decorates a table, serves a non-alcoholic mixed drink, and provides information about alcohol consumption to participants. Teams receive awards for receiving the most participant votes in the following categories: best drink, worst drink, most spirited, best international drink, and best theme.

8:30 pm Reception
VIP Meet and Greet with George Takei
Location:
Gettysburg Room - Soldiers and Sailors
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Immediately following An Evening with George Takei, Mr. Takei will meet 100 guests. Each guest will receive a signed copy of Mr. Takei's autobiography, To The Stars. Please check back on September 15 to purchase available tickets.

Wednesday, October 18

1:45 am Lecture
Microloans, Transitional Justice, and Reconciliation in Uganda
Location:
RM 3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
See Details

Please join us for an informative presentation:
Microloans, Transitional Justice & Reconciliation in Uganda
By Victoria Nalongo Namusisi
On Wed. Oct. 18 @10:45am in 3911 Posvar Hall

Victoria Nalongo Namusisi has worked for 17 years to mend lives and social relations in Uganda after both political and personal violence.
Recently she has helped the community in Barlonyo in Northern Uganda reestablish itself after the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) ravaged that part of the country. Mentoring, training and providing microloans which are assisting residents to again call this town their home.
Ms. Namusisi also turned to microloans as a means to help survivors of acid attacks. Her involvement in founding the Center for Rehabilitation of Survivors of Acid and Burns Violence (CERESAV) in 2012 led her to encourage independence and confidence in the survivors she came to know. Microloans have successfully enabled new beginnings for these survivors.
Victoria Nalongo Namusisi is the Founder and Director of Bright Kids Uganda, a children’s home founded in 2000. Namusisi worked as a presidential and parliamentary reporter until 1991, when the president of Uganda appointed her Resident District Commissioner. She later became Head of Administration and Logistics for the President of Uganda’s Office. In 2008, she was distinguished as the Woman Achiever of the Year, awarded for her community work with vulnerable children and youth. Today, she continues serving as the director of Bright Kids Uganda.

Victoria Nalongo Namusisi is the Founder and Director of Bright Kids Uganda, a children’s home founded in 2000. Namusisi worked as a presidential and parliamentary reporter until 1991, when the president of Uganda appointed her Resident District Commissioner. She later became Head of Administration and Logistics for the President of Uganda’s Office. In 2008, she was distinguished as the Woman Achiever of the Year, awarded for her community work with vulnerable children and youth. Today, she continues serving as the director of Bright Kids Uganda.

Opportunity: Since 2012, over 20 GSPIA students have traveled to Uganda to serve as interns for a variety of projects at Bright Kids. If you are interested in a 2018 summer internship, please attend the information session on Friday, Oct. 20 at Noon in 4217 Posvar Hall, hosted by African Studies, with free pizza!

10:00 am Panel Discussion
Chutz-POW!: Stories of Survivors in Comics
Location:
918 WPU
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Jewish Studies Program
See Details

In 2013 The Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh launched an initiative to teach the Holocaust in a new way. Form this was bornn Chutz-POW!: Real Superheroes of the Holocaust, a comic book series telling the true life stories of survivors. Since that time two issues of the series have been released, featuring art and writing by Pittsburgh creators. The first issue focused on five survivors who settled in Pittsburgh while issue two told the stories of more internationally well-known figures. A third issue with the theme of Children of the Holocaust is currently in production. This panel will discuss the history of the project, its impact, as well as the artistic and educational goals envisioned.

Participants will include:
Lauren Bairnsfather, Executive Director of the Pittsburgh Holocaust Center.
Zachary Zafris, Editor and Project Manager of issues 1 and 2.
Marcel Walker, Lead Artist, Editor, and Project Manager of issue 3.
Wayne Wise, Comics Scholar and Lead Writer.

11:00 am Cultural Event
International Food Trucks
Location:
William Pitt Union Driveway
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Back by popular demand, the International Week Committee has invited several of the most popular food trucks in the city to share their innovative and delicious cuisines with you. They will be outside of the Union during the lunch hour on Wednesday, October 18, 2017. Cultures from all over the world will be represented by several of the most popular food trucks in the city. Recipes and cuisine are one of the many things that migrant peoples can take with them and can serve as a reminder of that which has been left behind. Students can learn about the problems facing these communities while sampling their innovative and delicious cuisines.

11:00 am Panel Discussion
Displacement in the Global Business Environment
Location:
270 Mervis Hall (Colloquium Room)
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

This interactive panel will discuss how displacement has affected employees and industries locally and globally. It will cover reasons for displacement and how different industries, regions, or countries tackle these issues.

12:00 pm Cultural Event
Artful Wednesday
Location:
Nordy's - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Ricardo & Jose Guitar Duo Ole! Flamenco guitarist Ricardo Marlow and Flamenco singer and guitarist Jose Oretea will have you clapping and stomping. Celebrate the beauty and diversity of the performing arts happening in our city at Artful Wednesdays! All Pitt students, faculty and staff are welcome to enjoy a free noontime performance luncheon in Nordy’s Place, William Pitt Union Lower Level. Valid Pitt ID required.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - Religion in Europe: 500 Years Since the Protestant Reformation
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
1:00 pm Panel Discussion
Confronting & Overcoming Hate
Location:
540 WPU
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Jewish Studies Program
See Details

Join Dr. Steven Luckert, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Historian and Curator and Louise Lawrence-Israels, Holocaust Survivor and Museum Volunteer, in a conversation about the power of hate speech during the Holocaust and its legacy in today's wired world.

Dr. Steven Luckert
Steven Luckert is Curator of the Permanent Exhibition at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Dr. Luckert joined the Museum as a historian in the Wexner Learning Center in 1994. The following year he became the Curator of the Permanent Exhibition. In this capacity, he is responsible for selection and incorporation of artifacts, researching and writing exhibition text, and handling all issues and inquiries pertaining to the exhibition.

In addition to these duties, Dr. Luckert has curated other Museum exhibitions, such as Father Jacques, which dealt with a Catholic rescuer in France, and Kristallnacht: the November 1938 Pogroms. In 1999, he co-curated Voyage of the St. Louis and Life Reborn: Jewish Displaced Persons, 1945-1951 with Susan Goldstein Snyder. In 2002, Dr. Luckert co-curated The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk. Most recently, he and Susan Snyder curated Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust, which opened at the Museum in September 2003, and traveled to the Spertus Museum in Chicago, the Art Center in Battle Creek, Michigan, the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, and the Minnesota Historical Society, Minneapolis. He curated the Museum’s latest exhibition, State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda, which opened on January 30, 2009.

Prior to coming to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Dr. Luckert taught European history at several campuses of the State University of New York and at George Mason University. He wrote the companion volume to the exhibition, The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk, and co-authored with Susan Bachrach, State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda. In 1993, he received his Ph.D. in modern European history from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Louise Lawrence-Israels
Louise was born in Haarlem, the Netherlands, in 1942. German forces had invaded the Netherlands in May 1940 and set up a German administration. The Nazi’s also confiscated the family business. By the time Louise was born antisemitic laws were enacted and Jews were forced to wear a yellow star. By July of 1942 deportations of Jews from the Netherlands to the extermination camps of Auschwitz and Sobibor had begun.
In January 1943 Louise and her family were ordered to move to Amsterdam, and shortly thereafter went into hiding to escape deportation. Louise’s father managed to rent a top floor apartment and acquired false identification papers for the family. Louise’s father had to leave the apartment after curfew to get food and medicine for the family; sometimes he brought home news about the war.

Louise’s parents tried to give the children a “normal” childhood in hiding; playing and learning colors, letters, and songs. It was in this apartment that Louise learned to walk. When air raid alarms sounded, the family took refuge on the steep staircase, the strongest and safest part of an Amsterdam row house. Louise’s mother had an emergency basket ready to take with them during air raids.

On May 5, 1945, Canadian forces liberated Amsterdam. Louise was three years old. Louise initially had difficulty adjusting to a world without walls, having never been outside for the duration of the hiding. After the war, the family did not talk about their life in hiding. Shortly thereafter Louise’s father found work in Stockholm, Sweden; Louise, her mother, brother and baby sister joined him during the winter of 1946. The Israels family moved back to the Netherlands in 1948. Louise earned a degree in physical therapy in the Netherlands, and in 1965 she married Sidney Z. Lawrence, an American medical student in Amsterdam. They moved to the US in 1967. After Sidney retired from the U.S. military in 1994, they settled in Bethesda, Maryland. Louise volunteers at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

3:00 pm Lecture
Hidden Children of the Holocaust
Location:
O'Hara Ballroom
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Jewish Studies Program
See Details

Renée L. Sachs was part of the only 5% of Jewish children in Europe who survived the Holocaust. Her legacy is one of educating future generations against the mistakes of the past. Today, her husband and Pitt alum Keith Sachs continues this legacy by telling Renée's story.

3:30 pm Career Counselling
Serving Abroad: Building Experiences and Careers in an Ethical and Meaningful Way
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Passionate about helping others? Want to take that passion and help others on a global level? Then you’ll want to come to this exciting global service learning workshop co-sponsored by CDPA and PittServes where we’ll feature panelists and discuss “purposeful” travel abroad.

This session is part of the Global Careers Week during Pitt's International Education Week!

4:00 pm Film/Panel Discussion
Cultural and Linguistic Diversity: Living and Working Together
Location:
G17 (Robert Henderson Language Media Center) Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Diversity may mean different things to different people. In this documentary, we have interviewed several people at Pitt about: (1) what diversity means to them, (2) the value of diversity in their life and work, and (3) their opinion about the most effective way to support diversity. This documentary was produced as part of the "Cultural and Linguistic Diversity Conference: Living and Working Together" which was held at the University of Pittsburgh in celebration of the Provost’s Year of Diversity initiative.
Light refreshments served.

5:00 pm Exhibit
Global Engagement Fair
Location:
Ballroom - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

Perhaps you were not able to study abroad during your time at the University. Or perhaps you did and are craving a connection to the global landscape within Pittsburgh. The Global Engagement Fair is a one-stop shop for a multitude of opportunities to interact with the world beyond Pittsburgh while still in Pittsburgh. Representatives will be present from student organizations, academic units, non-profit organizations, scholarship programs, and many more. Come and learn about the wonderful opportunities that Pitt and Pittsburgh have to offer to make the global local.

5:00 pm Cultural Event
International Fashion Showcase
Location:
Lower Lounge - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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This year during Pitt’s International Week, a Fashion Showcase will be featured to encourage exploration of culture through clothing. Everyone will have an opportunity to do a “walk-through” of native, cultural attire, while learning about the cultures of other countries! This event that’s not only going to be colorful but also educational!

7:00 pm Information Session
Pittsburgh Perspectives on Displacement
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and International Week
See Details

Join Pittsburgh professionals who work with refugees and immigrants to learn about refugee resettlement services, adapting to Pittsburgh, daily life, and ways to help. We will hear from representatives of Jewish Family and Children's Services, the Somali-Bantu Community Association, PRYSE Academy, and Northern Area Multi-Service Center, as well as from Syrian teens recently arrived in Pittsburgh. This is also part of the GSC Career Toolkit Series.

7:00 pm Information Session
The Asian American Immigrant and Refugee Experience
Location:
548 WPU
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

The topic will focus on the Asian American immigrant and refugee experience. ASA wants to highlight some of the regions where refugee and IDPs crises are happening but less known through a visual presentation. We will also explain the differences between refugees and IDPs and provide examples.

Thursday, October 19

10:00 am Panel Discussion
Language Access for Migrants and Refugees
Location:
302 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

This panel/workshop session will discuss language access for migrants and refugees in the Western Pa region, with guests from the Mayor's office, the Greater Pgh Literacy Council (ESL), and other agencies working on these issues in an official capacity in the region.

10:00 am Career Counselling
Global Drop-In Hours
Location:
2nd Floor - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

First-come, first serve 20-minute appointments with the designated career consultant for global careers. These drop-in hours are for students who want to learn how to live and work abroad, learn about gap year programs, find H1B employers [for international students], resources and more!

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Bhutanese and Burmese Teenage Refugee Panel
Location:
UCIS 4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
See Details

A panel presentation of Bhutanese and Burmese young adults whose families were evicted from their countries. Most of the presenters have never seen their homelands, having been born in refugee camps after their parents' displacement. The presenters will speak briefly to the experience of living in refugee camp and also of the challenges of moving to the United States.

12:00 pm Information Session
Summer Study Abroad Scholarship Information Session
Location:
CL 501
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Information Session outlining eligibility and logistics of the Nationality Rooms Summer Study Abroad Scholarships.

12:30 pm Information Session
International Fellowship Opportunities for U.S. Students
Location:
G20 Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

The CILE will invite specialists to discuss the Fulbright, Boren, PeaceCorp fellowship opportunities that are available to domestic U.S. students. The audience will be School of Law students.

1:00 pm Presentation
Jumpstart Your Cultural Competency at Pitt
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

We will examine how international students adjust to life in the United States. Then, we will incorporate these lessons into a broader discussion about improving our cultural competence in a global society.

2:00 pm Panel Discussion
Crossing Borders: Environmental Cooperation in Israel and Palestine
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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This event is focused on Israeli-Palestinian dialogue taking place at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies. Hosted during Pitt’s International Week, this event would feature two alumni of the Arava Institute – one from an Israeli background and one from an Arab background – who came together to study trans-boundary environmental issues at the Arava Institute.

About The Dialogue Project:

Every semester, two alumni of the Arava Institute visit U.S. college campuses to share their stories of regional cooperation. By working with student organizations, faculty members, study abroad offices, and other departments within the university, this tour raises awareness of the important cross-border environmental work taking place at the Arava Institute and in the region.

During the 2016-2017 academic year, the Dialogue Project visited 30 distinct university campuses throughout the United States and was featured in multiple student publications including those at the University of Colorado and Binghamton University.

About the Arava Institute:

The Arava Institute for Environmental Studies is a leading environmental studies and research program in the Middle East. It houses academic programs in partnership with Ben Gurion University, research centers, and international cooperation initiatives focusing on a range of environmental concerns and challenges.

With a student body comprised of Jordanians, Palestinians, Israelis, and students from around the world, the Arava Institute offers students an exceptional opportunity to learn from leading professionals while forming friendships and developing skills that enable them to lead the region and the world in solving today’s most pressing environmental challenges.

3:00 pm Presentation
Osama Alomar Poetry Reading
Location:
Croghan-Schenley Room
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
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Osama Alomar is a Syrian author turned taxi driver who is now returning back to his roots in writing! Mr. Alomar moved to Chicago, Illinois from Syria in 2008, and upon arrival, his occupation changed from author to taxi driver. As a cab driver he had little to no time to write...Now he has moved to the city of Pittsburgh with the help of City of Asylum, where he focuses much of his time on writing again. From Syria to Chicago to Pittsburgh, Osama Alomar is now coming to the University of Pittsburgh to share some of his inspirational, world-renowned poetry with you!

Alomar will read excerpts from his latest book, "The Teeth of the Comb & Other Stories."

This event is free.

3:00 pm Cultural Event
Osama Alomar Poetry Reading
Location:
156 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Osama Alomar is a Syrian author turned taxi driver who is now returning back to his roots in writing! Mr. Alomar moved to Chicago, Illinois from Syria in 2008, and upon arrival, his occupation changed from author to taxicab driver. As a cab driver he had little to no time to write… Now he has moved to the city of Pittsburgh with the help of City of Asylum, where he focuses much of his time on writing again! From Syria to Chicago to Pittsburgh, Osama Alomar is now coming to the University of Pittsburgh to share some of his inspirational, world-renowned poetry with you!

4:00 pm Lecture
Why Do Former First Ladies run for Office?
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas at Pitt
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Why do former first ladies run for political office? Seventeen former first ladies ran for the presidency, vice presidency or Congress between 1990 and 2016, but the scholarly literature has failed to systematically analyze this phenomenon. We argue that former first ladies run for office when they have political ambitions and when the sociopolitical context offers them an opportunity to be competitive candidates. We analyze the 88 former first ladies who were available to run for office in 133 elections in 18 Latin American countries from 1990-2016. To test our argument, we conduct discrete-time duration models. The findings demonstrate that political ambition is the main factor that explains why former first ladies run for office. We also show that politically ambitious first ladies behave strategically, taking advantage of the opportunities they have to become candidates.

5:00 pm Cultural Event
The Filipino Diaspora
Location:
630 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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The event's theme revolves around the Filipino diaspora. There will be students who will act as different people who have been affected by it. The background stories for the characters will come from "In the Country",novel by Filipina author Mia Alvar, and from Filipinos in the Pittsburgh community.

6:00 pm Lecture
Julissa Arce: The American DREAMer - From Undocumented to Wall Street Immigration Advocate
Location:
William Pitt Union Ballroom
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Julissa Arce is a writer, CNBC contributor, and advocate for immigrant rights and education. She is the Co-founder and Chairman of the Ascend Educational Fund, a college scholarship and mentorship program for immigrant students, regardless of their status, ethnicity, or national origin. Julissa is also a board member for the National Immigration Law Center and College Spring. She is the former Director of Public Affairs at Define American, a media organization that uses the power of story to change the narrative surrounding immigration and citizenship. Prior to becoming an advocate, she built a successful career on Wall Street working for Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch, and had seemingly achieved the American Dream—yet she still did not feel like a true American.

9:00 pm Symposium
Global Trivia Night
Location:
University Club, Ballroom B
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and International Week
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Come join us for our 3rd annual Global Trivia Night! Compete with groups of up to five undergraduate students, and test your knowledge in global categories like Global Current Affairs, World Culture, World History, Geography, and more. Prizes include Apple Watches, Beats headphones, and Chipotle gift cards. Free food and beverages will be provided! Registration will close on Tuesday, October 17th at 11:59 PM, or once capacity is reached. Teams can register at https://goo.gl/forms/5FRcQYsInhiHEeBl1.

Friday, October 20 until Saturday, October 21

8:00 am Conference
(des)articulaciones 2017--6th Graduate Student Conference
Location:
CL, University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Office of the Provost, John Beverley, and the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Organization, Dean for Graduate Research and the Humanities Center and Cultural Studies
See Details

http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/graduate/international-grad-student-conference

(des)articulaciones 2017: (De)conceptualizations: Beyond Identity, Coloniality and the Subaltern

Date: October 20-21, 2017

Keynote Speakers: Lurgio Gavilán and Nelson Maldonado-Torres

Frederic Jameson proposed that third world texts should be read as national allegories, considering that politics and libidinal dynamics are equally involved in mapping out the whole. Behind this view lies the idea that these texts only function as displays of a collective reality by way of an individual and subjective reality. In addition, this notion reinforces the fact that national allegories are based on the idea of identity as a fixed and hereditary entity which does not change with time, when in reality, identities are cultural constructs which we define in our relations with others, i.e., fluid constructions which are ever changing and in progress. Identity interpreted contrary to a universalist and essentialist view, as Stuart Hall affirms, is a “structured representation which only achieves its positive through the narrow eye of the negative. It has to go through the eye of the needle of the other before it can construct itself.” Therefore, the matter here, following Levinas, is one of accepting alterity as a constitutive part of the subject while, on the other hand, not falling into a stereotyped vision of reality. Achille Mbembe says that, “in Foucault’s terms, racism is above all a technology aimed at permitting the exercise of biopower, that old sovereign right of death.” In other words, the form of looking at the other is defined by a peculiarity and legitimacy that stems from violence and murder.

We propose to think about theory from various angles, which take into account crises of national allegory, failures of identity and thinking about Latin America as a homogenous block. By revising the core ideas proposed, we allow ourselves to reflect on the extent to which the production of knowledge can be realized inside, and outside of, the theoretical, political and social debate. To this end, we call for interdisciplinary approaches that, by means of alternative theories and/or empirical practices, try to place themselves outside of the established theoretical frameworks in order to enrich them with new reflections and hypotheses. Concepts of identities, coloniality, and the subaltern, amongst others, are standard in the Academy. Thus, our proposal is not only to rethink them, but also to furnish them with new meaning or unveil their methodological gaps.

Abstracts can focus on the following topics (although other related topics are welcome):

The transformation of local, national and international identities (transpacific and transatlantic studies)
The recent political developments and their effect on the perceptions of the Other and the sense of self-identity
Questions of race, discrimination and racism in the global stage
“Frontier” literature and related works
Latino writers in the United States of America
Indigenismo and political struggles
Theories of decolonization, the establishment of identity labels and the process of identity formation itself
Dictatorship, dirty war, forced disappearance and necropolitics
Ayahuasca tourism and its emerging market
Borders, drug trafficking and identity
Popular music and identities

Friday, October 20

11:00 am Career Counselling
Global Company Tour
Location:
5th Floor - William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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Interested in having a global career? Are you wanting to either work abroad or work for a global company in the States? Then this is the opportunity for you! There will be five, 20-minute “meet and greets” with employers in designated rooms on the 5th floor of the William Pitt Union with the opportunity to rotate in and out of different ones to get the most information and advice possible in regard to launching your global career. Additionally, we will have a ‘networking room’ with alumni and other organizations/employers to get more one-on-one time to discuss possibilities and interest. This event is open to all international and domestic students. Career Passports will be distributed to students to get ‘stamped’ and raffled off to win exciting prizes!

This is a part of the Global Career Week during Pitt's International Week!

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
internships in Africa
Location:
4217
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
See Details

This event features practitioners in the field both in the United States and Africa

Victoria Nalongo, Bright Kids, Uganda
Hanifa Nakiryowa, Center for Rehabilitation of Survivors of Acid and Burns Violence (CERESAV), Uganda
Jenny Roach & Margaret Wambui, Hekima Place, Kenya
Justin Forzano, Founder & CEO, Cameroon FDP

Date: October 20, 2017
Venue: 4217 WWPH
Time: 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

This roundtable discussion forum will be an opportunity for students to learn about community-based development organizations in Cameroon, Kenya & Uganda. The round-table discussants will talk about the various roles of their organizations as service providers and change agents. Students will learn and find out ways they can participate through internship or volunteer opportunities. The guests will be happy to answer any questions from the audience and share personal stories

12:00 pm Colloquium
The Magic of K-Pop
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
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The rise of Korean music (K-Pop) around the world in the last two decades has been a mystery to many industry experts. Some compares it to the explosion of British rock and roll in 1960s (“The British Invasion”), calling it “The Korean Wave (Han-Ryu)”. Even though it is not a part of the main stream music worldwide, it definitely deserves our attention as a cultural sensation. What is the magic ingredient of K-Pop for its worldwide popularity? How has a tiny country such as South Korea become a major exporter of a cultural product? We will first discuss the history of the rise of K-Pop and try to identify the answers to these questions. Our focus will be on K-Pop as a cultural product and examine the market forces including the consumers who adopted K-Pop as their music of choice.

3:00 pm Lecture
The Dynamics of the Interrelationship Between Language and Thought in Processing Motion: What Eye Movements Can Show Us
Location:
Cathedral of Learning G13
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Linguistics
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Does the language that we speak influence the way we think, perceive reality or remember certain aspects of it? The so-called "linguistic relativity" debate has been recently reinvigorated by a new generation of technology-assisted cross-linguistic and bilingual studies suggesting that both linguistic and non-linguistic cognitive behavior (attention, memory, etc.) are influenced by our native and additional languages. In her talk, Dr. Victoria Hasko analyzes the domain of motion to investigate the differences in how native speakers of English and Russian talk about motion and space and how they interrogate motion events visually and verbally. Her work is motivated by the evidence of significant acquisitional difficulties in the ability of English-speaking American learners of Russian to verbalize motion events in Russian in a native-like manner, suggesting resistance to to cognitive restructuring.

3:00 pm Career Counselling
Study Abroad Re-Entry and Career Integration Workshop
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
International Week
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This workshop is for students who have studied abroad and have now returned. In collaboration with the study abroad office and CDPA, rotation stations with table topics will feature how to market your skills learned from your international experience, your elevator pitch, resume reviews, fun activities, resources and much more!

This workshop will be a part of Global Careers Week during Pitt's International Week!

5:00 pm Reception
Opening Reception for Displacement(s) Film Series
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Cloisters
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Week
See Details

Please join the International Week Committee and University Center for International Studies for the opening reception of the Displacement(s) film series. Refreshments will be provided prior to the first films in the series beginning at 6pm.

6:00 pm Film
Menstrual Practices and Displacement in Far-West Nepal: A Series of Short, Collaborative Documentary Films Highlighting Menstrual Practices (80 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Global Health Student Association
See Details

Menstrual Practices and Displacement in Far-West Nepal: A Series of Short, Collaborative Documentary Films Highlighting Menstrual Practices (60 minutes)
Menstruation is a monthly, natural, biological process for healthy girls and women 1. The onset of menstruation often signals girls into womanhood 2, and is a fundamental factor of human reproduction 1. Though this natural phenomenon is a sign of good health, and celebrates women’s ability to reproduce, it often comes with challenges for billions of women and girls around the globe 3. In Nepal, a country with over 28.5 million people 4 and 125 caste/ethnic groups 5, menstrual practices can be particularly hazardous 6. In the far-western region of the country, many women practice a century-old Hindu tradition called chhaupadi that views menstruating women as impure and displaces them from their homes to a small shed during their period and after childbirth 6,7. Women have experienced incidents of violence, snakebites, rape and even death while practicing chhaupadi 6,7. Though Nepal’s supreme court banned chhaupadi in 2005 7,8, evidence reveals that it is still widely practiced in the mid and far-western parts of the country 6,9. This film project aimed to develop a deeper, visual understanding of menstrual practices in Far-West Nepal. The research team equipped seven girls with cameras to film their menstrual practices, and engaged participants as community-based researchers. The films revealed that there are in fact a variety of practices, and a range of beliefs regarding menstruation in the community; and using collaborative film-making allowed the team to uncover important nuances. The films were filmed and directed by the seven girls themselves.
Trailer: https://vimeo.com/230438677

Discussion with Filmmaker Sara Liza Baumann (20 minutes)

7:30 pm Film
Mare Nostrum (14 minutes) & On the Bride’s Side (89 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and International Week along with CMU IFF
See Details

Mare Nostrum (14 minutes)
On the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, a Syrian Father makes a decision that puts his daughter's life at risk.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ybh4czwN6YE

On the Bride’s Side (89 minutes)
A Palestinian poet and an Italian journalist meet five Palestinians and Syrians in Milan who entered Europe via the Italian island of Lampedusa after fleeing the war in Syria. They decide to help them complete their journey to Sweden – and hopefully avoid getting themselves arrested as traffickers – by faking a wedding. With a Palestinian friend dressed up as the bride and a dozen or so Italian and Syrian friends as wedding guests, they cross halfway over Europe on a four-day journey of three thousand kilometers.
Trailer: http://www.iostoconlasposa.com/en/#trailer

Discussion with Pitt Professor Heath Cabot

Saturday, October 21

9:00 am Cultural Event
Pitt Make a Difference Day 2017
Location:
University of Pittsburgh, William Pitt Union, 3959 5th Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of Student Affairs (Office of PittServes)
See Details

Description
10th ANNUAL PITT MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY
This link is for University of Pittsburgh STUDENTS, STAFF, and FACULTY from the Pittsburgh campus to register for Pittsburgh's largest day of service! Alumni and regional campus attendees should contact pmadd@pitt.edu to obtain the registration link for your participation in PMADD!

All student participants have the opportunity to register with their residence hall, student organization, or can sign up as an individual to serve. By registering, you agree to participate in Pitt's largest day of service to the community at a Pittsburgh regional site to make a difference in a local community!

What are the requirements?
Attend assigned service project on 10/21/17. All students are required to report to buses at 9am and will serve until 2pm. Buses will return to campus by 3pm.
Wear appropriate attire and close toe shoes. PMADD is rain or shine.
Bring a water bottle.
Do not print your eventbrite ticket - save paper!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pitt-make-a-difference-day-2017-registratio...

12:00 pm Film
The Colors of the Mountain (93 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and International Week
See Details

LOS COLORES DE LA MONTAÑA
(90 minutes, Colombian film)

Come and enjoy a great film and some delicious Colombian empanadas!

Manuel, 9, has an old ball with which he plays football every day in the countryside. He dreams of becoming a great goalkeeper. His wishes seem set to come true when Ernest, his father, gives him a new ball. But an unexpected accident sends the ball flying into a minefield. Despite the danger, Manuel refuses to abandon his treasure... He convinces Julián and Poca Luz, his two friends, to rescue it with him. Amid the adventures and kids' games, the signs of armed conflict start to appear in the lives of the inhabitants of 'La Pradera'.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VzFHEcU070

English subtitles

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)

2:00 pm Film
Zoology (97 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and International Week
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Zoology (97 minutes)
Middle-aged zoo worker Natasha still lives with her mother in a small coastal town. As she struggles for independence, she has to endure the absurd reality of her life filled with gossip spread by the women around her. She is stuck and it seems that life has no surprises for her until one day… she grows a tail.
Embarrassed at first, Natasha decides to go further with the transformation and use it as an opportunity to redefine herself as a person and as a woman. With the new “accessory” she gets access to the life that she has never experienced before – she starts a relationship with a man, who finds her attractive, she goes out and allows herself to be foolish for the first time in her life. But her second puberty eventually comes to an end and Natasha has to make a choice between reality and illusion.
Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5133392/videoplayer/vi581219865?ref_=tt_ov_vi

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)

4:00 pm Cultural Event
Jugalbandi: Hinduastani and Carnatic Concert
Location:
326 Indian Nationality Room, Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of
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Jugalbandi is a performance in Indian classical music, especially the Hindustani classical music, that features a duet of two solo musicians. The word jugalbandi means, literally, "entwined twins."

Please join us in Pitt Sangeet's first Jugalbandi

Journey across Indian Classical Music featuring

4:00 pm Film
CHAR The No-Man’s Island (97 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Week
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CHAR The No-Man’s Island (97 minutes)
The film revolves around Rubel, a young boy who wants to attend school, but whose financial circumstances force him to become a smuggler from India to Bangladesh. Every day, he has to cross a river that forms the border between the two countries. He stays at an island named Char which is a no-man's land and is patrolled by the border security force of both countries.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWW_5lIbk2k

Discussion with Shashank Srivastava (10 minutes)

6:00 pm Film
The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and International Week
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The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)

In 2010, theatre director Ros Horin took a monumental task: to take the remarkable, intense and sometimes horrifying stories of four African refugee women and transform them into stories a transcendent work of theatre, starring the women themselves. But in Yarrie, Aminata, Yordy and Rosemary, Horin was to discover women of uncommon courage and charisma, who had passed through the worst that life could throw at them and were still determined to make their mark on the world. The women are given the power to voice the tremendous violence done to them, and transform their trauma into something cleansing, forceful and awe-inspiring. We believe this film can be an important tool to help change attitudes, deepen understanding and build empathy amongst all of us towards people who have experienced violence and trauma.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHLvWMn4N0A

6:00 pm Film
The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (85 minutes)
In 2010, theatre director Ros Horin took a monumental task: to take the remarkable, intense and sometimes horrifying stories of four African refugee women and transform them into stories a transcendent work of theatre, starring the women themselves. But in Yarrie, Aminata, Yordy and Rosemary, Horin was to discover women of uncommon courage and charisma, who had passed through the worst that life could throw at them and were still determined to make their mark on the world. The women are given the power to voice the tremendous violence done to them, and transform their trauma into something cleansing, forceful and awe-inspiring. We believe this film can be an important tool to help change attitudes, deepen understanding and build empathy amongst all of us towards people who have experienced violence and trauma.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHLvWMn4N0A

Discussion of the film (15 minutes)

8:00 pm Film
Screening: King of the Belgians
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 125
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

As part of the International Week film series on the theme of 'Displacement', the European Studies Center is proud to bring you the Pittsburgh premiere of the Cannes Film Festival acclaimed 'King of the Belgians'.

Trailer: http://www.kingof.be/#trailer

KING OF THE BELGIANS is a road movie in which a dormant King gets lost in the Balkans and awakens to the real world. Desperate to return home from a state visit to Istanbul when his country suffers its worst-ever political crisis, but unable to fly due to a solar storm, the King of the Belgians finds himself on a tumultuous road trip across the Balkans.

For questions, please contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

8:00 pm Film
The King of the Belgians (94 minutes)
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and International Week
See Details

The King of the Belgians (94 minutes)
The King of the Belgians is on a state visit in Istanbul when his country falls apart. He must return home at once to save his kingdom. But a solar storm causes airspace and communications to shut down. No planes. No phones. With the help of a British filmmaker and a troupe of Bulgarian folk singers, the King and his entourage manage to escape over the border. Incognito. Thus begins an odyssey across the Balkans during which the King discovers the real world - and his true self.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJa5C0_CqQI

Discussion of the film (10 minutes)