Week of October 22, 2017 in UCIS

Tuesday, October 24

6:45 pm Lecture
[Greensburg Campus] China Town Hall
Location:
Village Hall 118, University of Pittsburgh Greensburg Campus
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security
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CYBERSECURITY:
OBSTACLES AND OPTIMISM IN US-CHINA RELATIONS
Beth Schwanke, will lay out the current state-of-play in US-China relations focusing on how the flashpoints in the US-China relationship—economic competitiveness, national security, and human rights—are each deeply affected by cybersecurity issues. She’ll address China’s new cybersecurity law and offer reflections on the implications beyond China’s borders. She’ll conclude by laying out opportunities for the United States and China to work constructively together on cybersecurity issues.

Wednesday, October 25

3:00 pm Lecture
Postwar Tokyo: Reality and Imagination through the Camera
Location:
630 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
3:00 pm Lecture
The Unkindest Cut of All;
Location:
602 CL
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
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The lecture will explore how different theoretical approaches to the narrative, performative and cultural aspects of trials, particularly show trials, can illuminate the sexual and racial politics that underpinned the public’s fascination with the Lorena Bobbitt case. Firstly, addressing the location of Latinos in the trans-American social imaginary, profoundly marked by the
“coloniality of power.” Followed by inquiring how narrative and performative analyses can fruitfully recast the study of show trials to better appreciate their cultural and political implications.

And finally analyzing the stories put forward by both the defense and the prosecution and how they reenacted highly problematic racial and sexual tropes characteristic of the coloniality of power.

3:00 pm Information Session
Career Toolkit Series: Applying for Graduate Studies Abroad (for Students)
Location:
4209 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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Have you considered graduate school abroad? Does is cost more or less than studying in the USA? How does the overseas credential transfer back to PhD programs, or make sense to US employers? Hear directly from Pitt alumni who have received a graduate credential from overseas. Discuss ways to tailor your applications with admissions councilors and members of admissions committees. Learn the pros and cons and the tips and tricks to successfully apply for graduate programs abroad.

5:00 pm Lecture
Daughter of the Cold War: George Kennan as Father and Architect of 20th Century Geopolitics
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
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Grace Kennan Warnecke will speak on her recently completed memoir "Daughter of the Cold War." Daughter of the leading Cold War strategist George Kennan, Grace Kennan Warnecke has had a lifelong association with Russia and the former Soviet Union. She currently serves as Chairman of the Board of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, and is outgoing chair of the National Advisory Council, Harriman Institute, at Columbia University, as well as a member of the Advisory Council of the Kennan Institute. In 2013, she was named a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. Previously, she was founding executive director of the American-Soviet Youth Orchestra and associate producer of the prize-winning PBS documentary The First Fifty Years: Reflections on U.S.-Soviet Relations. As a professional photographer she was senior editor of A Day in the Life of the Soviet Union.

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
Nationality Rooms Scholarship Debriefing
Location:
Alumni Hall
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
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Informal question and answer with our 2017 scholarship winners!

Reception will follow.

This event is free.

Thursday, October 26

12:00 pm Film
"Stalin's Daughter" Screening
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
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It is a sensation in the midst of the Cold War. Stalin's daughter Svetlana Alliluyeva flees to the West. During her childhood in the center of power, she was Joseph Stalin's favorite child. But death and violence overshadow her life. Her mother and brother die, relatives are killed, Stalin has her lover abducted. The Iron Curtain prevents her dream of family. She, like no other, jumps from one system to the other and loses herself in doing so. Svetlana Alliluyeva's desire for freedom makes her a plaything of power between communism and capitalism. This documentary shows Interviews with friends and family, exclusive photos and documents and especially Svetlana Alliluyeva’s final and never-before broadcast interview introduce us to the witness of a century. Stalin's daughter – a documentary about a legendary and unusual woman.

4:30 pm Panel Discussion
Corporate Power, Surveillance, and the Future of Open Access
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with University Library System (ULS), History Department and Department of Sociology
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We live in an information economy, and the future of democracy and equity depend on everyone’s ability to access information. Yet, even as scholars and organizations work to make scholarly work openly available, the increased commercialization of information and technology, along with the enhanced capabilities for data collection and surveillance, threaten the ability for users to access that scholarly work. In addition, persistent racial, class, and gender divides exclude growing numbers of people from the internet and knowledge commons. Panelists will examine how the growing concentration of corporate control of internet service provision and content, including policies related to net neutrality, affect the ability of all people to have access to information. The broader implications of these developments for both democracy and inclusion and for the future of scientific inquiry will be discussed, and the panel will offer steps users can take to help protect internet freedom and the knowledge commons for all.

Part of a series of events for Open Access Week 2017 (Oct. 23-29)
Available online via webstream (http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/)

Friday, October 27

3:00 am Lecture
Humanitarian Exploits: Ordinary Displacement and the Political Economy of the Global Refugee Regime
Location:
Anthropology Lounge, 3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology
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Can the displacement of refugees continue to be understood as exceptional? The recent global increase in refugees has prompted calls to develop new solutions to displacement that focus on integrating refugees into the local economies of nations that receive them. Transforming refugees from economic burdens to economic benefits does not, however, resolve displacement: doing so only shifts the project of refugee protection from a supposedly humanitarian imperative to an economic incentive. Examining how political economy intersects with moral economy in the global refugee regime by drawing on fieldwork conducted with refugees in Uganda and Australia, Dr. Ramsay will describe efforts to incorporate refugees into local economies not only fail to resolve their displacement but serve to exacerbate it, with such “humanitarian exploits” transforming refugees from recipients of humanitarian aid to highly exploitable workers who are, in their words, unable to “make a life.” Not only is the displacement of refugees not exceptional: it is emblematic of an increasingly globalized experience of ordinary displacement through which citizenship and civic rights are stratified by reducing the value of human life to the potential to extract economic productivity.

10:00 am Workshop
Scales of History: Japan in 500 Years of Global History
Location:
501 Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS International Career Toolkit Site Visit: Global Wordsmiths
Location:
Global Wordsmiths
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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Pittsburgh has hundreds of nonprofits, NGOs, businesses, and government agencies doing international work! Meet with professionals working in a variety of ways to connect Pittsburgh with the world during the UCIS year long series! Learn about opportunities for students to get involved with local organizations, valuable qualities and experiences looked for in potential employees, and ways to prepare for future careers while in school. Global Wordsmiths is a local, woman-owned social enterprise that provides high quality, low-to-no-cost translation services for legal, business, conference, educational, medical and mental health settings in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania.

We will depart Pitt at 12 Noon and return by 3 PM.Space is limited to 15 students so reserve your space today! Sign up with google docs via our website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/toolkit, and leave a refundable deposit of $10 with Elaine Linn at the Global Studies Center (Posvar 4100). This site visit is arranged by the Center for Russian and East European Studies.

12:00 pm Lecture
Dueling Market Power: The politics of stock exchange delisting in the transatlantic space
Location:
4500 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of Political Science
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Economic great powers export domestic regulatory policies and force the costs of adjustment onto foreign firms and governments. Such arguments about market power regularly examine economic great powers in isolation and, thus, have less to say about a world governed increasingly by economic multipolarity. In their paper, Dr. Newman and his associates argue that a great power’s ability to force foreign actors into adjusting is not only conditioned by their relative economic clout but also by the political institutions that govern their markets. Specifically, they expect that where states choose to draw their jurisdictional boundaries directly shapes a polity’s global influence. When a polity expands its jurisdiction, harmonizing rules across otherwise distinct sub-national, or national markets, it can curtail a rival’s authority. They test the theory by assessing foreign firm delisting decisions from US stock markets after the adoption of the Sarbanes-Oxley accounting legislation. The Act, which included an exogenous, extraterritorial shock, follows the harmonization of stock market governance across various European jurisdictions. Econometric analysis of firm-level data illustrates that EU-based companies, which benefited from jurisdictional expansion, were substantially more likely to leave the American market and avoid adjustment pressures. Their findings contribute to debates on extraterritorial governance and authority in a transnational economy, highlight the critical role played by institutions in economic statecraft, nuance arguments about Europe as an international actor and provide evidence in favor of more relational theorizing in International Relations that examines the nexus of market access, political authority and compliance.

2:30 pm Information Session
Summer Study Abroad Scholarship Information Session
Location:
CL 304
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Informational session outlining the eligibility and logistics for the Nationality Rooms Programs Summer Study Abroad Scholarships.

2:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Department of Africana Studies
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Cancer in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is emerging as a public health problem and developing countries like Nigeria are not spared from this scourge. For many types of cancer in SSA, the risk of getting cancer or dying from the illness are similar due to late stage diagnosis, lack of treatment and the exorbitant cost of cancer care.

Despite the threat that cancer poses to public health in SSA, few countries in this region have data on cancer incidence. In Nigeria, until recently, information on cancer incidence, prevalence and mortality in Nigeria has been based on estimates from case series, medical records, mortality records, hospital based cancer registries and the cancer registry. We studied information on cancer treatment, outcome and experiences at Lakeshore, a comprehensive cancer center. Lakeshore cancer center is situated in Lagos a city of 8 million in Nigeria. It is the 1st operational facility in Nigeria solely dedicated to cancer prevention and treatment, it was launched on January 24, 2015.

Please join us for a discussion with Dr. Fapohunda who will share her research experience at the Lakeshore Comprehensive Cancer Center in Lagos, Nigeria. Pizza will be served.

3:00 pm Lecture
Constructing the Terrorist Threat
Location:
332 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Cultural Studies, Department of Communication, Department of English, Department of Religious Studies, Department of Sociology and Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
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Deepa Kumar is an Associate Professor of Media Studies at Rutgers University and President, Rutgers AAUP-AFT faculty union. She is a leading scholar in communication, prominent public intellectual, and champion of the humanities on the national stage. The title of her lecture, “Constructing the Terrorist Threat: Islamophobia, the Media, and the War on Terror,” stems from her 2017 Media Education Foundation video, designed to support pedagogical efforts to teach critically about media discourse on Muslims.

3:00 pm Panel Discussion/Presentation
Dealing with Poverty Within and Beyond the City: restitution of case-studies on Hazelwood, Homestead, Homewood and Wilkinsburg
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and Universite Jewn Monnet Saint-Etienne; Universite de Lyon; Sciences Po Lyon; La Region Auvergne-Rhone-Aples
See Details

Altervilles Study Trip in Pittsburgh
21st-28th of October 201City and Urban Environnement Master Degree
University of Lyon (France)

Part of the Pitt-Université Jean Monet-Université de Lyon partnership.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature 2017-2018
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Khet Mar is a Burmese writer and political activist who was persecuted, tortured, and imprisoned in her home country. She is currently living at City of Asylum in Ithaca, NY as an exiled writer-in-residence. Her short novel about two oppressed teenagers speaking to each other through their apartment windows was, in her words, “a fictional way to express what happened to me in jail.” Yet, the Burmese censors read the plot as metaphor and banned the novel. Khet Mar will lead the discussion herself, in person. We will conclude with ideas for using the texts in the classroom. Books, dinner, parking and Act 48 hours provided.

5:00 pm Reading Group
CERIS Book Discussion: EXIT WEST
Location:
Greensburg Room, Administration Building, Seton Hill University
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Seton Hill University
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Faculty, graduate students, K-16 educators and librarians are invited to attend the CERIS fall 2017 complimentary dinner and book discussion. The discussion will be facilitated by Rachel Sternfeld, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Participation via the Internet is also an option. Please register at https://cerisnet.secure.pitt.edu/resource/faculty-readers-forum. A limited number of free copies of the book are available. A dinner, hosted by Seton Hill University and CERIS will take place at 5:00 PM in the Greensburg Room of the Administration Building and the book discussion will follow in the Reeves Learning Commons to follow at 6:30 PM