Week of November 26, 2017 in UCIS

Monday, November 27

12:00 pm Lecture
DEATH AND LITERATURE: TIME, SICKNESS, AND WRITING
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 501
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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This talk will offer an overview of professor Robert Tierney's research on
modern Japanese death literature. He defines "death literature" as a body
of works defined by an existential encounter with sickness and death,
rather than as a specific literary genre. He focuses on works by three
writers from the Meiji period: Nakae Chōmin (1847-1901) ,Masaoka Shiki
(1867-1902), and Natsume Sōseki (1867-1916). The philosopher
Chōmin wrote One Year and a Half (Ichinen yūhan), and Sequel to One
Year and A Half (Zokuichinen yūhan) in 1901 after a doctor discovered a
cancerous tumor in his throat and told him he had a year and a half left to
live. The poet Shiki, bedridden with spinal tuberculosis from 1896, wrote
daily chronicles of his life that appeared in the Nihon Newspaper in 1901
and 1902: A Drop of Ink (Bokujū itteki) and A Sickbed Six Feet Long
(Byōsho rokushaku). After a near-death experience in Shūzenji in 1911,
the novelist Soseki came "back to life" and wrote Reminiscences and
other matters (Omoidasu koto nado) in 31 installments in the Asahi
Newspaper. He will look at similarities and differences in the way these
writers approached sickness and time and found meaning through
writing.

The lecture is open for public. Refreshments will be served.

2:00 pm Film
Adilkhan Yerzhanov's film "The Owners"
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
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Introduction by and post-screening Q&A with the film producer Serik Abishev (Kazakhstan)

"Kafka meets Kaurismaki in this bleakly funny Kazakh drama.... The Owners is a caustic critique of small-town corruption and croneyism in contemporary Kazakhstan."
--Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

7:00 pm Presentation
More Than Just Mosaics: The Ancient Synagogue at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee
Location:
324 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with Jewish Studies Program
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Since 2011, Professor Jodi Magness has been directing excavations in the ancient village of Huqoq. The excavations have brought to light the remains of a monumental Late Roman synagogue building paved with stunning mosaics, including a variety of biblical scenes. In this slide-illustrated lecture, Professor Magness describes these exciting finds, including the discoveries made in last summer's season.

Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Israel Heritage Room, which opened in November 1987. Reception and informal tours to follow.

Tuesday, November 28

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS International Career Toolkit Series: Michelle Kirby & my Agro: Helping Farmers Find Financing
Location:
Posvar 4217
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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Are you interested in international development? Do you have a passion for impactful social enterprise? If so, don't miss the opportunity to hear from Michelle Kirby! Michelle has spent a decade working across the globe: from Mali to Madagascar, Brazil to Indonesia, DC to the DRC. She spent three years working for One Acre Fund in Rwanda, she consulted for the World Bank and Madagascar's Office of National Nutrition. She currently serves as the Senegal Country Director for myAgro, an innovative social enterprise that provides financing to small-hold farmers who lack access from traditional banks and Microfinance institutions. myAgro's innovative bank-less savings scheme has helped increase average harvests for myAgro farmers 50-100% over traditional farms, and net farming income increases $150-$300 per farmer.

4:00 pm Information Session
UCIS International Career Toolkit Site Visit: WholeRen
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Pittsburgh is exploding as an education destination with students from across the globe! Join UCIS and the Asian Studies Center on this month's site visit to WholeRen to learn about their work on integrating and promoting Chinese-American educational opportunities and potential ways that you can get involved.

WholeRen, headquartered in Pittsburgh, was founded by Chinese and American professional educators in 2010 to create and promote cross cultural educational opportunities. WholeRen integrates a range of educational services geared towards assisting international students succeed in Pittsburgh including high school and college academic application consulting, college transfer services, skills training workshops, on-going academic counseling, immersion classrooms, and Chinese-American cultural exchanges, and executive education.

Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/bvt2C8FKIkD2wZk93 Space is limited to 10 students so sign up early! Preference is given to Junior and Senior students. You must finalize your registration with a refundable $10 cash deposit to Elaine Linn in the Global Studies Center (Posvar 4100).

Wednesday, November 29

12:30 pm Student Club Activity
Student Lunch
Location:
4209 Posvar
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
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From 12:00 to 1:30-ish on Wednesday, November 29th (in 4209 Posvar), students will have the opportunity to have lunch with Sierra Green, an archivist at the Heinz History Center. In an informal discussion over lunch Sierra will talk about her career path so far, trends she sees in the fields of archival and museum work, and suggestions she’d offer students who are interested in eventually pursuing grad programs and jobs in her field. A brief bio: A native of Adamsville, Pennsylvania, Sierra Green completed her Masters in Library and Information Science with a specialization in Archives, Preservation, and Records Management from the University of Pittsburgh in 2012. As an archivist at the Heinz History Center’s Detre Library & Archives, Sierra is engaged in archival processing and reference services in addition to her work in public and educational programming. Throughout her graduate and professional work thus far, Sierra has fostered a deep passion for and interest in archival outreach, engagement, and public awareness. She takes great pleasure in spreading the word about archival collections and the work of archivists within a museum environment.

2:00 pm Reception
Women's International Club Holiday Reception
Location:
University Club Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Women's International Club Holiday Reception.
$10 Admission per person.

Proceeds go to the Philippine Nationality Room Construction!

Tina Purpura demonstration on making sugar flowers, a Filipino artistic tradition!

Scholarship Awardees Kyle Wyche and Kelsea Lasorda present their experiences in Ecuador and South Africa, respectively.

Thursday, November 30

12:00 pm Lecture
Populist Discourse and Civic Culture
Location:
4217 Wesley Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
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How does the political discourse of populist leaders affect citizens’ orientations towards the democracy? Latin America offers some of the most representative cases of populism, as well as significant negative cases, where populism has not occurred. The main goal is to identify differences between the governing styles of two Latin American leaders in order to provide clues about links between populism and political culture of their citizens. I analyze the content of the political discourses of two presidents in Latin America: Rafael Correa and Jose Mujica. The former is considered a case of a populist regime, while the latter considered is a case of the non-occurrence of populism. Changes in citizens’ attitudes and orientations towards democracy could reveal the impact of populist frames that leaders develop in their political discourses.

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
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Derric I. Heck is a Graduate Research and Teaching Associate of the Center for Urban Education housed within the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a Diversity Scholar as well as a K. Leroy Irvis Fellow. His research includes a focus on how teachers rationalize and navigate topics of race within the classroom; how the learning environment acts as facilitator of cultural dialogue; and how U.S. teachers engage and utilize the indigenous wisdom and various cultures within Africa as a teaching and learning too. He will discuss his research using case study examples from Kenya and Ethiopia

6:00 pm Lecture
Angry Subjects: In/Civility, Christian Nationalism, and Paranoid Position in an Age of Trump
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 602
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, Department of Religious Studies, University Honors College, and the Year of Diversity at the University of Pittsburgh, and Humanities Center, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Programs in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies and Sexuality & Women’s Studies and Jewish Studies.
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Join the Department of Religious Studies for this free and public installment of their "Queering Religion" series presented by Ann Pellegrini, Professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis & Director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University. In addition to her groundbreaking Love the Sin with Janet Jakobsen (2003, 2004), Ann Pellegrini is author of Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race (1997); coauthor of “You Can Tell Just By Looking” and 20 Other Myths About LGBT Life and People with Michael Bronski and Michael Amico (2013); coeditor of Secularisms with Janet Jakobsen (2008) and Queer Theory and the Jewish Question with Daniel Boyarin and Daniel Itzkovitz (2003). Pellegrini coedits the Sexual Cultures Series (NYU Press) and is currently completing a book on “queer structures of religious feeling.” A reception will follow.

This event is cosponsored by the Provost’s Year of Diversity, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women’s Studies and Jewish Studies.

7:00 pm Film
The Divine Order
Location:
McConomy Auditorium
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Swiss-American Society of Pittsburgh, CMU Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion and CMU Gender Programs and LGBTQ+ Initiatives
See Details

Winner of the Audience Award for Best Narrative Film at the Tribeca Film Festival, The Divine Order is set in Switzerland in 1971 where women are still denied the right to vote. When Nora (Marie Leuenberger, winner of a Best Actress award at Tribeca), an unfulfilled housewife, is forbidden by her husband from taking a part-time job, her growing interest in women's liberation turns her into the poster child for her town's suffragette movement. Refusing to back down in the face of opposition, she convinces the women in her village to go on strike. In today's world where many are still fighting to be heard, The Divine Order is an uplifting look at how much change a small group--or even one person--can enact if they stand up for what they believe in.

Friday, December 1

3:00 pm Lecture
Seeking Cooks & Locating Kitchens across South Asia and Beyond
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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This paper considers the methodological challenges of writing histories of cooks and kitchens out of an archival context where both early texts that dwell on rituals, dietetics, or gourmandry and the printed sources that offer recipes seldom reveal the working lives and local structures that underlay their subject. The paper explores how one might creatively read such disparate texts and expand the meanings of kitchens and archives in order to locate South Asian foodways in terms of local and global histories of casted and classed labour and migrations, cultural circulation, colonial urban, commercial, and oceanic expansion, gendered innovation and interlocution.

Join us for the lecture and refreshments.