Week of January 14, 2018 in UCIS

Tuesday, January 16

12:30 pm Lecture
Lex Mercatoria and Soft Law in International Commercial Arbitration
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of
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Marco Torsello is Professor of Comparative Law at the School of Law of the University of Verona, Italy. He is also a Global Professor of Law in NYU School of Law's La w Abroad program in Paris, and an Adjunct Professor at the School of management, MIP-Politecnico di Milano. His many publications include articles on international commercial arbitration, EUcommercial law, and the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). He is the co-author with Franco Ferrari of "International Sales Law-CISG in a Nutshell"

4:00 pm Lecture
Feminist Posthumanism and Life in the Abyss
Location:
501G Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Cultural Studies, Department of English, GSWS Program, The Humanities Center and the Literature Program
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Join Distinguished Teaching Professor Stacy Alaimo from the University of Texas Arlington for her talk this January at Pitt. Prof. Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of the environmental humanities and gender studies. She has published three monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell UP, 2000);
Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana UP, 2010); and Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pressures in Posthuman Times (U of Minnesota P, 2016). Bodily Natures won the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) Award for Ecocriticism in 2011 and was featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy in 2013. Alaimo also coedited Material Feminisms (Indiana UP 2008), and her edited collection Matter is forthcoming in 2017 (Macmillan). She is known for developing the concept of "trans-corporeality," a concept widely in circulation and included as a key term in Rosi Braidotti's The Posthuman Glossary (2017). Her current book project is entitled "Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss."

Graduate students may also attend a lunchtime colloquium with Professor Alaimo from 11:00am- 1:00pm in 501G in the Cathedral. Contact Nancy Glazener (glazener@pitt.edu) to RSVP, get access to readings, and to convey dietary restrictions.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
A Roundtable Discussion on the Pitt World History Center’s World-Historical Gazetter Project
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of The World History Center and Department of History
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Featuring:
Anne Knowles (University of Maine), Ruth Mostern (History), Karl Grossner (Stanford), and Ryan Horne (World History Center)

Presented by the World History Center

4:00 pm Reception
Italian Fulbright Welcome Reception
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education and University of Pittsburgh School of Law
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Please join the European Studies Center and Center for International Legal Education in welcoming Francesca Ragno, this year’s Italian Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer, to the University of Pittsburgh for a welcoming reception in the Alcoa Room at 4:00 – 5:30 pm.

Francesca Ragno is Researcher (tenure position) and Adjunct Professor of International Law at the School of Law of Verona University. She graduated in Law (J.D.) with honors at the University of Bologna, and obtained her PhD degree from the University of Verona. Throughout her career she spent several research stays abroad, including at the University of Hamburg, University of Heidelberg, and NYU. Her teaching and scholarship span Private International Law, European Law, International Commercial Law, and International Arbitration.

In her capacity as our 2018 Italian Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer, Professor Ragno has left her home University (Verona) to spend a four-month period at the University of Pittsburgh for spring 2018, where she is teaching “EU from an International Law Perspective.” The overarching aim of her teaching project is to increase understanding in the US of EU law at a critical time for the very existence of the European Union and its role as a global actor. At the same time, she cherishes the opportunity to reflect with students on the raison d'être of the EU from an American perspective and on the benefits and the opportunities that the EU provides for the USA.

The University of Pittsburgh is proud to host one of only five Italian Fulbright Distinguished Chairs in the U.S., in partnership with the U.S. – Italy Fulbright Commission in Italy. The University of Pittsburgh Italian Fulbright Chair is administered by the European Studies Center in cooperation with the Departments of French & Italian, History, and History of Art and Architecture.

6:30 pm Film
Neruda (Chile)
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
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CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

NERUDA: Una Cacería Salvaje (Pablo Larraín, Chile, 2016)
*Subtitles provided in English
With commentary by Pedro Salas, Ph.D. Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Instructor, Slippery Rock University

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

From A. O. Scott’s New York Times’ Review: “’Neruda,’ Pablo Larraín’s semifantastical biopic, is a warmhearted film about a hot-blooded man that is nonetheless troubled by a subtle, perceptible chill. Blending fact with invention, it tells the story of a confrontation between an artist (the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda) and an emerging dictatorship, and more generally illuminates the endless struggle between political authority and the creative imagination. For anyone who believes that poetry and democracy spring from the same source and provoke the same enemies, this movie provides both encouragement and warning.”

Official Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neUwXV_cSwM

Thursday, January 18

2:00 pm Lecture
Consistently Invisible? Women's News Media Coverage during the European Elections, 1999-2014"
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
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Funded by the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

5:00 pm Lecture
Telling Spatial Stories of the Holocaust
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of History
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Historical Geographer Anne Knowles is co-founder of the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative http://holocaustgeographies.geo.txstate.edu/and a specialist in Historical GIS, Geovisualization, and Digital Humanities, with topical interest in intersections of economy, technology, and culture and their expression in the landscape. She will be Visiting Short-Term Fellow at Pitt's Humanities Center: see Humanities Center calendar for further events and workshops during her visit.

Presented by the Pittsburgh History Department Colloquium Series

5:00 pm Information Session
Global Studies Student Meeting
Location:
121 David Lawrence Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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A required informational meeting for all undergraduate students enrolled in GSC. Information presented will include opportunities about funding, study abroad, travel, pop-up courses, careers and important dates, and more! You'll meet the GSC staff as well as other students in the program. Snacks served along with special prizes!

Friday, January 19

12:00 pm Lecture
Support for Democracy in Decline: The LAPOP Americas Barometer 2016/17
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for International Studies (UCIS)
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Mitchell A. Seligson is the Centennial Professor of Political Science, Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor, and Professor of Sociology (by courtesy) at Vanderbilt University and Founder and Senior Advisor of Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP), which conducts the AmericasBarometer surveys that currently covers over 30 countries in the Americas. Seligson has carried out hundreds of surveys of public opinion, mainly focused on democracy and governance, in many countries in Latin America, but has also included projects in Africa and the Balkans. For details, see www.LapopSurveys.org.He currently is an elected member of the General Assembly of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights. Over the past decade, he has been awarded over $25nmillion in research grants and contracts. To read more about Dr. Mitchell Seligson visit:
https://www.vanderbilt.edu/political-science/bio/mitchell-seligson

Lunch will be provided.

for more information contact: ket82@pitt.edu

2:00 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series
Location:
3800 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Africana Studies Department; GSPIA; World History Center
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What can practices to commemorate official epidemic responses tell us about the logics of response itself? Specifically, what do they tell us about the visions and logics of care that such practices represent? In this paper, I compare two exhibits that describe efforts to respond to the 2014-6 West African Ebola epidemic: the Imperial War Museum’s “Fighting Extremes: From Ebola to ISIS” (London) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Ebola: People + Public Health + Political Will” (Atlanta). Even as they rely on remarkably similar objects – rubber boots, protective gear, tippy taps, short, looped video interviews with frontline workers – to tell their Ebola stories, they differ with respect to how objects are oriented in space, in relation to other objects, ideas, and experiences, and their strategic positioning within museum (and institutional) agendas, more generally. These differences form the basis of my analysis, which is still quite preliminary. For the military museum, Ebola represents an instance of the ‘extreme’ and the extraordinary capacity of the armed forces to provide care under challenging circumstances. The exhibit showcases the tensions of militarized humanitarianism (referred to elsewhere as the ‘empire of hugs’): the military’s need to sustain itself through expansion of its work to humanitarian interventions and the counterinsurgency battles that are increasingly employing private military contractors. The CDC exhibit, while highlighting the contribution of its workers and ‘partnerships’ so central in US public health discourse plays to intimate dimensions of ‘population’ – suggesting that acts of care may occur outside the frame of the interpersonal. I end by discussing a recent trip to the in-progress National Ebola Museum in Njala, Sierra Leone, where questions of local ownership, memory and immunity linger in the archives.

3:00 pm Lecture
State Fictions and the Friction of Frontier Terrain: Songpan and the Huanglong Pilgrimage since Ming Times
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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What can the long history of a Sino-Tibetan region tell us about China’s frontiers? This talk develops themes of comparative interest from Contesting the Yellow Dragon: Ethnicity, Religion and the State by Xiaofei Kang and Donald S. Sutton, Brill (CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2016). Officialdom from Ming times to the PRC reform period worked to overcome the ‘friction of terrain’ (in James C. Scott’s expression) in remote Songpan, handicapped by limited resources and their own ideological assumptions. But the same handicaps, and the peculiar unfolding of local history, helped locals to find space for their own political and cultural expressions, producing a frontier identity not quite like any other.

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!