Week of February 18, 2018 in UCIS

Tuesday, February 20

6:30 pm Film
El Amparo (Venezuela)
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

El Amparo (Rober Calzadilla, Venezuela, 2016)
*Subtitles provided in English

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

At the end of the 80's, by the creeks of the Arauca river, near the Colombian-Venezuelan border, two men survived the brutality of a shooting in which 14 of their mates were killed. They claimed to be mere fishermen, but the Venezuelan army accused them to be guerrilla fighters, intimidating them in every possible way and even attempting to remove them from the cell where they were guarded by a policeman. Their neighbors prevented their transfer, but the pressure they faced to give in and submit the official version was overwhelming.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8D0JMRxF54

For more information, pelase visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, February 21

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, February 22

4:00 pm Lecture
Rebellious Youth and the Global 1960s: Politics, Punk Rock, and Propaganda in Cold War Japan
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
4:00 pm Lecture
Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
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The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

7:00 pm Performance
Black History Month Performance
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
See Details

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Friday, February 23 until Saturday, February 24

8:00 am Symposium
Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
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The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

Friday, February 23

9:30 am Panel Discussion
What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
4:00 pm Lecture
Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
5:00 pm Reading Group
CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
See Details

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

6:00 pm Presentation
CERIS Book Discussion, 2/23
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History
See Details

Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane. Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at UPitt. Discussion at 6:00 PM. Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt will facilitate the book discussion. Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard.

Saturday, February 24

2:00 pm Performance
Creative Survival, Creative Performance: Perusing the New Narrative
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.
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This is the culmination of a month of workshops with Pitt students exploring the creative process and utilizing autobiographical history as a vehicle for performance. Using movement, text, text-writing, vocalizations, theatre games, memory exercises, autobiographical musings, and storytelling, Rhodessa Jones will demonstrate her use of "art as social activism" to create social change.

3:45 pm Panel Discussion
Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History