Week of February 25, 2018 in UCIS

Friday, February 23 until Sunday, February 25

(All day) Seminar
Global Health Mini Course
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

With each emerging infectious disease, the interconnectedness of populations around the globe becomes more pronounced. Diseases not only affect the health of communities, but they have a profound impact on political, economic, and social stability within countries and regions. This course engages the interdisciplinary nature of global health by approaching the issue through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) developed by the United Nations. The SDGs range in focus from good health and well-being to gender equality to clean water and sanitation to affordable, clean energy. By engaging the ways that health has a stake in these goals, the course will bring the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and CMU to understand and address the issue surrounding global health from a myriad of perspectives and avenues. With a project-based focus, the course will assist students in engaging and impacting their local community though a global issue.

To register before January 26 (add/drop) PS 1903-1010 (10182). To register after January 26 please contact Veronica Dristas, Associate Director.

Monday, February 26

5:30 pm Lecture
Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Sociology
See Details

Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
by Dr. Carlo Tognato, Universidad Nacional, Colombia (Director, Center for Social Studies, National University of Colombia)
5:30 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Carlo Tognato. Profesor Asociado del Departamento de Sociología de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Bogotá. Se desempeña  actualmente como director del Centro de Estudios Sociales. Es también Faculty Fellow del Center for Cultural Sociology en Yale University y Fellow del Indo-Pacific Governance Research Centre de la University of Adelaide. Tiene un Ph.D. en Ciencia Política (UCLA) y en Economía Política (Universitá di Ancona, Italia), un MPhil en Relaciones Internacionales (University of Oxford) y un pregrado en Economía Política (Universitá Bocconi, Milán).

Sus intereses se enfocan principalmente en la sociología cultural, la sociología económica, y en particular sobre las relaciones entre sociedad civil y mercado, así como en la sociología cultural de la violencia.  Sus publicaciones más recientes incluyen un libro publicado en 2012 en Nueva York con Palgrave-Macmillan sobre la influencia de la cultura sobre el funcionamiento de las instituciones monetarias (Central Bank Independence: Cultural Codes and Symbolic Performance) y otro libro editado por él que saldrá en 2015 con Harvard University y con la Universidad Nacional de Colombia sobre el papel de las prácticas creativas en las políticas públicas (Rethinking Cultural Agency: The Significance of Antanas Mockus).

Wednesday, February 28

2:00 pm Film
The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.

Thursday, March 1

(All day) Cultural Event
THE 7TH ANNUAL MODEL AFRICAN UNION SIMULATION
Location:
WILLIAM PITT UNION ASSEMBLY ROOM & BALLROOM
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

In 2011, a group of African Studies students at the University of Pittsburgh participated in the college level Model African Union at the Howard University in Washington DC. After their experience in the simulation, they felt the need to promote the study of Africa among high school students in the Pittsburgh and South-Western Pennsylvania region. With the assistance of The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh, the Pitt High School Model African Union (MAU) was launched in 2012 as an experiential pedagogical method of teaching American students about Africa. The Pitt MAU serves as an educational simulation that provides opportunities for high school students to learn about Africa by studying the African Union and its inner workings. Students learn the role, structure, and performance of the African Union (AU) while searching for solutions to Africa’s key economic, social, and political problems. Agenda items and countries are assigned to the participating schools in advance, to allow for adequate preparations for the daylong conference. Under the guidance of their teachers, students study research issues facing the AU member states and prepare to hold debates and vote on resolutions that address these issues. This year, 2018, is the seventh year of the MAU hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

3:00 pm Film
Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

Dusan Makavejev’s Love Affair provides us with an example of cinematic reflexivity, which can be defined as any technique that reminds the viewer that he or she is watching a film. Reflexivity foregrounds the fact that film meaning is a function of a set of codes with ideological implications rather than a transparent reflection of reality. Reflexivity can be achieved through intertextuality, exaggeration of cinematic conventions or conspicuous narration that reminds us of the author’s mark on the text. These techniques are all in evidence in Love Affair, whose textual heterogeneity calls into question the earnestness of cinematic (including socialist) realism as well as the official ideologies of state communism. As Thomas Elsaesser notes, Love Affair juxtaposes three sites of meaning: “the liberating intimacy of a sexual relationship…, the public world of abstract didacticism and cold rationality…, [and] the memory of the Russian Revolution and Tito’s national liberation war”. (Elsaesser, European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood, p. 322) Our understanding of Makavejev’s view of 1960s Yugoslavian society depends on our interpretation of the ironic and tragic relationship between these three sites of meaning. (Alex Lykidis, "Love Affair," Critical Commons)

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

4:45 pm Panel Discussion
1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
See Details

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Early Works (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Vladimir Padunov, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Discussants: Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Friday, March 2

9:00 am Presentation
High School Japanese Speech Contest
Location:
Assembly Room, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Japan America Society of Pennsylvania

Saturday, March 3

8:30 am Workshop/Teacher Training--Area Studies/Teacher Training--Language
French Immersion Institute Workshop
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Samedi 3 mars 2018:
La situation linguistique et culturelle en Bretagne, Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon

Samedi 21 avril 2018:
Françoise Giroud & Simone Veil: deux écrivaines politiques pour la couse des femmes
Conférencière: Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh

Program runs from 9:00-13:30, with an 8:30 breakfast and 12:30 lunch included.

Registration deadlines: February 26th for March 3rd workshop; April 16th for April 21st workshop.
Enclose a $20.00 check for each program ($40.00 for both). Fee includes ACT 48 credit-4 -hours for each program, breakfast and lunch.) Send check payable to the University of Pittsburgh. To facilitate our records, please write on check memo: (French Immersion)

Bonnie Adair-Hauck: adairhauck@gmail.com

9:00 am Teacher Training
Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

2:00 pm Film
Film Screening: Bridge
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Bengali Association of Pittsburgh