Week of March 18, 2018 in UCIS

Monday, March 19

10:00 am Conference
Seminar on Cultures of the Lusosphere
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and The Brazilian Consulate in New York
See Details

For more information on event, please visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/lusosphere-seminar

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #4
Location:
#700 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

1:00 pm Lecture
Garhwali Folk Traditions in 21st Century India
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Garhwal is a rich and diverse cultural region in Uttarakhand in the Himalaya mountains of North India. Following political agitation for separation from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand was established in 2000 as the 27th state within the Republic of India. Much of the Garhwal region can be understood both in terms of the sacred landscape of the Himalaya and in terms of intense pressure to develop infrastructure for pilgrimage, tourism, and economic growth. This pressure has had a profound impact on the fragile environment, on the cultural history of folk traditions in the mountains, and on the lives of musicians, artists, bards, and poets, who have been displaced by the construction of dams, by flooding caused by deforestation, and because of road construction to accommodate pilgrims and tourists.

Professor Datta Ram Purohit, Garhwal's leading authority on the performing arts, recognized poet in the tradition of Garhwali bards, and accomplished director of the regions theatrical tradition, Pandava Lila, will speak on these issues, with specific reference to a catastrophic flood in the sacred Kedarnath Valley, 2013.

3:00 pm Lecture
Syndemic Diabetes: Entanglements with Poverty, Trauma, and AIDS
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Mendenhall will introduce the concept of syndics, a theory of how social and health problems travel together within and between populations. She will discuss the concept of syndemic diabetes (type 2) through the discussion of her mixed methods research among low-income urban communities int he United States, India, South Africa, and Kenya. In doing so, she argues that it is impossible to understand diabetes in such contexts without taking seriously the implications of poverty, trauma, mental illness, and AIDS.

4:30 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Department of History
See Details

China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway

Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University

Professor Jamie Monson became interested in Africa when she served as an agriculture volunteer for the Peace Corps in rural Kenya in 1980. She then completed her PhD in African History at UCLA, and took her first teaching position at Carleton College in 1991. In 2015, she accepted a position as a Professor of African History in the Department of History and Director of African Studies at Michigan State University. Monson’s early research focus was on agricultural and environmental history of southern Tanzania, and she has also worked on anti-colonial warfare in German East Africa. In the late 1990s, she began a new research project on the history of the TAZARA railway, built with Chinese development aid in Tanzania and Zambia in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Africa’s Freedom Railway, was published by Indiana University Press in 2011.

Most recently, Monson has been studying the history of China-Africa relations (and learning Chinese), and frequently performs research in China. Her new project is a study of technology transfer in the history of Chinese development assistance to Africa. A second project that she is also engaged in uses records of visits made by African women’s delegations to China during the Cultural Revolution to examine gendered aspects of civil diplomacy.

5:05 pm Film
Yemanjá: Wisdom from the African Heart of Brazil
Location:
Gold Room--University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies, Africana Studies, Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Film Studies, Humanities Center and Consulado do Brazil--New York
See Details

A documentary film about the condomble spiritual culture of Bahia, Brazil. Grounded in strong community and Earth-Based wisdom, this vibrant tradition evolved the ways of enslaved Africans. The film explores Candomblé's history, social challenges and triumphs through the voices of extraordinary women leaders, including the film's narrator Alice Walker.

Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, March 20

2:30 pm Lecture/Lecture Series / Brown Bag
ESC Science and Public Policy Lecture Series: Lessons for the U.S. from Denmark’s District Energy
Location:
BEH 1145
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Pitt Center for Energy
See Details

Niels Malskaer is a Commercial Advisor at the Embassy of Denmark in Washington, D.C., focused on District Energy and Combined Heat and Power, with years of experience in global energy strategy. For the last few years, Niels has been sharing Danish energy experiences with public and private actors across the U.S., through government and commercial activities. He has worked at numerous international organisations, based in Europe as well as the U.S., mainly focused on energy policy analysis, and translating energy planning experiences across the Atlantic.

3:03 pm Lecture
Periodismo y literatura en Jorge Luis Borges”
Location:
William Pitt Union, Dinning Room B
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and the Humanities Center
See Details

This talk will look at links between Borges and mass circulation media, with attention both to his presence in the media (in the cultural supplement of La Prensa, in the Revista Multicolor de los Sábados, in El Hogar and in later participation in newspapers and magazines) and to his reflections on the relations between journalism and literature. Sylvia Saítta is the author of Regueros de tinta: El diario Crítica en la década de 1920 and El escritor en el bosque de ladrillos: Una biografía de Roberto Arlt, the director of the Archivo Histórico de Revistas Argentinas (ahira.com.ar) and the editor of El oficio se afirma, vol. 9 of the Historia crítica de la literatura argentina.

5:00 pm Lecture
Thinking Water with Senegalese Film & Visual Culture
Location:
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning 602
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian, University of Pittsburgh Honors College, Humanities Center, Department of Film Studies and Graduate Program for Cultural Studies
6:00 pm Film
Salam Neighbor
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building, Room 125
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Hello Neighbor
See Details

Hello Neighbor is excited to announce our next community event, a screening of the award-winning documentary, Salam Neighbor, about a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan and the stories of people living there working to rebuild their lives. This event is free and open to the public but we do ask you to RSVP in advance!

In an effort to better understand refugee life, the filmmakers of Salam Neighbor spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, they were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. Their experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.

We recommend at a minimum age 12 and up for this screening.

Link to RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hello-neighbor-presents-salam-neighbor-a-do...

6:30 pm Film
La Tempestad (Mexico)
Location:
G-23 Public Health Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

La Tempestad (Tatiana Huezo, Mexico, 2016)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie

The emotional journeys of two women victimized by corruption and injustice in Mexico and of the love, dignity and resistance that allowed them to survive.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPxXzolGr6Q

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

9:00 pm Lecture
China's Constitutional Changes
Location:
218 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Global Citizen Lab

Wednesday, March 21 until Friday, March 23

10:00 am Conference
THE FUTURE OF BORGES STUDIES
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning--Humanities Center
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Humanities Center and and Honors College
See Details

Co-sponsored by the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, the Center for Latin American Studies, the Faculty Research Support Program of the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, the Humanities Center and the University Honors College.

Alberto Manguel Director, National Library of Argentina
Daniel Balderston Director, Borges Center, University of Pittsburgh
Laura Rosato and Germán Álvarez Co-Directors, Centro Borges
de Documentación, National Library of Argentina
Mariela Blanco Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata-Conicet
Sylvia Saítta Universidad de Buenos Aires-Conicet
M aría Celeste Martín Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Nora Benedict • Alfredo Alonso Estenoz • María Julia Rossi
Leonardo Pitlevnik • Sebastián Urli • Martín Gaspar • David Mundie

A conference to celebrate the new formal agreement for cooperation between the Borges Center of the University of Pittsburgh and the Centro Borges de Documentación of the Biblioiteca Nacional Mariano Moreno, the National Library of Argentina Full information will be available on the websites of the Borges Center (borges.pitt.edu) and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures (hispanic.pitt.edu).

Events will be held at the Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, except
for several workshops on Thursday March 22nd in the Digital Commons of the Hillman Library.

Wednesday, March 21

12:00 pm Lecture
“Vanity, Laziness, and Skepticism Still Possess Me. But I Continue to Fight...”: Tolstoy’s Aesthetic Cure for Doubt
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

From his earliest writing on art to his magisterial treatise What is Art? Tolstoy strenuously opposed the idea that aesthetic pleasure is merely sensuous pleasure, which might vary from person to person. He wanted to secure the objectivity and universality of aesthetic judgment, to identify not only what he or his milieu happened to consider true art, but what all people must consider true art. It was not enough for Tolstoy to say that the poems of the Decadents were not his cup of tea; he wished to say they were false and bad and anyone who liked them a corrupt, befuddled, opium-smoking fool—and to be justified in saying so. Why did Tolstoy object so strongly to the idea that our aesthetic response might be subjective? Why was he so zealous in his rejection of aesthetic subjectivism, when so many other artists, particularly in the later decades of the 19th century, accepted it? I will argue that resisting aesthetic subjectivism was not merely an artistic or political imperative for Tolstoy but an existential one. He saw objective aesthetic judgment as a bulwark against a kind of solipsism into which the very process of making art threatened to thrust him.

1:30 pm Lecture/Panel Discussion
The Shale Dilemma: A Global Perspective on Fracking and Shale Development
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation and Center for Industry Studies
See Details

Book launch and panel discussion. To register, visit https://shale_book_launch.eventbrite.com.

Panelists:
Shanti Gamper-Rabindran, University of Pittsburgh, GSPIA

Reid Frazier
Allegheny Front, StateImpact Pennsylvania, Trump on Earth podcast

Amy Sisk
StateImpact Pennsylvania, 90.5 FM WESA

Book details:
President Trump has forged ahead with the America-First Energy Policy, expanding oil and gas extraction while slashing health and environmental regulations. Other countries e.g. Germany and France eschewed shale altogether. Why do countries make such different energy choices? How can we move forward in balancing the benefits and costs from shale? Join a discussion with Shanti Gamper-Rabindran, associate professor from the University of Pittsburgh and Reid Frazier and Amy Sisk, journalists from StateImpact Pennsylvania. We examine shale issues from across the globe and to our local communities that are hosting shale wells, pipelines, disposal wells, and cracker plants.

Thursday, March 22 until Sunday, April 8

(All day) Festival
2018 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Humanities Center at Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

The mission of the Carnegie Mellon International “Faces” Film Festival is to engage the Pittsburgh community with all-encompassing programming that promotes cultural exchange and expression, and through film, illuminates the local and global ethnic communities which seldom have opportunities to celebrate their artwork and culture on a large public scale. By collaborating with guest filmmakers, arts organizations, and local businesses, the festival creates a platform for these ethnic groups to expose the Pittsburgh community to their cultures, allows attendees to identify and relate to their own origins, and for cinematic artists to engage audiences with their films and dialogues.

Thursday, March 22

12:00 pm Lecture
History Of The Present: New Populism And The Case Of Poland
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center
See Details

Join Tomasz Sawczuk for a discussion of the Polish version of a contemporary illiberal and populist politics. Mr. Sawczuk will present the historical background that has led to the current populist and illiberal developments in Polish politics and remark on the strategic situation of the liberal opposition, with thoughts on both how best to and how best not to respond to the populist agenda and contemporary illiberalism.

Tomasz Sawczuk is a political writer and an editor at the Polish sociopolitical weekly magazine "Kultura Liberalna". A law and philosophy graduate at the University of Warsaw in Poland, he is working there on a doctoral dissertation in philosophy devoted to the pragmatist liberalism of Richard Rorty. Thanks to a grant from The Kościuszko Foundation, he is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Pittsburgh (Department of Philosophy). Subsequently, he will be a visiting scholar at the Indiana University (Department of Political Science). He is the author of an upcoming book on contemporary Polish politics, "Nowy liberalizm. Jak zrozumieć i wykorzystać kryzys III RP" ("New Liberalism. How To Understand And Respond To The Crisis Of The Third Republic Of Poland").

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa Series: Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Success
Location:
Room 4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Education in Ethiopia: Challenges Women Face in the Pursuit of Higher Education

Thursday March 22nd, 2018 - 12 – 1:30 pm Room 4130 WWPH

Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Succes
Some women will do anything to get an education. Embark on a journey of stories that will take you into the heart of a rural Ethiopian woman who strives for an education. Stories that will make you laugh, cry, and be thankful for your own educational journey.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
1968: Framing Radical Politics in Time and Space
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Part of the UCIS series exploring the effects of the hallmark year 1968. More Information TBA.

4:30 pm Lecture
France and Culture
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of European Horizons
See Details

Bordeaux Conservatory professor Jean-Louis Agobet will be in Pittsburgh as a part of NAT 28's French Music and Culture Festival. In this talk, he will speak about the relationship between the Conservatories and Universities in France and the politics of culture in the country.

The session will be in English but questions in both French and English are welcome.

Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1924801574516857/

6:00 pm Lecture
Two Evenings at Pitt
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Hillman Library, PittArts and Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures
See Details

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

6:30 pm Film
Film: Autumn Gem (Rae Chang, 2009)
Location:
Mt. Lebanon Library
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Join us on March 22nd at 6:30 pm for a screening of the 2009 Chinese documentary, Autumn Gem at the Mt. Lebanon Library. Qiu Jin (1875-1907) was a radical women’s rights activist who defied tradition to become the leader of a revolutionary army, as she boldly challenged traditional gender roles and demanded equal rights and opportunities for women.The first female martyr for China’s 1911 Revolution, Qiu Jin is celebrated as a national heroine today.

Light refreshments will be served. Special guest commentator TBA.

Friday, March 23 until Saturday, March 24

10:00 am Conference
Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference

For more information about the conference and call for papers, visit: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

Call for papers: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp/call-for-papers

Friday, March 23

11:30 am Lecture
Keynote Speaker
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Dr. Carlos E. Ponce is the director for Latin America programs at Freedom House. Ponce previously worked as the General Coordinator for the Latin American and Caribbean Network for Democracy, and has been a consultant for a variety of organizations focused on strengthening civil society, developing mechanisms to protect human rights defenders, and solidifying democratic institutions in the region.

Ponce is also a member of the Steering Committee of the World Movement for Democracy, the ISC of the Community of Democracies, and is the General Coordinator of the Latin American and Caribbean Network for Democracy. He received a Ph.D in Law and Policy from Northeastern University, and also holds Master’s degree in Environmental Law from Vermont Law School, a Master of Arts degree in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning from Tufts University, a JD from the Andres Bello Catholic University.

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas

11:30 am Colloquium/Lecture Series / Brown Bag
PITT-CMU EUROPEAN COLLOQUIUM
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of German, Department of Anthropology, Department of History and Carnegie-Mellon University Department of History
See Details

Please join us for the second meeting of the European Colloquium. We envision this colloquium as a space of
interdisciplinary conversation, in which graduate students and faculty from both Pitt and CMU will come
together to discuss current research on European topics.

Our presenter will be Heath Cabot, Asst. Professor of Anthropology, the University of Pittsburgh. Comments
will be offered by Paul Eis, History, CMU.

We are looking forward to an exciting discussion about "The European Refugee Crisis and Humanitarian
Citizenship in Greece" Dr. Cabot’s paper is being pre-circulated. Please contact Iris Matijevic, ESC at
irm24@pitt.edu, to have a copy emailed to you in advance of the colloquium.

Organized as a monthly brown bag event, we hope that everyone will bring not only their lunch, but also their
questions and comments to what will hopefully become an ongoing conversation.

Saturday, March 24

(All day) Conference
Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and U.S. Department of Education
See Details

The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to announce its inaugural, regional one-day conference on Saturday, March 24, 2018. The Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference creates a space for the sharing of ideas and broader intellectual engagement for Africanist faculty, researchers, and graduate students from across the Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes regions. Seeing the need for opportunities for scholarly development and networking among educators and researchers in African Studies outside of the annual meeting of the African Studies Association, we invite Africanists from universities, community colleges, HBCUs, and other academic institutions in the neighboring states of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, Indiana, Michigan, and New York to participate in the conference. The larger goal is to stimulate a regional intellectual community for Africanist scholars and researchers across a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds and institutions.

The keynote speaker for the conference will be Dr. Moses Ochonu, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of History in the Department of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of three books (including Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was a finalist for the 2015 Herskovits prize), numerous articles, and is a frequent public commentator on history and politics in Nigeria and the larger African continent. Co-sponsors for this conference also include the Department of Africana Studies, the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and the U.S. Department of Education.

The conference organizers have limited travel funds available to support conference participants who are more than three hours away from the University of Pittsburgh. If you are interested, please contact Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu to request an application for travel funds.

Registration for the conference is free and breakfast and lunch will be provided. The deadline for conference abstracts is March 1, 2018. To present at the conference, please submit an abstract of 150 to 200 words through the online registration form. Participants will be notified of their acceptance within one week of the abstract deadline. A conference website with the full agenda will also be posted before the conference takes place.

You may register and view program information on the website of the University of Pittsburgh African Studies program: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/africa/content/2018-african-studies-conference

Please direct any questions or concerns to Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu.

2:00 pm Film
Serbian Film Festival
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of Serb National Federation
See Details

2:00 PM: THE PROMISE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 74 minutes
Directed By: Zeljko Mirkovic

In a remote village in the southeast of Serbia something unexpected has happened. All of a sudden, a French family has moved to a poor place deserted by the young. They believe they have found a promised land for growing grapes and winemaking. But they have found only old people in the village, distrusting people with old habits. A new challenge awaited them back home in France – how to persuade sommeliers that superior wine can be made in an unknown region? Can they awake hope and breathe a new life into the old village? This marvelous documentary about winemaking in Serbia won nine international awards so far.

3:30 PM: SERBS ON CORFU
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 99 minutes
Author: Sladjana Zaric

A documentary by Radio Television of Serbia describing one of the most tragic events faced by the Serbian people – the exile of the entire nation, army, and government of Serbia to the island Corfu, Greece during World War I. In order to avoid a capitulation of their country to the Austro-Hungary Empire, the Serbian Government and army (including the civilian population) decide to leave their own country and cross Albania during the dead of winter to reach the Allies at the Adriatic Sea. This was a unique case in world history that an entire nation immigrated to save their lives.

6:00 PM: SANTA MARIA della SALUTE
Release Year: 2016
Runtime: 117 minutes
Directed By: Zdravko Sotra

An enjoyable biographical story about the love between one of the most famous Serbian poets, Laza Kostic, renowned for his sublime poems, and an attractive, educated, charming, and rich young girl, Lenka Dundjerski. Lenka was the daughter of Kostic’s friend, Lazar Dundjerski. She had read Kostic’s poetry before she met him, and he was thirty years older than her. The love affair inspired one of the most beautiful love poems of Serbian and European poetry, Santa Maria della Salute. The movie was one of most popular movies in Serbia in 2016 and 2017.