Week of March 25, 2018 in UCIS

Thursday, March 22 until Sunday, April 8

(All day) Festival
2018 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Humanities Center at Carnegie Mellon University
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The mission of the Carnegie Mellon International “Faces” Film Festival is to engage the Pittsburgh community with all-encompassing programming that promotes cultural exchange and expression, and through film, illuminates the local and global ethnic communities which seldom have opportunities to celebrate their artwork and culture on a large public scale. By collaborating with guest filmmakers, arts organizations, and local businesses, the festival creates a platform for these ethnic groups to expose the Pittsburgh community to their cultures, allows attendees to identify and relate to their own origins, and for cinematic artists to engage audiences with their films and dialogues.

Sunday, March 25

2:00 pm Lecture
The Battle for Dukla Pass
Location:
1500 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pitt Student Slovak Club; Slovak Studies Program
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A life-long expert on the Battle of Dukla Pass, Bill Tarkulich will discuss the breadth of the revered, crucial, protracted, and bloody chapter in Slovaks’ confrontation with Nazi control toward World War II, including in-tended strategy, unintended political and social results, personalities, local citizenry. He weighs in on the effects the disastrous battle had on the Slovak National Uprising. Mr. Tarkulich has published several papers on Rusyn family history, homeland history, and genealogy research methods for most families in Slovakia. Many of his methods have become de-facto standards for research in Slovakia in general and the Carpathian Mountains and border lands specifically. He graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology and went on to earn a grad-uate degree at Northeastern University.

Refreshments will be served

Monday, March 26

12:00 pm Colloquium
Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Humanities Center
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Yoneyama’s third single-authored book, Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes (Duke University Press, 2016), considered the ongoing efforts to bring justice to the Japanese war crimes, the legacy of U.S. military occupation, and the failure of decolonization in the aftermath of World War II. It deployed a method of conjunctive transpacific critique to illuminate the radical challenges the post-1990s redress culture can potentially bring to the still problematic effects of the Cold War knowledge formations.

Lisa Yoneyama is a Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies & Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. She received Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at Stanford University, California (1993). Prior to joining the University of Toronto, she taught Cultural Studies and U.S.-Japan Studies at University of California, San Diego (1992-2011), where she also served as Director of the Program for Japanese Studies (interim, 2008-09) and Critical Gender Studies Program (2009-2011). Her research interests have always centered on the memory politics concerning war and colonialism, issues related to gender and militarism, and the cultural dimensions of transnationalism, neo-colonialism, and nuclearism, as well as the Cold War and post-Cold War U.S. relations with Asia.

3:00 pm Lecture
Feeling of Freedom: Japanese and American Wartime Films on the Liberation of the Philippines, 1943-45
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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This presentation analyzes Japanese and American filmic representations of the liberation of the Philippines during World War II in the Asia-Pacific. Professor Fujitani argues that while the occupations of both these militarized empires disavowed colonialist and cam in the name of freedom and self-determination for all peoples, they were very similar attempts to establish a new and postcolonial form of empire that depended upon producing the feeling that their empires enabled freedom and equality. They talk further explores how the American and Japanese films mobilized the tropes of choice, death, romance, and race to produce images of their empires as spaces of freedom and equality.

Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific).

Much of his past and current research has centred on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues. He is the author of Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996; Japanese version, NHK Books, 1994; Korean translation, Yeesan Press, 2003) and Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Koreans in WWII (UC Press, 2011; Japanese version forthcoming from Iwanami Shoten); co-editor of Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (Duke U. Press, 2001); and editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).

He has held grants and fellowships from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Stanford Humanities Center, Social Science Research Council, Institute for Research in Humanities at Kyoto U, Humanities Research Institute at UC Irvine, University of California President’s Research Fellowship in the Humanities, American Philosophical Society, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard U, and other institutions.

He has served on numerous editorial and institutional boards including for the International Journal of Korean History, Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review, Japanese Studies, University of California Press, Stanford Humanities Center, SSRC, and Association for Asian Studies. He is currently working on a book that assesses the location of the Japanese monarchy in contemporary Japanese understandings and contestations over the meaning of the nation, gender, race, globalization, and the past.

Tuesday, March 27

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag/Panel Discussion
Conversations on Europe - Elections in Italy: A Next Wave for Populism?
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
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In-person or remote participation in this virtual roundtable is possible, and audience questions are encouraged.

For information, contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

3:00 pm Film
Barefoot Doctor Sun Lizhe
Location:
Thornburgh Room, First Floor, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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This documentary film recounts Dr. Sun Lizhe's remarkable experience as a barefoot doctor in rural China and offers a glimpse of China's healthcare condition during and shortly after the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Described as "Chinese Dr. Zhivago" in the film, Sun's distinguished life began from his decision to become a "barefoot doctor" when he was an 18-year-old educated youth from Beijing sent down to the countryside. He had since saved numerous lives by performing difficult surgery when emergency situations arose. For example, he once manually removed a placenta from a peasant women's uterus during her placental dystocia. In villages where medical resources were extremely limited, Sun devoted himself to the healthcare of peasants, performing more than 3000 operations in the cave dwellings of Shaanxi province. In 1974 he was selected by Chairman Mao as one of China's five model "educated youths."

The film directed by Xu Tong will be followed by a Q&A with Dr. Sun Lizhe.

4:00 pm Lecture
Connected Seas: the Baltic Sea in a wider Oceanic World
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History
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Professor North, currently a teaching fellow at UC Santa Barbara, is Chair of Modern History at the Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Director of the Graduate Program “Contact Area Mare Balticum: Foreignness and Integration in the Baltic Region” and Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Training Group “Baltic Borderlands: Shifting Boundaries of Mind and Culture in the Borderlands of the Baltic Sea Region.”

Wednesday, March 28

9:00 am Workshop
Rethinking South-South Cooperation: India and Brazil in the 21st Century
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Center for Latin American Studies
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The University Center for International Studies (UCIS) at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to host the workshop "Rethinking South-South Cooperation: India and Brazil in the 21st Century" on March 28, 2018. Organized as a partnership between the Center for Latin American Studies and the Asian Studies Center, the workshop links with the successful international conference at Renmin University (China) that focused on the trilateral relationships between China, the United States, and Latin America. The "Rethinking South-South Cooperation" workshop will analyze the growing relationship between India and Brazil from a multidisciplinary perspective. More specifically, we are excited to focus on the issues of governance and population management, with specific sessions dedicated to South-South Governance, Mega-Events and Global Repercussions, Urbanization and Megacities, and Policing and Politics. Using India and Brazil as a model, the workshop hopes to consider how comparative politics along a south-south axis can elicit different concerns and tactics than a more traditional global or north/south, colonial comparative model.

4:00 pm Lecture
Hunger Artists: Zen Cooking, Mindful Eating, and Consumer Culture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Religious Studies Department

Thursday, March 29 until Friday, March 30

10:00 am Symposium
John Beverley International Symposium
Location:
University of Pittsburgh: University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Humanities Center, Cultural Studies, University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Science, Bolivian Studies Journal and and Theatre Arts
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John Beverley: International Symposium
University of Pittsburgh – University Club

In recognition of Professor John Beverley’s retirement next year, the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures is hosting an international symposium titled, "JOHN BEVERLEY AND THE URGENCY OF LATIN AMERICANISM IN TIMES OF CONFLICTING GLOBALIZATION". This international symposium is scheduled for March 29-30, 2018, at the University of Pittsburgh – University Club.
http://www.hispanic.pitt.edu/news-story/john-beverley-international-symp...

Thursday, March 29

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Poems, Politics and Litigation againts the U.S. Government
Location:
Barco Law Building, Room 113
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University of Pittsburgh Law School and Center for International Legal Education
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Margaret Randall is a poet, essayist, oral historian, translator, photographer, and social activist. She lived in Latin America for 23 years (in Mexico, Cuba and Nicaragua).

She has published more than 100 books of poetry, prose, and oral history, including numerous books on Cuban, Nicaraguan, and Vietnamese women, and recently Che on My Mind, a feminist reflection on the life and legacy of Che Guevara. Randall has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors for her writings.

In 1984, Randall returned to the United States, but faced deportation under the McCarran Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 based on her writings, which the U.S. Government declared were, “against the good order and happiness of the United States.” After a five year legal battle, she won her case.

Randall will read her poetry and discuss her successful legal battle against deportation with University of Pittsburgh School of Law Professor, Jules Lobel, who participated in her legal fight.

Sponsored by: Center for Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh; Center for International Legal Education, University of Pittsburgh Law School; University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

2:00 pm Lecture
European Climate Politics and Activism from Local to Global
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
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European climate and energy policies have been leading the world for several years, and climate activism has long been visible in many European cities and campuses. So what’s new in EU climate policy and activism? What’s next for EU climate politics in the age of the Trump Administration’s global gaslighting?

Funded through the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
Book Launch for Zouping Revisited
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of Political Science and Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
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China has undergone dramatic change in its economic institutions in recent years, but surprisingly little change politically. Somehow, the political institutions seem capable of governing a vastly more complex market economy and a rapidly changing labor force. One possible explanation, examined in Zouping Revisited, is that within the old organizational molds there have been subtle but profound changes to the ways these governing bodies actually work. The authors take as a case study the local government of Zouping County and find that it has been able to evolve significantly through ad hoc bureaucratic adaptations and accommodations that drastically change the operation of government institutions.
Zouping has long served as a window into local-level Chinese politics, economy, and culture. In this volume, top scholars analyze the most important changes in the county over the last two decades. The picture that emerges is one of institutional agility and creativity as a new form of resilience within an authoritarian regime.

6:00 pm Lecture
A City of Consumption: The Woodblock Print Industry in Edo, Japan
Location:
Theater, Carnegie Museum of Art
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Mitsubishi Electric Power Products and The Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania
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Dr. Brenda Jordan will detail the process for making ukiyo-e wood block prints and the publishing industry that gave rise to these works of art that were accessible to the public. After the lecture, the Hiroshima exhibit will be open to the attendees. This event will serve as a kickoff event for the Hiroshima exhibit, which will be open from March 24 to July 8. Join the Japan America Society of Pennsylvania for this free evening. Space is limited so please register today — japansocietypa.org/events.

Dr. Jordan is the Director of the University of Pittsburgh National Coordinating Site for the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) and the Japan Studies Coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh Asian Studies Center. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Kansas specializing in 19th Century Japanese art history.

Friday, March 30

3:00 pm Lecture
Soldiers and Kings
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Studies Center
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Jason de Leon has been involved in an analog photoethnographic project focused on documenting the daily lives of Honduran smugglers who profit from transporting undocumented migrants across Mexico. He will discuss the relationship between transnational gangs and the human smuggling industry and will outline the complicated role that photography plays as a field method and data source in this violent and challenging ethnographic context.

5:00 pm Film
A Violent Prosecutor
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and and the Film Studies Program
See Details

A Violent Prosecutor (2016) is directed by Lee Il-hyung. A recent addition to the surge of political dramas in Korean cinema today, this film follows an unyielding prosecutor who, framed and convicted for murder, teams up with a con artist to catch the real murderer from behind bars.

Pizza and refreshments provided.