Events

 

The following events draw interdisciplinary audiences and help forge networks relating to our center's five concentrations: Ecology and Sustainability, Politics and Economy, Cultural Dynamics, Peace, Conflict & Security and Heath & Well-being.

Tuesday, February 20

Karuppi
The Dark Woman
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Ponni Arasu
Location:
Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council along with Department of Theatre Arts and Gender Sexuality & Women's Studies Program

The play, originally created in Tamil, is a collection of writing by and about Tamil speaking women who traveled across oceans from Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka for work or were displaced by war. The script consists of poetry, traditional folk songs, excerpts from short stories and government documents. The stories date back to the early 19th Century to the present day. While translating the play in English, the Marapachchi team found that the play works on many registers. While the play is about Tamil-speaking women, the incidents and stories may resonate with other contexts and histories.

Karuppi is a production of Marapachchi Theatre, a feminist theatre collective based in Madras, India.

The play is mostly in English with some Tamil sections. Written translation of Tamil will be provided.

Ponni Arasu is a queer feminist researcher, historian, and activist from Tamilnadu, India. She is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto and holds a Masters in History from Jawaharlal Nehru University, as well as a Bachelor degree in Law. Ponni has worked on issues related to sexuality, labour, law and caste in South Asia as an activist, researcher and legal practitioner. She has worked in multiple capacities as an activist and theatre practitioner in northern and eastern Sri Lanka for the past twelve years. Her last major project was to initiate the creation of an archive of oral history on women in social movements in different parts of India in the 1970s. This project was commissioned by the Indian Association of Women Studies and Zubaan Books. Her PhD research addresses the history of Tamil Nadu in Southern India (1950-70) studying the formation of publics from a gender perspective.

Thursday, February 22 to Saturday, February 24

Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Time:
8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Thursday, February 22

Justice and the Global City
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Joe Hoover
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Cities in Transformation Initiative
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Hoover is a lecturer in Political Theory in the School of Politics and International Politics at Queen Mary University of London. He has worked previously at City University London, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also received his PhD. For the past several years he has focused on the use of human rights by diverse political movements in order to take the measure of both their limitations and their promise for a more radically democratic world. His latest research project rethinks questions of global justice by focusing on the injustices experienced in contemporary urban life to develop an argument in favor of more inclusive and democratic cities. Dr. Hoover's work on the human right to housing and the right to the city have led to collaborations with housing rights groups in the USA and the UK, including the FOCUS E15 campaign in East London. He is also the co-convener and chair of the BISA Ethics and World Politics Working Group.

Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Terje Tvedt
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

A Discussion on the Iran Nuclear Deal with Former Ambassador Dennis Jett
Presented by the Global Affairs Club
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dennis Jett, Professor and Former Ambassador
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Pitt Global Affairs Club
Contact:
Noah Coco
Contact Email:
nmc57@pitt.edu

Professor Dennis Jett is a distinguished diplomat and academic, having served as U.S. ambassador to Peru and Mozambique under the Clinton administration. His experience and expertise focus on international relations, foreign administration, and American foreign policy.

Snacks Provided.

Black History Month Performance
Performance Music: Theater for the 21st Century
Time:
7:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodess Jones, Idris Acakamoor and the Pyramids
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Friday, February 23 to Sunday, February 25

Global Health Mini Course
1 Credit Mini Course
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University
Contact:
Veronica Dristas
Contact Email:
dristas@pitt.edu

With each emerging infectious disease, the interconnectedness of populations around the globe becomes more pronounced. Diseases not only affect the health of communities, but they have a profound impact on political, economic, and social stability within countries and regions. This course engages the interdisciplinary nature of global health by approaching the issue through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) developed by the United Nations. The SDGs range in focus from good health and well-being to gender equality to clean water and sanitation to affordable, clean energy. By engaging the ways that health has a stake in these goals, the course will bring the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and CMU to understand and address the issue surrounding global health from a myriad of perspectives and avenues. With a project-based focus, the course will assist students in engaging and impacting their local community though a global issue.

To register before January 26 (add/drop) PS 1903-1010 (10182). To register after January 26 please contact Veronica Dristas, Associate Director.

Friday, February 23

What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Time:
9:30 am
Presenter:
Ruth Mostern (University of Pittsburgh) and Abigail Owen (Carnegie Mellon University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Time:
5:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

Saturday, February 24

Teach Africa Workshop—K-16 Educators, Indigenous Wisdom and Culture
Time:
(All day)
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with School of Education
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Saturday, February 24, 2017, 9am-3:30pm

Join us at the University of Pittsburgh for the Teach Africa Workshop – Indigenous Wisdom and Culture on February 24, 2017. Learn how to use free multi-media curriculum units to Strengthen the teaching of African Studies in your classroom.

Breakout sessions will include discussions and demonstrations on integrating African Studies material into your classroom. Several examples are listed: #Me too: Connecting gender issues from Ethiopia to America, Through an African Lens: Positive Racial Identity Development, Best Practices for Integrating Languages Spoken in Africa, and even Incorporating Indigenous Ways of Knowing into STEAM Classrooms.
Speakers include experts from the Carnegie Museum of History, Fulbright Hays Educators who designed cutting edge multi-media Ethiopian curriculum units, and in the field language teachers.
All teachers and administrators are welcome whether you are an expert on teaching Africa or this is the first time you have even considered it.
Act 48 credits will be available to interested attendees with
Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register with Anna-Maria.

Contact Anna-Maria Karnes at 412-624-8143 or awk19@pitt.edu if you have any questions.

Creative Survival, Creative Performance: Perusing the New Narrative
Student Performance
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodessa Jones and Pitt students
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.

This is the culmination of a month of workshops with Pitt students exploring the creative process and utilizing autobiographical history as a vehicle for performance. Using movement, text, text-writing, vocalizations, theatre games, memory exercises, autobiographical musings, and storytelling, Rhodessa Jones will demonstrate her use of "art as social activism" to create social change.

Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Time:
3:45 pm
Presenter:
Nicholas Breyfogle (Ohio State University), Terje Tvedt (University of Bergen), and Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

For more information, please see: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/rivers-symposium.

Thursday, March 1

Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

Dusan Makavejev’s Love Affair provides us with an example of cinematic reflexivity, which can be defined as any technique that reminds the viewer that he or she is watching a film. Reflexivity foregrounds the fact that film meaning is a function of a set of codes with ideological implications rather than a transparent reflection of reality. Reflexivity can be achieved through intertextuality, exaggeration of cinematic conventions or conspicuous narration that reminds us of the author’s mark on the text. These techniques are all in evidence in Love Affair, whose textual heterogeneity calls into question the earnestness of cinematic (including socialist) realism as well as the official ideologies of state communism. As Thomas Elsaesser notes, Love Affair juxtaposes three sites of meaning: “the liberating intimacy of a sexual relationship…, the public world of abstract didacticism and cold rationality…, [and] the memory of the Russian Revolution and Tito’s national liberation war”. (Elsaesser, European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood, p. 322) Our understanding of Makavejev’s view of 1960s Yugoslavian society depends on our interpretation of the ironic and tragic relationship between these three sites of meaning. (Alex Lykidis, "Love Affair," Critical Commons)

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Time:
4:45 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Early Works (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Vladimir Padunov, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Discussants: Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Saturday, March 3

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Tuesday, March 6

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Authors Under Authoritarianism
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Jacques Bromberg
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

This reading group for educators explores literary texts from a global perspective. Content specialists offer stimulating presentations of the work and its context, and together we brainstorm innovative pedagogical practices for incorporating the text and its themes into the curriculum. After a successful partnership with City of Asylum and their authors-in-residence in the fall, our series continues this spring with the theme of literature and authoritarianism. At this session, Prof. Jacques Bromberg (Classics) will lead a discussion of Sophocles' Antigone.

Monday, March 12

Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Tuesday, March 13

Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Time:
4:30 pm
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Thursday, March 15

Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Michael White
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Michael White, Professor of Population Studies, Brown University
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Michael White is the Robert E. Turner Distinguished Professor of Population Studies at Brown University, where he is also Professor of Sociology and Director of the initiative in Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences. White's research covers a wide array of topics within the broad area of migration and population distribution: from urban residential segregation, to rural-urban migration in developing societies, to contemporary international migration and immigrant assimilation. White's publications reflect his combination of sociology, demography, and public policy interests.

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

8 Borders, 8 Days
Hello Neighbor Documentary Film Series
Time:
8:00 pm
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor

A single mother shows us the consequences of closing America’s doors to families fleeing war. With no answer to her application for resettlement in the US, and every other path to safety closed off, a smuggler’s raft to Europe was the only way out. 8 Borders, 8 Days is her story; the intimate details of why a fiercely-determined mother is willing to risk her children’s lives for a better future and an immersive experience of their eight-day journey to safety.

Friday, March 16

Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Global Studies Center Faculty and Staff
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

This is the last installment of a 4-part Global Studies Center series to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Saturday, March 17

Let's Explore Africa Quiz Competition!
Road to 2018 National Championship
Time:
10:30 am
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Let's Explore Africa Quiz Competition for 4th-7th grade students! 4th-7th grade @10:30am, 8th to 12th grade @11:30am!

Register at www.letsexploreafrica.net!

Purpose and Mission-
Let's Explore Africa is a quiz competition about Africa. Africa, the second largest continent in the world and home to over a billion people is perhaps the most misunderstood region on the planet. To some it is a country, to many it is an area plagued with diseases, and to a few it is just a safari. Dr. Sandra Frempong, an accountant and educator wrote books and created the quiz competition to help broaden people's knowledge about the continent. The quiz competition started in 2014. Contestants have thoroughly enjoyed playing the fun trivia and learn more about Africa as they navigate the continent from Cape Town to Casablanca. Players answer multiple choice questions at various difficulty levels. Questions highlights geography, entertainment, people, literature, symbols, resources, etc.

Eligibility- The competition is open to the general public, admission is free and the minimum age to compete is ten (10). There are tournaments for K-12 and college students. We strongly encourage and welcome schools to participate. Eligible k-12 students will compete at grade levels as follows
Level 1 = (4th - 6th graders)
Level 2 = (7th - 9th graders)
Level 3 = (10th - 12th graders)

Quiz Rules
1) The competition will be offered in two rounds.
2) Student can compete as a team or as individual for the preliminary round.
3) In Round 1 (first 20-30 trivia questions) student/s with the most correct answers will advance to Round 2 (final).
4) In the final round, the match-up will be team versus team or individual versus individual. Therefore, if only one team remains, the group members from that team shall select a delegate who will compete against other 'individual' students. However, should the reverse be the case, that one student will have the option to compete alone against the remaining teams.
5) Round Two (second 40-60 trivia questions): Student/s with the most correct answers is the winner.
6) If there is a tie, a tiebreaker question will be offered.

How much do YOU know about Africa? You are invited to join us in this fun, educational quiz competition. Come and test your knowledge. Be a contestant!
Let’s Explore Africa!

Monday, March 19

Critical Research on Africa
China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center

China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway

Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University

Professor Jamie Monson became interested in Africa when she served as an agriculture volunteer for the Peace Corps in rural Kenya in 1980. She then completed her PhD in African History at UCLA, and took her first teaching position at Carleton College in 1991. In 2015, she accepted a position as a Professor of African History in the Department of History and Director of African Studies at Michigan State University. Monson’s early research focus was on agricultural and environmental history of southern Tanzania, and she has also worked on anti-colonial warfare in German East Africa. In the late 1990s, she began a new research project on the history of the TAZARA railway, built with Chinese development aid in Tanzania and Zambia in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Africa’s Freedom Railway, was published by Indiana University Press in 2011.

Most recently, Monson has been studying the history of China-Africa relations (and learning Chinese), and frequently performs research in China. Her new project is a study of technology transfer in the history of Chinese development assistance to Africa. A second project that she is also engaged in uses records of visits made by African women’s delegations to China during the Cultural Revolution to examine gendered aspects of civil diplomacy.

Tuesday, March 20

Salam Neighbor
Hello Neighbor Documentary Film Series
Time:
8:00 pm
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor
Contact:
Sandra Prigg-Monteverde
Contact Email:
sjp89@pitt.edu

In an effort to better understand refugee life, [the filmmakers] spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, [they] were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. [Their] experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.

Thursday, March 22

1968: Framing Radical Politics in Time and Space
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Elaine Carey, Purdue University, and Felix Germain, University of Pittsburgh
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and Open to the Public

Part of the UCIS series exploring the effects of the hallmark year 1968. More Information TBA.

Two Evenings at Pitt
Exploring the work of Mohsin Hamid
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Elizabeth Fielder, English doctoral students
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

Monday, April 2

Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Tuesday, April 3

1968: The Year that Rocked Pittsburgh
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with University Honors College

Presented by Emily Ruby or the Heinz History Center. Part of the Global Legacies of 1968 Series, sponsored by the University Honors College.

After Spring
Hello Neighbor Documentary Film Series
Time:
8:00 pm
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Sandra Prigg-Monteverde
Contact Email:
sjp89@pitt.edu

With the Syrian conflict now in its seventh year, millions of people continue to be displaced. AFTER SPRING is the story of what happens next. By following two refugee families in transition and aid workers fighting to keep the camp running, viewers will experience what it is like to live in Zaatari, the largest camp for Syrian refugees. With no end in sight for the conflict or this refugee crisis, everyone must decide if they can rebuild their lives in a place that was never meant to be permanent.

Wednesday, April 4

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Jeanette Jouili
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session we will read Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie and hear from Pitt Prof. Jeanette Jouili (Religious Studies).

Thursday, April 5

Two Evenings at Pitt
Exploring the work of Viet Thanh Nguyen
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Gayle Rogers and English students
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

Friday, April 6

Pitt/Penn State Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium
Time:
(All day)
Location:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Elaine Linn
Contact Email:
eel58@pitt.edu

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.

A wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community are encouraged. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.
Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Center for Global Studies' website.

**Abstracts Due March 2nd**

Submit abstracts here: https://goo.gl/p6DiQR

Students should contact Elaine Linn at eel58@pitt.edu for more information or visit the GSC website.

Saturday, April 7

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Tuesday, April 10

Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Time:
4:30 pm
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Friday, April 13

Critical Research on Africa
Healing Communities: The Convergence of Environment, Slavery, and Spirituality in the African-Atlantic World
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Ras Michael Brown
Location:
3800 WWPH, Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Healing Communities: The Convergence of Environment, Slavery, and Spirituality in the African-Atlantic World

Friday April 13, 2018, 2:00 – 4:00 PM, 4130 WWPH

Ras Michael Brown, PhD, Department of History, Southern Illinois University

Dr. Ras Michael Brown holds a joint appointment in History and Africana Studies and teaches courses on World History, the African Diaspora, the Atlantic World, and Religion. He researches the religious and environmental cultures of African-descended people throughout the African-Atlantic Diaspora with particular attention given to the cultures of West-Central Africans and their descendants in the United States South. His book, African-Atlantic Cultures and the South Carolina Lowcountry (Cambridge University Press, 2012), examines perceptions of the natural world in the religious ideas and practices of African-descended communities in the Lowcountry from the colonial period into the twentieth century. African-Atlantic Cultures and the South Carolina Lowcountry has been awarded the 2013 Albert J. Raboteau Book Prize for the Best Book in Africana Religions by the Journal of Africana Religions. Professor Brown's current projects include articles on the diverse kinds of encounters maintained by African-descended people with Catholic and Protestant Christianity, the contested and convergent meanings of the natural environment among enslaved people and enslavers in the South Carolina Lowcountry, and the special--though often overlooked--significance of nature spirits in African-Atlantic religious cultures. Additionally, his new book project explores the relationships between people and nature spirits in expanding the cultivation of "Atlantic" crops in Africa and the Diaspora and in developing ties to the spiritual landscapes of the Americas from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century.

Saturday, April 14

2018 Islamic Studies Research Symposium
Historical & Modern Experiences of Muslims in the World
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Duquesne University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Consortium for Christian-Muslim Dialogue (CCMD) at Duquesne University
Contact:
Elaine Linn
Contact Email:
eel58@pitt.edu

CERIS is hosting a symposium to highlight faculty and student research and to celebrate 15 years since inception. The day will include both faculty and student panels along with a keynote speaker. Presentations will be organized along the following themes:
Social Change
Cultural & Artist Representation
Policies and International Politics
Theology, Doctrine, and Practice
Emerging Economies and Technologies

Tuesday, April 17

1968: What Have We Learned
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Louis Picard, James Cook, Jae-Jae Spoon, Michael Goodhart, Scott Morgenstern, Nancy Condee
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Jae-Jae Spoon
Contact Email:
spoonj@pitt.edu

Friday, April 20 to Saturday, April 21

Moot ICC
Time:
9:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
Pitt Law School
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education

This competition introduces high school students to international law. Students read a case written by law students, write memorials, and argue before judges.

Friday, April 27

UCIS Graduation Celebration
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom, O'Hara Student Center
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

Students from all UCIS centers graduating in Spring and Summer 2018 are invited with their families to join this UCIS wide ceremony celebrating their completion of the certificate or BPHIL/IAS.

Tuesday, May 1

CCA International Marketing Competition
Time:
12:00 pm
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
4126485085
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

The Global Studies Center and the International Business Center work with high school language and social sciences teachers to introduce international business concepts to students through an international marketing competition. It culminates in an interscholastic competition hosted by the Global Studies Center and the IBC at Pitt, where students present their marketing plans in front of fellow competitors and a panel of judges from the academic and business communities, as well as answer audience questions. The teams that win first, second and third place in the final each receive awards recognizing their hard work.

Saturday, May 5

Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

Monday, June 25 to Friday, July 20

Pennsylvania Governor's School for Global and International Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29

2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers
Time:
8:30 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Business Center
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4176487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Make college more affordable for your high school students—and help them grow as global citizens and 21st century professional—while earning ACT 48 professional development credits.

The College in High School program and the University Center for International Studies will host a summer institute for secondary educators interested in teaching globally focused courses that offer transferable college credit to students at their high school. Courses in which you can obtain certification and training may include:

Intermediate French I-II
Intermediate German I-II
Intermediate Spanish I-II
Latin Intermediate Prose and Verse
Western Civilization II
World Politics
Imperial Russia

Courses will be aligned with Pennsylvania Core and Academic Standards (for social studies) or ACTFL performance standards (for world languages).

The 2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers is funded through generous support from the Longview Foundation for Education in World Affairs and International Understanding (https://longviewfdn.org/).

For more information and to apply, visit chs.pitt.edu/sipt.

Content Below List of Sections: