Past Workshops

Spring 2017

The Syrian Refugee Crisis: Teaching the Stories Behind the Statistics

Date/ Time: Saturday, March 18, 2017, 10:00AM - 3:00PM
Location: College of Business Administration, Sennott Square (Oakland) University of Pittsburgh 

The Syrian refugee crisis is provoking timely discussions on human rights, immigration, and national security. How do we broach these issues in the classroom, make them accessible to our students, and offer impactful, yet sensitive, lessons? In this workshop, Mina Hogsett, a third-year doctoral student in Social and Comparative Analysis in Education at the University of Pittsburgh, and Ashley Davis, MEd and Manager of Educational Services at Snapology, will take a global perspective on the crisis and discuss pedagogical approaches for cultural competency. Mina spent this past summer interviewing teenage refugees in Germany. The Syrian teenagers were mostly male, and had arrived unaccompanied by parents or other family. After discussing the historical and social contexts of the war in Syria with workshop participants, and conducting a comparative analysis of the refugee situation in Europe and the U.S., Mina will share some themes from the interview narratives and ideas for classroom projects and activities. Register here.

Contact Lisa Bromberg with questions. This workshop will precede a symposium on March 22 and March 27-29 entitled Taking Refuge, organized by Theater Arts, GSC, CERIS, Classics, and the Humanities Center. Taking Refuge features lunch and evening play readings, film screenings, and faculty speakers on the impossible choices faced by Syrian citizens. For more information, contact Lisa Bromberg.


Teaching for Global Competence and Global Citizenship Seminar

Dates/Times:
March 25, 9:00AM-4:00PM
March 26, 9:00AM-2:00PM

This course is designed to help practitioners working in the K-12 environment strategically plan for educational opportunities that will enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become not only competitive and successful workers in the global marketplace, but also informed and responsible citizens able to address complex global issues. Course participants will: •Learn about international and global education as a field of study and its current status in U.S. public education •Learn about online, local, and national resources to help them plan curriculum that is more global in content and orientation •Learn about possibilities and challenges for schools that want to integrate international and global education into their educational offerings •Develop lesson plans, programs or strategic plans to use in their own practice •Have the opportunity to network and learn from colleagues in other districts

The course is open to and welcomes teachers at all levels (with a greater emphasis on practices for grades 9-12), and from all departments. It is also highly recommended for school administrators. This seminar is free for participants. ACT 48 credit, parking, and meals are all provided. Dr. Marzia Cozzolino DiCicco, Global Studies Center Associate, will lead the course. Registration is limited (25 max) and required. To register click here. Dinner, parking and materials will be provided. Please contact Lisa Bromberg with any questions.

 

Lion Attacking a Dromedary: Using Physical Objects to Teach About Neutralizing Stereotypes

Date/Time: Thursday, February 2, 2017, 4:30PM-7:00PM

This exciting teacher workshop is a joint effort between the Global Studies Center and the Carnegie Museums. Formerly known as the “Arab Courier,” Pittsburgh’s arguably most well-known diorama is being re-named “Lion Attacking a Dromedary” and moved from the second floor of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to the museum entry. This move represents a re-interpretation of the work—no longer considered “natural” and biological history, the diorama is now understood to reflect racialist stereotypes of the Arab world. Museums have long been institutions that categorize people, objects, and history. The re-positioning of “Arab Courier” is an opportunity to talk to our students about how to think critically about the presentation of objects around them.

In this workshop, Dr. Erin Peters of the University of Pittsburgh and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History will introduce participants to the background and implications of the diorama’s move. Following dinner and discussion in Posvar, we will head over to the museum with Dr. Gretchen Bender of Pitt’s Department of History of Art and Architecture to view the diorama along with other physical objects. Dr. Bender will lead the group in pedagogical activities that can be used in the classroom the next day, and provide suggestions for how to use physical objects as teaching tools even when a museum trip is not possible. Parking, Act 48 credit, and dinner will all be provided. Register here.

This workshop follows a day-long symposium on “Lion Attacking a Dromedary,” sponsored by Pitt’s Year of Diversity and the Carnegie Museums. The symposium is free and open to the public. More information about the symposium can be found here.

Please contact Lisa Bromberg with your questions.

 

Perspectives for a Diverse America Teaching Institute

Date: February 11, 2017 
Location: University of Pittsburgh

The Global Studies Center is excited to sponsor a full-day Teaching Institute on using an anti-bias framework to teach about human rights and global issues in the grades 6-12 classroom. Perspectives for a Diverse America is a K-12, literacy-based, anti-bias curriculum that grew out of the Teaching Tolerance program. It marries social justice content with the rigor of the Common Core State Standards. The curriculum includes a central text anthology, a collection of literacy strategies, and a series of writing and performance tasks for teachers to choose from, allowing for maximum flexibility, customization and differentiation.

The trainer, Ms. Emily Chiariello, is the chief architect of Perspectives and principal author of the Teaching Tolerance anti-bias framework. She has two decades of experience as a classroom teacher and curriculum designer, particularly in urban schools and settings. Each participant will leave the Institute having: 1.) created an online account with Perspectives for a Diverse America; 2.) used the principles of "backward design" to develop effective units of study; 3.) applied anti-bias standards to their own practice; 4.) identified specific texts they can integrate into their existing curriculum; 5.) developed essential questions to guide learning about human rights; 6.) selected a variety of literacy strategies to use across disciplines; and 7.) designed writing tasks and performance assessments. Curricular materials from Teaching Tolerance will be provided, along with Act 48 credit hours, parking on Pitt's campus, and meals. 6-12 educators and school administrators are welcome to register here. Contact Lisa Bromberg with any questions.

 

Fall 2016

Global Educators' Forum

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 4, 5:00 pm
Location: 4217 Posvar Hall, 230 S. Bouquet Street
Sponsored by: Global Studies Center  
Cost: Free
Contact: Lisa Bromberg
Contact Email: lrb62@pitt.edu
The Global Educators' Forum meets twice a year to discuss developing and implementing Global Studies-related programming and curriculum in schools, classrooms, and departments. This open meeting is intended for all educators--including, for example, teachers, administrators, pre-service teachers, post-secondary instructors, and School of Education faculty. Please join us to share your experiences with Global Education programs, learn about available resources, and continue to brainstorm ways of incorporating international and global education components into the curriculum. Dinner, parking, and Act 48 hours are provided, and online access will also be available. Please use the link to register.

 

Pittsburgh Housing Summit Teacher Workshop and Call for K-12 Artwork

Pittsburgh has recently been named a “most livable city.” But growing numbers of residents ask, “livable for whom?” It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the growing divide between two Pittsburghs—one affluent, professional, and largely white, and the other low-income people with long-term roots in the region, largely people of color. Such patterns of growth, rising inequality, increased economic and racial segregation, and displacement of poor minority residents is the direct result of the global marketplace. Around the world, inequalities are exacerbated. And around the world, people are coming together to resist their displacement from their homes and communities.

The Housing Summit (November 10-12) is a joint effort by the Global Studies Center, Pitt faculty, community leaders, and international experts. Together we will learn about and discuss the global and local forces affecting people’s access to affordable housing, and the efforts to address them. A series of public lectures, panels, workshops, and cultural events will facilitate learning and networking aimed at highlighting this issue on the public and policy agenda while advancing new thinking and community organization that can help Pittsburgh residents realize their human right to housing. Global Studies Center Faculty Fellow Professor Jackie Smith, whose research focuses on social movement responses to globalization, is coordinating the initiative.

How Should We Teach about the Fight for Affordable Housing – in Pittsburgh, across the United States, and around the World? 

October 26, 6:00-8:00 PM, Posvar 4217
What role can teachers play in helping students understand these issues, and work toward positive change? In anticipation of the housing summit, Professor Roger Rouse of the University of Pittsburgh, together with Carl Redwood, Chair of the Hill District Consensus Group and long-time housing activist, will be offering a workshop specifically tailored to the curricular and pedagogical needs of the 6-12 educator. Participants are asked to complete the short preparatory readings found here prior to the workshop. Dinner, parking, and Act 48 hours will be provided. Please register here by October 24. Address questions to Lisa Bromberg or Veronica Dristas.

What can students of all ages do to participate in the Housing Summit? Students’ perspectives and talents uniquely encourage conversations about diverse experiences of home, place, belonging, and community. Their understanding of gentrification and displacement resonate strongly with scholars and experts. Knowing this, we invite submissions of art and poetry from local residents on these themes. A committee will select submissions for inclusion in the Summit program, and there will be a competition for youth, with awards in primary, middle, and high school categories. Please submit work to housingsummit@pitt.edu by October 31, 2016. Note that we can only accept word processor files or camera-ready art in other formats such as PDF, JPEG, etc. If you have any questions, please email housingsummit@pitt.edu
Youth submissions: Please be sure to include the name of your school and your grade level.

 

Global Issues Through Literature: Multicultural Societies
The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Presenter: Lisa Bromberg
Location: 4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by: Global Studies Center along with Department of English
Cost: Free
Contact: Lisa Bromberg
Contact Email: lrb62@pitt.edu

Please join us for the second session of this year’s Global Issues through Literature series. All educators are welcome, and previous attendance is not necessary. We will be discussing the novel The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears by Dinaw Mengestu (2007). This novel explores the life of an Ethiopian refugee living in multicultural Washington, D.C. The discussion will be led by University of Pittsburgh English Professor Gayle Rogers, who will frame the novel’s social and historical context and discuss how it can be used in the classroom to teach such global competency skills as empathy, intercultural dialogue and understanding, and a comprehension of global history and society. Books, dinner, parking and Act 48 hours are all provided free of charge. Web access will also be available. To register, click here. Please register by October 28. For more information, including instructions for joining us online, contact Veronica Dristas. 


Pittsburgh’s World Language Connections Day

Date/Tiime: November 8, 2016, 8am-2pm
Location: Fox Chapel Area High School 

Fox Chapel Area High School is proud to announce this year's Pittsburgh World Language Connection Day. This is a great opportunity for those who teach world and classical languages, ESL, social studies, music, art, and all others who are interested in fostering greater community connections in order to enhance their global offerings. Bring along your principals, curriculum directors, and administrators to learn more about how to enhance your school's international programs through meaningful and fun community connections. For more information, see the schedulewebsite, and registration form.

Spring 2016

Teacher Forum on Internationalizing the Classroom

Teacher Forum on Internationalizing the K-12 Classroom. Enter your project or lesson(s) into the competition to show us how you engage students in global awareness, inspire cross-cultural competence, and prepare students for the 21st century OR register as a participant to learn from other educators and teaching professionals.

The forum will provide educators, either as an individual participant or as a team of two, with the opportunity to present a project or lesson with a regional or global focus that they have used in the classroom. The project or lesson should focus on one or more of the following items: build understanding and awareness of other cultures, analyze multiple perspectives, communicate effectively across diverse groups, or take action on an international or global issue. Teams consisting of an in-service and a pre-service teacher are particularly encouraged to attend.

Global Issues Through Literature: Migration, Gentrification, and Displacement

Thursday, February 4, March 3, April 7, and TBA for the May date
5:00 pm - 8:00pm

4217  Wesley W. Posvar Hall

How do people deal with the challenges of moving across borders, seeing others move into the places where they live, and perhaps having to move elsewhere as a result? What is the relationship between these different kinds of moving and the ways that people experience them? And what factors are most significant in shaping such relationships and experiences

In our workshop, we will explore these questions and others that they generate while reading the following novels: Hopes and Other Dangerous Pursuits, Enrique's Journey, Americanah, and Them. Books will be provided for free.                 

Linking the World Beyond Your Classroom with Web 2.0 Tools

Saturday, March 5, 2016
9:00am - 2:00pm
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
University of Pittsburgh

This is an exciting time to be an educator. Knowledge is becoming accessible to more and more people. This includes students in the classroom. With the use of technology, students are no longer limited to a text book or video to learn. A culmination of world knowledge is literally at their fingertips. One of the challenges in doing this si figuring out what to use and how to use it. With the internet, there seems to be an information overload at times that leaves a teacher tired and confused. This workshop is going to address how technology can enhance your classroom pedagogy. 

To register click here. For further information contact Veronica Dristas, Assistant Director of Outreach for the Global Studies Center at dristas@pitt.edu.

Muslims in a Global Context: Muslims In America

Friday, March 18, 2016  6:00pm - 9:00pm
Saturday March 19, 2016 8:30am - 6:15pm
Sunday, March 20, 2016 8:30am - 12:00pm

2400 Sennott Square (210 South Bouquet Street)
University of Pittsburgh

A Brief Overview 

This weekend-course is part of a series organized by regions around the world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community. The series seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim community around the world. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, and our partners at institutions around the world, the mini-course series seeks to have students, and all attendees, gain an understanding of the religious, cultural, economical and political influences of Muslims in a global context.  

For Non-Student Attendees:

All K-12 Educators are welcome and the weekend-course is free for non-students, but registration is required for everyone. Please click here and visit the registration section for more information. If participants attend the whole course, 12 Act credit hours will be granted.

CERIS Curriculum Development Grants

July 1,2015- June 30, 2016

The CERIS Curriculum Development Grants Program is designed to enable faculty members from CERIS institutions to pursue curricular development and enhancement projects related to Islamic Studies. Islamic Studies is understood, as expressed in the CERIS mission statement, to encompass many languages, literatures, and disciplines; and extends from the 7th century to the present, and across broad geographical areas of the world.

Eligibility

 Full-time and part time faculty members of CERIS institutions are eligible to submit a proposal. Only one Curriculum Development Grants award is permitted per institution per fiscal year (July 1 to June 30).

Amount of Grant

 Each year $2,000 will be made available. Requests for funding may be made for any level, though smaller requests may be more likely to be funded. Funds must be used within one year of the award date.

Curriculum Development and Enhancement

- Library resources - print, electronic, visual media
- Guest speakers - must be advertized and open to other CERIS members
- Field visits by faculty or students
- Attendance at a conference or workshop

For more information visit the CERIS website.

Engaging Students in International Issues: The Choices Approach

Saturday, February 6, 2016, 8:30am- 3:30pmChoices Program Workshop Flyer
University Center for International Studies
University of Pittsburgh

Cost: $145 per person. First 15 people to register receive discounted rate of $95. Price includes two units ($78 value), lunch, 7-hour certificate of attendance, and all workshop materials. A limited number of scholarships are available for pre-service teachers (contact Mimi Stephens at maureen_stephens@brown.edu).

Who Should Attend: History, civics, geography, government and other social studies teachers, as well as Humanities teachers, are the target audience. Materials are appropriate for grades 7-12.

During the workshop, you will:

  • Be introduced to the Choices Program’s award-winning resources and approach to teaching about contested international issues;
  • Examine and work with the Choices units China on the World Stage: Weighing the U.S. Response and The Limits of Power: The United States in Vietnam (provided);
  • Network with exemplary colleagues in social studies education from across the state.

More information and registration is available on the Choices Program website.

Co-sponsored by: University of Pittsburgh’s National Consortium for Teaching About Asia Site and the Global Studies Center, University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh.

Attachments:
1-Day Workshop Flyer PA 2015.pdf
ChoicesProgramWorkshopFlyer.png

CERIS 2016 Book Discussion

University of Pittsburgh, 4217 Posvar Hall Friday, February 19, 2016
5:00pm- 6:00pm Dinner
6:00pm- 8:00pm Book Discussion in person or videoconference

K-16 Educators and librarians are invited to participate in the bi-annual CERIS Faculty Readers' Forum.

NEXT MEETING: February 19 2016, University of Pittsburgh
Who is Allah? by Bruce B. Lawrence

Our Faculty Readers' Forum provides cross-disciplinary reading materials - including books, articles, and papers related to Islamic studies - and a venue for discussion and exchange of ideas. Our long term goal is to broaden current course curriculum at member institutions to include Islamic studies content in ongoing courses and/or the creation of new courses.

The February 19th meeting will take place the University of Pittsburgh.
Educators can participate via SKYPE or in person
We begin with a light dinner at 5:00 PM and the discussion follows, wrapping up around 8:00 PM
CERIS provides 15 free copies of the the book being discussed. Those who receive a free book should attend the discussion in person or via SKYPE.

For more information contact Elaine Linn at eel58@pitt.edu or visit the CERIS website

Fall 2015

Pittsburgh’s World Language Connection

Friday, November 6, 2015, 8:00am- 2:00pm
Fox Chapel Area High School, Pittsburgh, PA

Please join us for a special day just for world language teachers, ESL teachers, social studies teachers, and administrators.
Highlights include the following:

  • FREE curricular and instructional materials for teachers from the University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies Center
  • International enrichment programs for students - here in Pittsburgh
  • Information on the new Global Scholars Program from PSMLA
  • Opportunities for international service learning trips
  • Exploration of a global citizenship curriculum

Schedule for the Day:
 8:00am  Registration & Breakfast
 9:00am  Welcome & Keynote Address
 9:45am  Session I
10:45am Session II
11:45am Session III
12:30pm Catered Lunch & Table Talks
 1:30pm  Debriefing & Next Steps
 2:00pm  Wrap Up

Event Flyer

CERIS Book Discussion

Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi's Mission of Peace, by Robert Matson, Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown

Friday, October 30, 2015
5:00pm- 8:00pm
Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA.

Please join other K-16 educators and librarians to participate in this book discussion and both expand your self-knowledge and bring new ideas to your curriculum. Friday, October 30, 2015, 5:00 pm dinner (Dining Room, Administration Bldg); 8:00 pm discussion (Reeves Memorial Library), Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA. Participate in person or via videoconference. Co-sponsored by the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic studies (CERIS) and Seton Hill University. To attend dinner and book discussion, register here.

Spring 2015

Integrating International and Global Education in K-12 Schools

5 Thursdays April 9 through May 7, 2015
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

This course is designed to teach practitioners working in the K-12 environment to strategically plan for educational opportunities that will enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become not only competitive and successful workers in the global marketplace, but also informed and responsible citizens able to address complex global issues. Specifically course participants will: •Learn about international and global education as a field of study and its current status in U.S. public education •Learn about online, local, and national resources to help them plan curriculum that is more global in content and orientation •Learn about possibilities and challenges for schools that want to integrate international and global education into their educational offerings •Develop lesson plans, programs or strategic plans to use in their own practice •Have the opportunity to network and learn from colleagues in other districts

The course is open to and welcomes teachers at all levels (with a greater emphasis on practices for grades 9-12) and from all departments. It is also highly recommended for office administrators. Upon completion of the course requirements participants can earn a total of 25 ACT 48 credits.

Dr. Marzia Cozzolino DiCicco Global Studies Center Associate will lead the course. Registration is required. To register click here. Dinner, parking and materials will be provided.

Global Issues through Literature

Tuesday, April 14, 2015
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Winchester Thurston fifth grade teacher Karen Gaul will frame N. H. Senzai's Shooting Kabul in the context of the human experience and discuss its use as a basis for exploring global concepts with the middle years learner. She will also share with our K-12 community on how she incorporated Shooting Kabul, along with related resources, into her reading workshop classes. Registration is required. To register click here. Educators can participate in person or online. Dinner, parking and the book will be provided.

Based in part on Ms. Senzai’s husband’s experience fleeing Soviet controlled Afghanistan in 1979, Shooting Kabul is a powerful story of hope, love, and perseverance.

Global Education for Young Learners:  How the Foundations of Global Competencies Can be Taught in Elementary School

Tuesday, May 19, 2015
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Recognizing the interconnectedness of our world and how today's students are called to collaborate and understand a dynamic and ever changing global landscape, this workshop will highlight one school's journey incorporating Global Competency in the curriculum.  Focusing on five key areas of Global Competency – Identity, Integrity, Diversity, Global Issue Awareness, and Academic Knowledge, Winchester Thurston School has developed a framework purposefully introducing and integrating lessons, facts, and dispositions into their students’ experiences. Join Ashley Harper, Director of the Lower School, and Karen Gaul, Global Citizenship Coordinator and fifth grade teacher, for an interactive discussion and hands-on planning session detailing their experience and exploring yours. This workshop is open to and welcomes teachers at all levels (with a greater emphasis on practices for grades PreK-5) and all departments.  It is also highly recommended for school administrators.  The workshop will include a breakout session for individual application and materials including research base, framework examples, and sample lessons.  


Global Issues through Literature

Friday, February 20, 2015
5:30pm- 8:30pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

K-16 educators are invited to attend the CERIS spring 2015 book discussion. Dr. Luke Peterson of the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate discussion. Registration is required. Educators can participate in person or online. Dinner, parking and the book will be provided.

Mornings of Jenin is the story of four generations of Palestinians living through the birth of Israel and the never ending war that follows. Palestinian Author Susan Abulhawa gives the terrible conflict a human face.

Spring 2014

Global Issues through Literature

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISOVICH is a novel written by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first published in November 1962 in the Soviet literary magazine Novy Mir (New World). The story is set in a Soviet labor camp in the 1950s, and describes a single day of an ordinary prisoner, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov. Its publication was an extraordinary event in Soviet literary history—never before had an account of Stalinist repression been openly distributed.
Dr. Roger Rouse, professor with the Global Studies Center and Joshua Andy, history teacher at Winchester-Thurston will present this book giving both a historical background and lesson plans to incorporate the book in a history, social studies or world literature curriculum.

Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series. Co-sponsored by the Center for Russian and East European Studies.

Hands-On Social Media Workshop: Understanding and Using Virtual Communities in the Classroom and Beyond

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm 4130 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Dinner and parking provided with registration.

Do you consider yourself a very basic user of Facebook? Do you know the difference between Twitter and Tumblr? Have you tried to create a wiki for a class project, or does the very idea keep you up at night? Pitt’s international studies outreach program will host an interactive workshop to help teachers improve their use of social media websites and tools for education and personal use, including:

· Collaborative projects (for example, Wikispaces)
· Blogs and microblogs (for example, Twitter)
· Social news networking sites (for example, Reddit)
· Content communities (for example, YouTube)
· Social networking sites (for example, Facebook)

Participants are highly encouraged (but not required) to bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone to this workshop in order to gain full hands-on experience in setting up user accounts, understanding how these sites can help or hinder educational projects, and explore what other educators have done to successfully add a social media dimension to school or personal projects.

Sponsored by the African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Business Center.

Global Issues through Literature

Thursday, March 6, 2014
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

This workshop continues to explore different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. The workshop will focus on Antigua and the topic of human security. Dr. Roger Rouse, Professor in the Global Studies Center will discuss the novel A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid.

Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the International Business Center

Global Issues through Literature

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
5:00pm- 8:00pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Winchester Thurston's faculty Karen Gaul, Central Catholic High School's faculty Matthew Sudnik, and Professor  Roger Rouse, Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh, will frame Hsiao-Hung Pai's Scattered Sand in the context of Human Security to discuss China's rural migrants. They will share with our K-12 community on how they also used the book to look at globalization and consumerism.

Co-sponsored by the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia and the International Business Center

Global Issues through Literature: Nepal

Tuesday,May 6,  2014
5:30pm- 8:45pm
4217 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Sewickley Academy's Michael-Ann Cerniglia, will frame Conor Grennan's Little Princesin in the context of Human Security to discuss Nepal's child workers. She will share with our K-12 community on how she also used the book to look at globalization and how she incorporated the text into her Human Geography.  Participants will receive a free copy of the book.

Co-sponsored by the International Business Center

Summer 2014

 

Global Studies to Host Summer Study in Jordan for Teachers

Ahlan Wa Sahlan! Soon you'll be able to say this and more greetings in Arabic! We are pleased to announce Global Studies will lead a four-week study program in Jordan this summer. Through this amazing experience, high school teachers will enhance their ability to educate students about the Arab and Islamic world and become proficient in colloquial Arabic. In addition to language learning, we will examine two major themes "Migration, Displacement and Integration" and "Local Responses to Geo-Politics: Past and Present." We will look though several lenses: historical, geographic, religious, economic and artistic when considering these two major themes.

 

While in Jordan, teachers will participate in language classes (35%), area study courses, site visits, cultural tours, dialogue with practitioners, scholars and activists, (35%), community service (10%), and team work creating curriculum for their secondary classrooms (15%). There is free-time and weekend excursions too! For more information about this program, click here .

The program is sponsored by the US Department of Education, Fulbright Hays Group Projects Abroad.

Fall 2013


Global Issues through Literature

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

This workshop is the first in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. This workshop will focus on Africa and the topic of human security. Dr. Yolanda Covington-Ward,  Assistant Professor in Africana Studies will discuss the novel The House at Sugar Beach by Helene Cooper.

Helene grew up at Sugar Beach, a twenty-two-room mansion by the sea. Her childhood was filled with servants, flashy cars, a villa in Spain, and a farmhouse up-country. It was also an African childhood, filled with knock foot games and hot pepper soup, heartmen and neegee. But Liberia was like an unwatched pot of water left boiling on the stove. And on April 12, 1980, a group of soldiers staged a coup d'état, assassinating President William Tolbert and executing his cabinet. The Coopers and the entire Congo class were now the hunted, being imprisoned, shot, tortured, and raped. After a brutal daylight attack by a ragtag crew of soldiers, Helene, Marlene, and their mother fled Sugar Beach, and then Liberia, for America."

Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series.

Living with Differences: International Student Photo Contest 2013

Photo Contest

In a world with tremendous diversity of beliefs and cultures, how do we live together amicably? Part of the answer lies in pluralism: the appreciation of diversity and differences, with recognition of and respect for shared values. Students everywhere, we challenge you to submit a photo that illustrates this concept! The minimum age is 13. For more information click here.

Symposium on China Today
October 25-27, 2013

We welcome all K-12 educators, business and community members to attend all or sections of the symposium for free. The symposium will open with two keynote lectures on Friday evening on an overview of the issues. This will be followed by instructional lectures on Saturday and Sunday on various themes impacting China by experts in the field. Act 48 will be provided. For information, click here . To register for this symposium, click here.

World On Trial Workshop
Saturday, November 9, 2013  

World On TrialFor K-12 teachers who would like a creative approach to bringing a global issue to the classroom. The pilot episode of World on Trialdeals with the 2004 French Law banning the conspicuous display of religious symbols in public schools, most notably affecting the right of young Muslim women to wear traditional head scarves or other forms of cover. Workshop participants will watch the episode and hear from experts on the history of law, the significance of the law and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the curriculum and supplementary materials designed for use with the televised program. Act 48 available. For more information, click here. To register click here.


Global Issues through Literature
Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Behind the Beautiful Forevers

Sewickley Academy's professors, Michael -Ann Cerniglia (History), Joan Cucinotta, and Ronald Kinser (Biology)  will frame Katherine Boo's Behind the Beautiful Forevers in the context of Human Rights and using social media to communicate needs and rights. They will share with our K-12 community on how they also used the book to look at globalization and consumerism. For more information, click here. To register, click here.

Symposium on the Intricacies of Muslim Societies in South Asia

November 15-17, 2013

Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world, the symposia series seeks to have the audience gain understanding of the religious, culture, economics and political influences of Muslims in a global context. Act 48 credit will be provided. For more information, click here. To register, click here.

Global Issues Through Literature: Latin America Changing Identities
This workshop is the fifth in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. This workshop will focus on Latin America and the topic of changing identities. Dr. Karen Gloldman, Assistant Director of Outreach for the Center for Latin American Studies will discuss the novel Chronicle of a Death Foretold by ‪Gabriel Garcia Marquez. “A man returns to the town where a baffling murder took place 27 years earlier, determined to get to the bottom of the story. Just hours after marrying the beautiful Angela Vicario, everyone agrees, Bayardo San Roman returned his bride in disgrace to her parents. Her distraught family forced her to name her first lover; and her twin brothers announced their intention to murder Santiago Nasar for dishonoring their sister. Yet if everyone knew the murder was going to happen, why did no one intervene to stop it? The more that is learned, the less is understood, and as the story races to its inexplicable conclusion, an entire society--not just a pair of murderers—is put on trial. 
Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series. (May 22, 2013)

Global Issues Through Literature: Asia- Changing Identities
This workshop is the fourth in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. This workshop will focus on the Asia and the topic of changing identities. Dr. Diana Wood, Enrichment & Outreach Coordinator, National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) will discuss the novel Please Look After Mom by Kyung-sook Shin. “When sixty-nine-year-old So-nyo is separated from her husband among the crowds of the Seoul subway station, her family begins a desperate search to find her. Yet as long-held secrets and private sorrows begin to reveal themselves, they are forced to wonder: how well did they actually know the woman they called Mom? Told through the piercing voices and urgent perspectives of a daughter, son, husband, and mother, Please Look After Mom is at once an authentic picture of contemporary life in Korea and a universal story of family love. Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series. (April 17, 2013)

Muslims in a Global Context: The Gulf States and Iran
This mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community, The series and course seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim Community around the world. It is anticipated that many issues and complexities will be woven in the course discussion such as US involvement in various regions. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world the mini course series seeks to have students gain understanding of the religious, culture, economics and political influences of Muslims in a global context. Teachers will receive ACT 48 credit and a free copy of the textbook. (April 5- April 7, 2013)

South Africa Today
As a rising state in the world economy and with a rich history and culture, South Africa’s status is shifting. South Africa Today is a three day mini course, consisting of 14 hours of classes over a weekend. The course will open with two keynote lectures on Friday evening on an overview of the issues. This will be followed by instructional lectures on Saturday on the various themes by experts in the fields. Sunday morning will be a discussion of two case studies and a panel discussion by the speakers on future challenges, and some possible projections/ recommendations. Teachers will receive ACT 48 credit and a free copy of the textbook. (March 22- March 24)

Hollywood and History: Using Popular Culture to Teach Social Studies
This workshop, presented by Dr. Soren Fanning of Robert Morris University, is designed to emphasize both the advantages and pitfalls of historical dramas and popular documentaries, not only for history teachers, but teachers of civics, sociology, and current events. Teachers will address the impact of visual media on learning and memory, the difference between events we see and those we recall, and the types of learning objectives the visual media can enhance. Historical films, documentaries, and miniseries will be the main items examined by both Dr. Fanning and the attendees. This workshop is being offered for 3 ACT 48 credits, and is co-sponsored by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. (March 21, 2013)

Global Issues Through Literature: Middle East- Conflict- Conflict Resolution
This workshop is the third in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. This workshop will focus on the Middle East and the topic of changing identities. Dr. Sami Hermez, UCIS Visiting Professor in Contemporary International Issues will discuss the novel In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar. “Libya, 1979. Nine-year-old Suleiman’s days are circumscribed by the narrow rituals of childhood: outings to the ruins surrounding Tripoli, games with friends played under the burning sun, exotic gifts from his father’s constant business trips abroad. But his nights have come to revolve around his mother’s increasingly disturbing bedside stories full of old family bitterness. Suleiman is soon caught up in a world he cannot hope to understand—where the sound of the telephone ringing becomes a portent of grave danger; where his mother frantically burns his father’s cherished books; where a stranger full of sinister questions sits outside in a parked car all day; where his best friend’s father can disappear overnight, next to be seen publicly interrogated on state television.” Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48-credit will be given at the end of the series. (March 20, 2013)

Global Issues Through Literature: Russia- Teaching Amerika to American Students: Global Communication and Recent Russian Literature
This workshop is the second in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. This workshop will focus on Russia and the topic of communication and technology. The presenters will discuss the collections of short stories in Amerika: Russian Writers View the United States. "This collection of beautifully written and entertaining literary essays by a wide range of Russian writers - young and old, funny and sombre, angry and celebratory, many being translated for the first time - offers readers a unique chance to see Americans in a whole new light, to question how the American dream stands up to the American reality, and to experience the wit and generosity of today's Russian writers." Participants will receive a copy of the novel once they have registered. Act 48 credit will be given at the end of the series. (February 5, 2013)

A History of Terrorism
Terrorism is one of the forces defining our age, but it has also been around since some of the earliest civilizations. This one-of-a-kind study of the history of terrorism — from ancient Assyria to the post-9/11 War on Terror — puts terrorism into broad historical, political, religious and social context. Visiting scholar, Dr. Randy Law (Birmingham- Southern College) will lead the participants through the shifting understandings and definitions of terrorism through the ages, and its continuous development of themes allows for a fuller understanding of the uses of and responses to terrorism. The study of terrorism is constantly growing and ever changing. Prof. Law will give teachers access to this rich field through the most up-to-date research combined with a much-needed long-range historical perspective. He extensively covers jihadism, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, Northern Ireland and the Ku Klux Klan plus lesser known movements in Uruguay, Algeria and even the pre-modern uses of terror in ancient Rome, medieval Europe and the French Revolution, among other topics. The first twenty teachers to register will receive a copy of Prof. Law’s book (January 17, 2013)

Muslims in a Global Context: Afghanistan, Pakistan and India
This mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community, The series and course seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim Community around the world. It is anticipated that many issues and complexities will be woven in the course discussion such as US involvement in various regions or the historical context of Israel and Palestine. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world the mini course series seeks to have students gain understanding of the religious, culture, economics and political influences of Muslims in a global context. Teachers will receive ACT 48 credit and a free copy of the textbook. (November 16-November 18, 2012)

Global Issues Through Literature: Europe and Immigration
This workshop is the first in a series of six workshops focusing on different global issues and how educators can use literature to further explore the topic. The first workshop will focus on Europe and the topic of immigration. Dr. Bernard Hagerty will discuss the novel Bruno, Chief of Police, by the journalist Martin Walker. It is a remarkable portrayal of the new, multicultural French countryside. North African immigrants are central to the plot and are portrayed in an evenhanded and nuanced way, and rural people themselves appear as a pressured minority. History matters, and the EU is omnipresent. Participants will receive a copy of the novel 2 weeks prior to the workshop. Act 48 credit will be given at the end of the series. (November 14, 2012)

World on Trial: 2004 French Headscarf Law Teachers' Workshop
In 2004, the French government banned the conspicuous display of religious symbols in public schools. This most notably affected the rights of young Muslim women to wear traditional headscarves or other forms of cover. This workshop will investigate the legal and ethical implications of the decision and include a discussion of the French and Islamic perspective. The Global Studies Center and the Center for Global Studies at Penn State is pleased to offer professional development workshops for practicing K-12 classroom teachers. (November 3, 2012)

Building a Culture of Peace in Pittsburgh Classrooms
Varghese Chakkummootil, Founder of Daya Center for Peace, will share his experience building peace in some of the most conflict-torn regions of the world. He will speak about peace initiatives that focus on building relationships and breaking cycles of violence, which can be used locally and internationally. Mr. Chakkummootil has worked with students and teachers from around the world to create a culture of peace in the classroom and gives teachers skills and tools to help students build peace and learn tolerance. Specific skills he will teach are: The Non-Violent Communication method, which helps individuals express themselves and get what they want in a respectful way that doesn't hurt others; Tools to reach the root of the problem, which will help teachers and students solve intractable issues; as well as a host of other skills and theories that are part of the Conflict Transformation methodology that goes beyond resolving the conflict to rebuilding broken relationships. (October 30, 2012)

India Today
As a rising state in the world economy and with a rich history and culture, India’s status is shifting. India Today is a three day mini course, consisting of 14 hours of classes over a weekend. The course will open with two keynote lectures on Friday evening on an overview of the issues. This will be followed by instructional lectures on Saturday on the various themes by experts in the fields. Sunday morning will be a discussion of two case studies and a panel discussion by the speakers on future challenges, and some possible projections/ recommendations. Teachers will receive ACT 48 credit and a free copy of the textbook. (October 26- October 28, 2012)

Islam and Culture around the World
This workshop is designed to inform secondary school educators about the cultures, economic systems, governments, and other aspects of life in the Muslim world to allow for a richer understanding of people living in these regions and countries. It will extend existing resources for understanding Islam and provide teachers with authentic experiences and materials. The keynote talk will be given by Christina Michelmore (Chatham University) on “Islam: Faith, Culture, Civilization.” Dr. Michlemore will discuss the historical development of Islam as a faith; how interpretations of that faith created ways of life associated with religion; how imperialism, modernity and inefficient governments challenged those ways of life; and how Muslims have met those challenges with a variety of responses - traditionalist, reformist, radical, and reactionary. Educators who traveled to Egypt on a federally funded Fulbright-Hays program will provide participating teachers with lesson plans to use in the classroom. Following their presentation will be a panel of Muslims from diverse backgrounds giving their perspectives. (June 14, 2011)

World Population, Food and the Environment
This workshop will address population growth and the challenges it poses – in particular, the challenge of providing everyone with an adequate diet while simultaneously conserving the natural resources on which agriculture and other economic activities depend. Both science and social studies teachers will be able to learn about the environmental issues involved in food systems that impact production, with special attention to population growth and the prospects for environmentally sound agricultural development in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Speakers will include: Dr. Douglas Southgate (Ohio State University) and Amanda Lavelle - South Butler SD Teachers will be provided with suggested lesson plans, classroom exercises and other curricular material. This workshop is being offered for 3 Act 48 continuing education credits. Dinner and parking will be provided. This workshop is free. This workshop will be held in cooperation with the Asian Studies Center, Pittsburgh Regional Center for Science Teachers at the School of Education, and Global Solutions Pittsburgh. (May 26, 2011)

Nuts & Bolts of the UN 
While dozens of schools and thousands of high school students in Southwestern Pennsylvania participate in Model United Nations, the overwhelming majority does not. For these students, their knowledge of the UN and its functions is fairly limited. This workshop will provide background information on the history of the United Nations, its evolution as an international organization, and its current role in the international community. In addition to the traditional discussion of the Security Council and peacekeeping missions, a strong emphasis will be placed on how the UN touches the lives of people on a daily basis. While far more mundane than security issues, the majority of the work done by the UN goes unnoticed, but is essential for daily life in a globally connected world. Teachers will be provided with curricular and background reading materials as well as information regarding Model UN. This workshop will be held in cooperation with the Global Solutions Pittsburgh. (May 4, 2011)

The World History Course: An Overview for Teachers
These six workshops provide a comprehensive review of the materials and issues in teaching world history. Taken together, the workshops provide a graduate-level course in curriculum design and implementation. The course is organized for both middle school and high school teachers, in the expectation that interaction among teachers and familiarity with a wide range of materials and issues will strengthen teachers at each level. Rather than center on a specific curriculum, the course focuses on major underlying issues in teaching world history: how students learn, how teachers can facilitate global thinking, how to set and sustain course priorities, examples of materials on world history since 1500, use of field trips in teaching, and assessment at various levels. Course directors are Patrick Manning (Director, World History Center) and John Meyers (Associate Professor in Instruction and Learning, School of Education).

  • Workshop 1, October 2, 2010 (Saturday): “Teaching and Learning World History” (Bob Bain, University of Michigan) How students learn, as addressed by this nationally noted authority, including: the design and use of history-specific technology for students engaged in historical inquiry; discussion of teaching and learning history in museums and with museum resources.
  • Workshop 2, November 13, 2010 (Saturday): “Pedagogy of World History” (John Myers and Lawrence Charap) Global thinking and global processes in the classroom: a model lesson on U.S. immigration is expanded to a world context. Participants will then analyze the lesson, conclude whether it works, and discuss pedagogy in a world history framework.
  • Workshop 3, December 4, 2010 (Saturday): “Teaching World History since 1500” (Thomas Anderson) Materials and ideas for the high school world history course. Approaches to teaching include thinking in terms of continents, oceans, networks, global phenomena, and global stories. Examples include the slave trade, revolutions, migration, and the environment.
  • Workshop 4, February 26, 2011 (Saturday): “Overview and Priorities for Teachers of World History” (Patrick Manning) Setting and achieving goals for the whole school year, rather than week by week. How to develop consistent themes and debates; how to strengthen pacing by involving students in linking time periods.
  • Workshop 5, March 26, 2011 (Saturday): “Western PA in World History” (Marc Jason Gilbert, Hawaii Pacific University). The editor of World History Connected presents new teaching materials and field trips on our region in world history. Examples include waves of settlement, economy, religion, community, and connections of Western PA to other regions.
  • Workshop 6, April 23, 2011 (Saturday): “Assessment in World History” (Patrick Manning and John Myers)

Human Rights
Consistently teachers report that one of the topics that their students are most interested in is human rights. For this workshop we intend to bring in a well-known speaker to present on the broad aspects of the topic internationally and nationally, and then discuss local dimensions and provide ways for students to get involved. By providing a well-known speaker we will be able to draw attention to the significance of the topic being discussed. This workshop is being offered for 3 Act 48 Credits and will be held in cooperation with the Global Solutions Pittsburgh. (February 16, 2011)

Teaching Global Issues Through Narrative Film
Teachers frequently use narrative film to complement the traditional lecture format of classroom instruc­tion. Fortunately there are a significant number of readily available narrative films that deal with interna­tional issues. For this workshop we will invite back Dr. Karl Skutski, an Adjunct Professor of International Film Studies at Duquesne University. He will provide suggestions for films to use for various topics and review important elements of film studies to discuss in conjunction with viewing a film for academic purposes. This workshop is being offered for 3 Act 48 continuing education credits. (October 27, 2010)

Experience the World Through Simulations
Experiential learning tools are becoming increasingly popular and well recognized as valuable teaching methods. This workshop will introduce the use of these tools in the classroom and describe the pedagogical benefits of their use. We will discuss Model UN, Model EU, and Moot ICC as well as the new Euro Challenge program. This workshop is being offered for 3 Act 48 continuing education credits. (September 16, 2010)

Global Education Lab
The Global Education Lab is an information-packed full-day workshop on global education for teachers and administrators. The Workshop is hands-on intensive and provides you with everything from global perspectives to lesson plans and supplementary materials for the next day’s classroom. (August 21, 2010)

How to Teach Humanitarian Intervention in 45 Minutes
Conducted by Taylor Seybolt, Assistant Professor of International Affairs and Interim Director of the Ford Institute for Human Security at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. This workshop will cover issues related to the Responsibility to Protect, UN peacekeeping, and more. It will be hosted the same day as the Pitt Model UN Conference; a break will be given so that teachers may observe their students for part of the day. This workshop is being offered for Act 48 credit. (November 9, 2009)

How to Design a Global Issues Course for Your High School
Undoubtedly global issues education is a prerequisite to success in this global economy. However, many schools in the region do not offer their students Global Issues or Global Civics classes. This workshop will help teachers design a new global issues class or add global issues components to existing classes. Class content will be covered but the primary focus will be on mechanics of designing and adding a class to your school’s curriculum. Global Solutions Board Member and teacher at South Fayette, Felix Yerace, Professor Dave Manel of the Community College of Allegheny College and Jessica Friedrichs of Carlow University will be presenting. This workshop is being offered for Act 48 credit. (October 2009)

Think Global / Act Local: Pittsburgh and the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 
GSP in cooperation with the Global Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh will be hosting a series of workshops on the UN Millennium Development Goals. Over four nights, all eight Goals will be presented from both an international and local angle. Many of the issues facing the UN and highlighted by the MDG are so often thought of as problems of the developing world. This workshop will present those traditional aspects but also show how the issues affect people right here in western Pennsylvania. Experts from a variety of community organizations will be on hand to present each MDG and offer volunteer opportunities for high school students. Representatives from Adagio Health Inc., Brother’s Brother Foundation, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Nine Mile Run Watershed Association, Magee Womancare International and the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force will be presenting. The workshop will be primarily targeted at teachers, but students are welcome to register and attend. These workshops are being offered for Act 48 credit. (September/October 2009)

Understanding Islamic Frameworks in a Global Context
Keynote Speaker: “Islamic Democratic Discourse”, Dr. Muqtedar Khan, University of Delaware Plus panel discussions to include the topics: Muslim Minority Populations in Europe, Islamic Finance and Commerce, Islamic Law and Politics, and The Muslim Brotherhood Additional speakers: Melissa Parker, University of Pittsburgh Adnan Zulfigar, J.D., University of Pennsylvania Dr. Tony Gaskew, University of Pittsburgh, Bradford Susan Hascall, J.D., Duquesne University Haider Ala Hamoudi, J.D., University of Pittsburgh Sponsored by: CERIS, European Union Center of Excellence/European Studies Center, Global Studies Program, International Business Center (Pitt CIBER), Russian and East European Studies Center, PennLauder, CIBER (May 21, 2009)

Free at Last? Pittsburgh’s Place in the Atlantic World
The World History Center, The School of Education and the Global Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh presents a workshop for secondary teachers, extending the materials of “Free at Last? Slavery in Pittsburgh in the 18th and 19th Centuries,” an exhibition at the Heinz History Center created by the University of Pittsburgh. The exhibit traces our region's longstanding involvement with slavery. It is centered on records from 1792-1857, newly discovered by the Allegheny County Recorder of Deeds, that document the sale, freedom rights, and imprisonment of more than 50 slaves and indentured servants in Western Pennsylvania. The workshop will explore materials from the exhibit and will provide curriculum materials on Pennsylvania, U.S. history, and world history. Act 48 credit is available for participation in the workshop. (April 25, 2009)

Global Crises, Global Solutions
As the new president begins his term in power, what are the most important global crises that we will have to face and what are some possible solutions to those crises? Accelerating climate change, financial instability, migration, outsourcing, pandemics, corruption, and protectionism are challenging crises that transcend cultural and national boundaries. Such crises are complex and often poorly understood, leading to discussions of public policy based on misunderstandings, faulty information, or oversimplification. The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and the Global Studies Program of the University of Pittsburgh are offering an educational program titled 'Global Crises, Global Solutions'. Spread over five three-hour weekly sessions between March 21st and April 18th, this program will help us better understand these challenges by leveraging the collective knowledge of a team of doctoral students of GSPIA to shed light on the questions and issues at hand, while keeping in mind the local connection. 'Global Crises, Global Solutions' will offer participants a unique opportunity for cooperative engagement with budding academics as well as fellow participants from the Pittsburgh community to discuss these pressing global challenges and share insights on what has and has not worked in attempting to solve them. (March 21- April 18, 2009)

China Today: Ethnicity, Education and Innovation
China Today is a 14 hour workshop over a weekend which will explore: - Who are “the Chinese”? How does China’s muti-ethnic composition affect educational opportunity and career advancement? - Education in China past and present: how does the history of education in China affect educational opportunity today? - What is in store as China moves from techno- logical supplier to technological innovator? Workshop participants will receive 13 Act 48 credit hours. To see a brochure click here. (March 20-23, 2009)

How to Teach the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 45 Minutes
Teachers will be given a basic substantive introduction to the history and content of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A packet with information and resources for use in a 45-minute length class will be distributed to participants. Wes Rist and Amy Langham will discuss methods and activities for engaging students in the learning process and resources available online to educators. Teachers will leave with the capacity and materials to teach the course and adjust it to any age group. Two additional keynote speakers will also address the teachers. Workshop participants will receive 3.5 Act 48 credit hours. Visit this website for more information: http://www.cmu.edu/global-solutions-conference/. (February 21, 2009)

Contemporary Egypt, Shaped by the Past
This workshop series is designed to help high school educators incorporate age-appropriate and culturally sensitive content into existing school curricula. While its historic stature as a world leader is well known, today's Egypt remains the most influential Islamic Arab nation in the world. Rather than attempt a broad-brush summary of Egypt's past, the workshops provide essential background information for just a few relevant topics. The result is content and instruction modules making dynamic connections between past and present, useful in classrooms of art, world cultures, sociology, history, current events, and world religions. Lesson plans are available for the workshops below.

  • Workshop 1 - Egypt: Influences and Intrigue (June 17, 2008)
  • Workshop 2 - Egypt: Changes and Choices (October 13, 2008)
  • Workshop 3 - Egypt: Perceptions and Politics (February 7, 2009) Read more.

Pittsburgh 250 – Pittsburgh and the World circa 1758
In November 1758, exactly 250 years ago, British colonial troops assumed possession of the French Fort Duquesne at the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers. The settlement located there became know as Pittsburgh. While Pittsburgh was in its infancy in the mid-18th century, many nations were also in the midst of volatile change. Though Pittsburgher's knowledge of these global events was limited; what was happening in other places would impact their future. This workshop will examine global political, economic, religious, and social events circa 1758 and look at their implications for the Pittsburgh region. Travel with us to Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America as we look at case studies from each continent. This workshop for middle and high school social studies teachers is designed to broaden educators' knowledge about world history and help them develop lessons for classroom use. World regional experts will discuss historical overviews focused on political, economic, religious, and social concerns of the 18th century. Discussions will be followed by breakout sessions lead by a curriculum development professional who will guide teachers in preparing lesson drafts based on the day's content. Teachers will be given additional time to complete and submit the finalized lesson. The University Center for International Studies (UCIS) will format and publish the lessons. All participants will receive copies, and they will also reside on the UCIS area studies centers' Web sites. (October 13, 2008)

Model United Nations at Your School
This professional development workshop is designed for secondary educators to prepare their students to participate in Model United Nations Simulations. Morning session will begin with an introduction to the United Nations (UN) as an international organization. Afternoon session will focus on current issues of the UN that are most relevant to Model UN Simulations. The workshop will close with participants not only learning the rules of debate, but how to teach them to their students. (August 13, 2008)

Current Global Issues: Corporate Ethics and Human Rights
This faculty and graduate student development workshop looks at corporate ethics and the role they play in human rights issues. The workshop is divided into two panels: the first addresses issues of corporate ethics and labor, and the second focuses on issues of corporate ethics and the state. Panelists include Michael Goodhart, associate professor of political science, University of Pittsburgh; Patrick Atkins, CEO, Atkins 360 L.L.C Sustainability and Consulting; Dan Kovalik, Esq., assistant general council, United Steelworkers Union; Douglas Branson, W. Edward Sell Professor of Business Law, University of Pittsburgh School of Law; S. Mohsin Hashim, associate professor of political science, Muhlenberg College; Luis B. Schwartz, Esq., president, China Strategies; and D. Wes Rist, Esq., assistant director, Center for Legal Education, University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Sponsors include the Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Global Studies Program, European Studies Center, European Union Center for Excellence, International Business Center, and Global Solutions Education Fund. (May 21, 2008)

Materials Development for the Less Commonly Taught Languages
This workshop with Bill Johnston, associate professor of Second Language Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, focuses on teaching foreign language reading skills, offering a range of suggestions for using written texts at various levels of language teaching. It emphasizes interactive, communicative ways of utilizing authentic texts in the language classroom. Sponsored by the European Studies Center, the Global Studies Program, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and Center for Latin American Studies. (February 21, 2008)

Otto Chu Essay Contest
For Pennsylvania high school juniors and seniors, the topics for 2007 are 1) Melanesia, the southwestern region of the Pacific Islands; 2) Rapid development in China and India has caught the world's attention; and 3) Japan and Korea have both made significant inroads into the world market for consumer goods, notably in automobiles and electronics, and corporations from both countries are now multinational, with factories in the United States as well as other countries, so identify and compare their strategies for achieving this global success. Sponsored by the Chu Financial Management Corporation, Global Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, and University Center for International Studies. (April 22, 2008)

Allegheny County Intermediate Unit County Wide Workshop: Women, Religion, and Society Around the World
This workshop looks at how Judaism, Islam, and Buddhism have interpreted the role of women in religion and society. Presentations address the following themes: history and the status of women; texts and interpretations; symbols and gender; sexuality and social change; and women's official and unofficial roles. Sponsors include the Global Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, and European Studies Center. (October 8, 2007)

!Carnaval! Around the World
This professional development workshop for elementary and middle school teachers explores Carnival traditions in eight cities and towns throughout Europe and the Americas. Educators become acquainted with festivities held in the lead up to Lent, as well as harvest ceremonies and political movements such as the emancipation movement. The workshop enables teachers to integrate the study of Carnival traditions into classroom curricula, either as an entry point for the study of different cultures or as a complement to existing curriculum on cultural diversity. Sponsored by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and Center for Latin American Studies, the European Studies Center, and the Global Studies Program. (September 23, 2007)

Egypt: Intersection of East and West
Throughout the millennia Egypt has played a pivotal role in the geopolitical crossroad of cultures. It is seen as a site of political, social, and religious change as Arab, African, Western, Islamic, and Christian cultures meet and mingle in the latest of a long history of encounters. Workshop speakers highlight the historical and contemporary significance of east and west convergence and its impact upon Egyptian society throughout the ages. Egypt is a place to begin studying how the western world developed as a result of synergies, divergence, and the "clash" civilizations, and how the "Oriental" world has responded and evolved as a result of interactions with the west. The workshop is designed for secondary and tertiary educators with interest in western civilization, world cultures, world religions, the Middle East, Africa, African American history, and foreign languages. Sponsored by the Global Studies Program and the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies. (April 21, 2007

Global Economics: Understanding Today's World
This workshop focuses on economic ties that increasingly bind the world together: foreign investment and commerce among countries in disparate regions. It offers 9-12 educators training in the language of economics, (trade flows, goods and services, comparative advantage, transitional economies, etc.), and then explores the impact of the global economy on different regions of the world. Sponsored by the Global Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Center for Latin American Studies, and European Studies Center. (April 14, 2007)

 

Copyright 2017 | Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh