Russia Today

Economy, Technology, and People

Friday, October 24, 2014 - Sunday, October 26, 2014

 

Russia Today

Class times: 5pm Friday, October 24, 2014 to 1:30pm Sunday, October 26, 2014 (100 Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University)

Russia Today is a one-credit (Pitt)/ three-unit (CMU) mini course, consisting of 14 hours of classes over a weekend, with a major paper assignment to be completed for credit. This course is created for undergraduate and graduate students. However, K-12 educators, business and community members are welcome to attend all or sections of the course for free. The course will open with two keynote lectures on Friday evening on an overview of the issues. This will be followed by instructional lectures on Saturday on the various themes by experts in the fields.  Sunday morning will be a discussion of two case studies and a panel discussion by the speakers on future challenges and some possible projections/ recommendations.

Motivation:

As global citizens, students need to have a working knowledge of other countries, which are important in shaping the corporate, social and political world. As a rising state in the world economy, Russia’s status in the business and in world affairs is shifting.

Course Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, the students will:

1. Have a general understanding of the corporate, geo-political, cultural and social factors that define Russia’s economic, cultural and technological landscape at the present time.

2. Explore one of these factors in depth, through the research paper.

Faculty presenters: Please visit the Speakers and Abstract tab 

Textbook:

Wegren, S.K. (Ed.). (2012). Return to Putin's Russia: Past imperfect, future uncertain.  Plymouth, UK: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc. 

Book will be available in the Pitt Book Center and Carnegie Melon University Bookstore. 

Description:

This short course will explore how various intersections of economy, society, and identity interact in Russia and in the perceived position of Russia as an emerging world economy. It will explore questions such as:

  • How does Russia's history and diversity reflect in the policies and the economy of Russia? In the way Russians react with the market?
  • What are today’s challenges in attaining equity in quality of life in Russia? What are some of its greatest needs?
  • What are impediments to Russia’s economic and business growth?
  • What are some of the salient features of the U.S.-Russian relations?
  • How have cultural traditions and modernizations integrated in Russia? What have been some cultural responses to globalization?
  • What lies ahead? What are the opportunities and challenges in Russia’s immediate future?

Assessment:

Due to the immersive nature of the course, students are expected to attend all sessions on all three days. Further, each student will be required to read the assigned book and develop a research paper on one dimension of modern Russia that has been introduced in class. The paper should be based on one of the topics covered in the course. The length of the term paper will be 5-10 pages, double spaced in 11 point font. Research papers are due by November 21 at 5:00pm and should be submitted through Carnegie Mellon's Blackboard or University of Pittsburgh’s Courseweb assignment tab for the course.

Sample topics for term papers include:

▪       Historical factors in the development of Russia’s market economy

▪       Factors that encourage or retard technological innovation in Russia

▪       The role of education in making Russia a world power

▪       Financing innovation in Russia: foreign, multinational, and Russian enterprises

▪       Education and innovation in Russia

▪       Ethnicity and educational opportunity

▪       Russia’s economy—communist, socialist, capitalist, or something else?

▪       Global forces impacting the Russian economy

▪       Global forces impacting the Russian education system

Audit Option:

Carnegie Mellon students may also audit the course by attending all the sessions, but not writing the paper. You should be sure to process an audit form, both if you are auditing from the beginning or later if you have decided not to do a paper and want your status changed from credit to audit. Pitt students may also audit but students must choose this option before the beginning of the course and it will not appear on your transcript as having taken the course. Once the course has started students will be graded based on how they signed up for the course.

Note: The paper is not a book or chapter review, but an overall analysis that demonstrates your reading and thinking on the subject. First articulate an organizing question that you will attempt to answer, and proceed from there to find sources. The organizing question has to be an exploration on one of the issues or aspects addressed by one or several speakers in the course.

As this is a generalist course, we don’t expect a detailed economic or political analysis, but a thorough literature review on the topic and your synthesis of these readings to answer the question with a critical perspective.

Instructors (responsible for grades and class organization): 

Professor Amy Burkert (ak11@andrew.cmu.edu) is responsible for grades at Carnegie Mellon UniversityAndrew Konitzer (konitzer@pitt.edu) and Veronica Dristas (dristas@pitt.edu) at the University of Pittsburgh, respectively. Please send an e-mail to us individually if you have questions regarding grades.

Sponsored by:  University of Pittsburgh: Global Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European StudiesDepartment of Economics, Katz Graduate School of Business, the Swanson School of Engineering, International Business Center, and College of Business Administration
    
Carnegie Mellon University: H. John Heinz III College, Office of the Provost,Division of Student Affairs
 

Schedule (updated 10/23/14)

Friday, October 24 5:00 - 8:00pm

5:00 pm - 5:15 pm Brief Introductions and Welcome
5:15 pm - 6:30 pm Jonathan Harris- "From Gorbachev to Yeltsin to Putin"
6:30 pm - 6:45 pm Break
6:45 pm - 8:00 pm Thomas Remington- "Rebuilding the Social Contract in Post-Soviet Russia"

 

Saturday, October 25 9:00am - 6:45pm

9:00 am - 10:15 am David Greene- "Into the Heart of Russia"
10:15 am - 10:30 am Break
10:30am - 11:45 am Harley Balzer- "Civil Society, Public Opinion and the Russian Invasion of Ukraine"
11:45 am - 12:00 pm Break
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
 Judy Twigg- "Critical Condition? Health and Demographic Trends in Russia"
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm Lunch
2:30 pm - 3:45 pm Harley Balzer- "The Great Reversal: China and Russia in the Global Economy"
3:45-pm - 4:00 pm Break
4:00 pm - 5:15 pm Barry Ickes- "Russia's Addiction"
5:15 pm - 5:30 Break 
5:30-pm - 6:45 pm Stephen Wegren- "Russia's Rural Economy: Yesterday and Today" 

 

Sunday, October 26, 9:00am - 1:00pm

9:00am - 10:15am Boris Barkanov- "Russian Energy: State Power and Strategy in Natural Gas"  
10:15am - 10:30 am Break
10:30 am - 11:45 am Andrei Tsygankov- "The Sources of Russia's Ukraine Policy, 2004-2014" 
11:45 am - 12:00 pm Break
12:00pm - 1:00pm Conclusions and Closing Remarks

 

Harley Balzer

Harley Balzer is Associate Professor in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service, and an Associated Faculty member of the History Department at Georgetown University. Prior to coming to Georgetown he taught at Grinnell College and Boston University, and held post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard's Russian Research Center and the MIT Program in Science, Technology and Society. In 1983 he spent a year as a Congressional Fellow in the office of Congressman Lee Hamilton. 

In 1992-93 he served as Executive Director and Chairman of the Board of the International Science Foundation, George Soros's largest program to aid the former Soviet Union.  From 1998 to 2009, he was a member of the Governing Council of the Basic Research and Higher Education (BRHE) Program, funded by the MacArthur Foundation, Carnegie Corporation and Russian Ministry of Education. BRHE Established 16 Research and Education Centers at Russian Universities, and has since been significantly expanded by the Russian Government using their own resources. Since 2004 Dr. Balzer has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the European University at St. Petersburg.

Dr. Balzer's research interests include comparative authoritarianism, focusing on Russia and China; science and technology; education; and social history. His publications include Soviet Science on the Edge of Reform (1989); Five Years That Shook the World: Gorbachev's Unfinished Revolution,”(1991), which was named a CHOICE outstanding academic book; and Russia's Missing Middle Class: The Professions in Russian History (1996). Current writing projects include a comparative study of Russian and Chinese interaction with the global economy; a book on current Russian politics; a monograph on Russian higher education over the past century; and a study of the middle class after communism.

Boris Barkanov

Barkanov is a visiting assistant professor of political science at West Virginia University. He received his Phd in political science from UC Berkeley. His dissertation, Mercantilist Development, examined the domestic factors shaping Russian energy policy since the late Soviet period.  His research was based on data from a variety of sources, including elite interviews conducted during field work in Russia, most notably in 2008-2009 when he was a Fulbright Hays scholar. As a post-doctoral fellow at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian studies at Harvard University, he extended his findings through a comparative study of Russian and Chinese reserve currency policy since 1992. He speaks Russian, French, and Japanese. Barkanov's recent and forthcoming publications include:

“Ukraine Burning: Clash of Civilizations or Distribution of Power?” In Kanet, Roger E. and Sussex, Matthew, eds., Eurasia Rising? Power, Politics and Institutions in a Contested Region New York: Palgrave Macmillan (forthcoming 2015).

 “Identifying Revisionist Powers: the Ideological Line as State Structure in Russia and China (1991-2013),” World Politics (under review).

 “How Putin’s domestic audience explains Russia’s behavior,” The Monkey Cage, Washington Post, March 13, 2014.  Available at:http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/03/13/how-putins-domestic-audience-explains-russias-behavior/

  “The Geo-economics of Eurasian Gas: the Evolution of Russian Turkmen Relations in Natural Gas (1992-2010).” In Heinrich, Andreas and Pleines, Heiko, eds., Export Pipelines from the CIS region: Geopolitics, Securitization and Political Decision-making Changing Europe book series, vol. 10 (Stuttgart : Ibidem Publishers, 2014). 

David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

Jonathan Harris

Jonathan Harris is Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh where he teaches courses on the USSR and Russian federation, American foreign policy and American foreign policy in the Middle East. He is also the editor of the Russian and East European Series for the University of Pittsburgh Press. He has published two monographs on the role of the Communist party's full time officials under Stalin and under Gorbachev and is now working on a study of Khrushchev's use of state power. He has also published a series of short political portraits of leading Soviet officials for the Carl Beck Papers published by the Russian and East Studies Center at Pitt. He conducted research on local political developments in the city of Novosibirsk in the first years  of the Yeltsin regime and served as an investigator for the Eurasia Foundation's study of local democratic development. Professor Harris comments regularly on contemporary developments for KDKA and South Korean television.

Barry Ickes

Barry W. Ickes is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Research on International Financial and Energy Security (CRIFES) at the Pennsylvania State University, and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, Washington, DC. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a past President of the Association for Comparative Economics and former Chairman of the Board of the National Council of East European and Eurasian Studies. He was a co-founder of, and currently is a Board Member of the New Economic School in Moscow. He has published two books: Russia’s Virtual Economy, Brookings Institution Press, 2002, and Bear Traps on Russia’s Road to Modernization, Routledge, 2013, both co-authored with Clifford Gaddy.

Thomas F. Remington

 Thomas F. Remington is Goodrich C. White Professor of Political Science at Emory University. He received a PhD in political science from Yale University in 1978 and an MA in Russia and East European Studies from Yale in 1974. He is author of a number of books and articles on Russian and postcommunist politics. Among his publications are Presidential Decrees in Russia: A Comparative Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2014); The Politics of Inequality in Russia (Cambridge University Press, 2011); The Russian Parliament: Institutional Evolution in a Transitional Regime, 1989-1999 (Yale University Press, 2001); The Politics of Institutional Choice: Formation of the Russian State Duma (co-authored with Steven S. Smith) (Princeton University Press, 2001). Other books include Politics in Russia (7th edition, 2011); Parliaments in Transition (1994); and The Truth of Authority: Ideology and Communication in the Soviet Union (1988).

He is a past member of the Board of Trustees of the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research and of the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies. From 1993-2007 he was Advisor for Russia Workshops for the East-West Parliamentary Practice Project, based in Amsterdam. In that capacity he helped plan and direct a series of workshops for parliamentarians in numerous regions of Russia.

His research focuses on the development of political institutions in post-communist states, including parliamentary politics, legislative-executive relations, and labor market and social welfare institutions. In addition to courses dealing with Russian political development, he teaches courses in comparative political institutions and comparative political and economic reform. During the 2013-2014 academic year, he was a visiting scholar at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, where he is conducting research on the reform of social policy in Russia and China.

Andrei Tsygankov

Andrei P. Tsygankov is professor of international relations and political science at San Francisco State University. He is the author of Russia and the West from Alexander to Putin (2012) and The Strong State in Russia: Development and Crisis (forthcoming in November 2014).

He teaches Russian/post-Soviet, comparative, and international politics since August 2000. A Russian native, Tsygankov is a graduate of Moscow State University (Candidate of Sciences, 1991) and University of Southern California (Ph.D., 2000).

Tsygankov is a contributor to both Western and Russian academia. In the West, he co-edited collective projects, and he published National Identity and Foreign Economic Policy in the Post-Soviet World (2001), Russia's Perception of American Ideas after the Cold War (2004), and Anti-Russian Lobby and American Foreign Policy (2009), as well as many journal articles. Tsygankov also published well-received textbook Russia’s Foreign Policy (2006, the second edition, 2010, the third edition, 2013). In Russia, his best known books are Modern Political Regimes (1996), Russian Science of International Relations (2005, co-edited with Pavel Tsygankov, also published in Germany and China), Sociology of International Relations (2006, co-authored with Pavel Tsygankov, also published in China), and International Relations: Traditions of Russian Political Thought (2013). 

Tsygankov spoke at various forums at Berkeley, Stanford, World Affairs Council, and other venues in the Bay Area and outside, and he contributed to Current History, Los Angeles Times, Moscow Times, Politique étrangère,Russia in Global Affairs, Voice of Russia, and other media publications. Tsygankov consulted various publishers and state agencies, and he served as Program Chair of International Studies Association (ISA), 2006-07. ISA has well over three thousand members in North America and around the world and is the largest scholarly association in this field.

Judy Twigg

Judy Twigg is a Professor of Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University and Adjunct Associate Professor at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Her work focuses on issues of health, demographic change, and health care reform in Russia and other post-socialist countries.

She is currently a consultant for the World Bank, where she conducts evaluations of health, education, and social sector reform projects (most recently in Russia, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, and Macedonia); the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where she is a non-resident senior associate helping to organize collaborative health projects between U.S. and Russian public health professionals; and the U.S. government, where she conducts research on the foreign policy and security implications of health and demographic change in Russia.  She co-chairs the Steering Committee and the Public Health Working Group of the US-Russia Social Expertise Exchange program, housed at the Eurasia Foundation, which facilitates fellowships and projects linking US and Russian civil society.  She has also been a Senior Advisor to the Eurasia Program of the Social Science Research Council in New York.  She has testified as an expert witness before the U.S. Congress and has been a member of several Congressional advisory groups on Russian affairs. 

Twigg was a member of the 2005 Council on Foreign Relations Task Force on U.S.-Russia Relations, and one of 12 recipients of the 2005 State Council on Higher Education in Virginia’s Distinguished Faculty Award.  She received her Ph.D. in Political Science and Security Studies from MIT, an M.A. in Political Science and Russian and East European Studies from the University of Pittsburgh, and a B.S. in Physics from Carnegie Mellon University.

Stephen Wegren

Stephen K. Wegren received his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He is Professor in the political science department at SMU. Starting in Fall 2006, Professor Wegren became the Director for International and Area Studies. His most notable fellowships and honors include two grants from the National Council on Eurasian and East European Research; a Social Science Research Council Post-doctoral fellowship, a grant from OXFAM; several grants from IREX; and a grant from the Ford Foundation. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He is the author of more than 120 articles and book chapters on various aspects of political and economic reform in post-communist states. His single-authored and edited books include: Land Reform in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe (1998); Agriculture and the State in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia (1998), which won the Hewett award for best book in political economy from AAASS in 1999; Rural Reform in Post-Soviet Russia (2002); The Land Question in Ukraine and Russia (2002); Russian Policy Challenges: Security, Stability, and Development  (2003); Building Market Institutions in Post-Communist Agriculture: Land, Credit, and Assistance (2004); Russia’s Food Policies and Globalization (2005); The Moral Economy Reconsidered: Russia’s Search for Agrarian Capitalism (2005); Rural Adaptation in Russia (2005); Land Reform in Russia: Institutional Design and Behavioral Responses (2009); After Putin’s Russia (2010); Return to Putin’s Russia (2013); Rural Inequality In Divided Russia (2014); and Putin’s Russia (2015). He is currently working on a book on Russian food security.  

Harley Balzer

Recommended Readings:

Crotty, Jo, Sarah Marie Hall and Sergei Liubownikow, “Post-Soviet Civil Society Development in the Russiann Federation: The Impact of the NGO Law,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 96 No. 8, October 2014, pp. 1253-69.

 

Ferdinand, Peter, “Russia and China: Converging Responses to Globalization,” International Affairs, Vol. 83, No. 4 (2007), pp. 655-80.

 

Rutland, Peter, “Post-Socialist States and  the  Evolution  of  a New Development Model: Russia and  China Compared,” Paper presented at International Seminar on Globalizaion and Eurasia, Jawaharl Nehru University, New Delhi, 9-12 November 2008.

 

Dunn, Elizabeth C. and Michael S. Bobick, "The Empire Strikes Back: War without War and Occupation without Occupation in the Russian Sphere of Inflence,” American Ethnologist, Vol. 41, No. 3, August 2014, pp. 405-413

 

“Innovation in Russia and China Compared,” with Jon Askonas, forthcoming in Russian Analytical Digest, 2014

 

 

Boris Barkanov

Recommended Readings:

Olcott, Martha Brill, "Vladimir Putin and the Geopolitics of Oil," JAMES A. BAKER III INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY
RICE UNIVERSITY -OCTOBER 2004

Sussex, Matheew, "Strategic Security and Russian Resource Diplomacy," in  Russia and its Near Neighbours, eds. Freire, Maria Raquel andKanet, Roger E., Palgrave Macmillan, 2012

 

Abdelal, Rawi. "The Profits of Power: Commerce and Realpolitik in Eurasia." Review of International Political Economy 20, no. 3 (June 2013): 421–456. (available on JSTOR)

 

B. Nygren, Putin's Use of Natural Gas to Reintegrate the CIS Region, Problems of Post-Communism, ‎2008

 

 

A. Stulberg, Russia and the geopolitics of natural gas, PONARS, 2013

 


David Greene

 

Jonathan Harris

Recommended Readings:

Stephen White," Understanding Russian Politics" (2011) Chapters 1-3.

 

Thomas F. Remington

Recommended Readings:

Employment, Earnings, and Welfare in the Russian Transition by Thomas F. Remington.  Chapter 2 of Remington's The Politics of Inequality in Russia, 2011.
 
Negotiating Welfare in Postcommunist States by Linda J. Cook.  Published in Comparative Politics, Vol. 40, No. 1 (2007), pp. 41-62.
 

 

Andrei Tsygankov

Recommended Readings:

Vladimir Putin, Address by President of the Russian Federation. March 18, 2014 http://eng.kremlin.ru/news/6889


Jack Matlock, Ukraine: The Price of Internal Division
http://jackmatlock.com/2014/03/ukraine-the-price-of-internal-division/


Anatol Lieven, Ukraine should be a bridge, not a battleground
http://jackmatlock.com/2014/03/anatol-lieven-ukraine-should-be-a-bridge-not-a-battleground/

 

 

Judy Twigg

Recommended Readings:

The Dying Russians by Masha Gessen.  New York Review,  2014. 
http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2014/sep/02/dying-russians/ 

 8 Things Masha Gessen Got Wrong About Russian Demography by Mark Adomanis.  Forbes, 2014.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/markadomanis/2014/09/03/8-things-masha-gessen-got-wrong-about-russian-demography/

 

Stephen Wegren

Recommended Readings:

Wegren, S.K. (Ed.). (2012). Return to Putin's Russia: Past imperfect, future uncertain.  Plymouth, UK: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc. 

Rec Read Bookcover.pdf 

 

Barry Ickes

Recommended Readings:

"Russia's Dependence on Resources," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.


"Russia After the Global Financial Crisis," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.


"Putin's Protection Racket," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.

 

 

Russia Today

Class times: 5pm Friday, October 24, 2014 to 1:30pm Sunday, October 26, 2014 (100 Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University)

Russia Today is a one-credit (Pitt)/ three-unit (CMU) mini course, consisting of 14 hours of classes over a weekend, with a major paper assignment to be completed for credit. This course is created for undergraduate and graduate students. However, K-12 educators, business and community members are welcome to attend all or sections of the course for free. The course will open with two keynote lectures on Friday evening on an overview of the issues. This will be followed by instructional lectures on Saturday on the various themes by experts in the fields.  Sunday morning will be a discussion of two case studies and a panel discussion by the speakers on future challenges and some possible projections/ recommendations.

Motivation:

As global citizens, students need to have a working knowledge of other countries, which are important in shaping the corporate, social and political world. As a rising state in the world economy, Russia’s status in the business and in world affairs is shifting.

Course Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, the students will:

1. Have a general understanding of the corporate, geo-political, cultural and social factors that define Russia’s economic, cultural and technological landscape at the present time.

2. Explore one of these factors in depth, through the research paper.

Faculty presenters: Please visit the Speakers and Abstract tab 

Textbook:

Wegren, S.K. (Ed.). (2012). Return to Putin's Russia: Past imperfect, future uncertain.  Plymouth, UK: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc. 

Book will be available in the Pitt Book Center and Carnegie Melon University Bookstore. 

Description:

This short course will explore how various intersections of economy, society, and identity interact in Russia and in the perceived position of Russia as an emerging world economy. It will explore questions such as:

  • How does Russia's history and diversity reflect in the policies and the economy of Russia? In the way Russians react with the market?
  • What are today’s challenges in attaining equity in quality of life in Russia? What are some of its greatest needs?
  • What are impediments to Russia’s economic and business growth?
  • What are some of the salient features of the U.S.-Russian relations?
  • How have cultural traditions and modernizations integrated in Russia? What have been some cultural responses to globalization?
  • What lies ahead? What are the opportunities and challenges in Russia’s immediate future?

Assessment:

Due to the immersive nature of the course, students are expected to attend all sessions on all three days. Further, each student will be required to read the assigned book and develop a research paper on one dimension of modern Russia that has been introduced in class. The paper should be based on one of the topics covered in the course. The length of the term paper will be 5-10 pages, double spaced in 11 point font. Research papers are due by November 21 at 5:00pm and should be submitted through Carnegie Mellon's Blackboard or University of Pittsburgh’s Courseweb assignment tab for the course.

Sample topics for term papers include:

▪       Historical factors in the development of Russia’s market economy

▪       Factors that encourage or retard technological innovation in Russia

▪       The role of education in making Russia a world power

▪       Financing innovation in Russia: foreign, multinational, and Russian enterprises

▪       Education and innovation in Russia

▪       Ethnicity and educational opportunity

▪       Russia’s economy—communist, socialist, capitalist, or something else?

▪       Global forces impacting the Russian economy

▪       Global forces impacting the Russian education system

Audit Option:

Carnegie Mellon students may also audit the course by attending all the sessions, but not writing the paper. You should be sure to process an audit form, both if you are auditing from the beginning or later if you have decided not to do a paper and want your status changed from credit to audit. Pitt students may also audit but students must choose this option before the beginning of the course and it will not appear on your transcript as having taken the course. Once the course has started students will be graded based on how they signed up for the course.

Note: The paper is not a book or chapter review, but an overall analysis that demonstrates your reading and thinking on the subject. First articulate an organizing question that you will attempt to answer, and proceed from there to find sources. The organizing question has to be an exploration on one of the issues or aspects addressed by one or several speakers in the course.

As this is a generalist course, we don’t expect a detailed economic or political analysis, but a thorough literature review on the topic and your synthesis of these readings to answer the question with a critical perspective.

Instructors (responsible for grades and class organization): 

Professor Amy Burkert (ak11@andrew.cmu.edu) is responsible for grades at Carnegie Mellon UniversityAndrew Konitzer (konitzer@pitt.edu) and Veronica Dristas (dristas@pitt.edu) at the University of Pittsburgh, respectively. Please send an e-mail to us individually if you have questions regarding grades.

Sponsored by:  University of Pittsburgh: Global Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European StudiesDepartment of Economics, Katz Graduate School of Business, the Swanson School of Engineering, International Business Center, and College of Business Administration
    
Carnegie Mellon University: H. John Heinz III College, Office of the Provost,Division of Student Affairs
 

Harley Balzer

Recommended Readings:

Crotty, Jo, Sarah Marie Hall and Sergei Liubownikow, “Post-Soviet Civil Society Development in the Russiann Federation: The Impact of the NGO Law,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 96 No. 8, October 2014, pp. 1253-69.

 

Ferdinand, Peter, “Russia and China: Converging Responses to Globalization,” International Affairs, Vol. 83, No. 4 (2007), pp. 655-80.

 

Rutland, Peter, “Post-Socialist States and  the  Evolution  of  a New Development Model: Russia and  China Compared,” Paper presented at International Seminar on Globalizaion and Eurasia, Jawaharl Nehru University, New Delhi, 9-12 November 2008.

 

Dunn, Elizabeth C. and Michael S. Bobick, "The Empire Strikes Back: War without War and Occupation without Occupation in the Russian Sphere of Inflence,” American Ethnologist, Vol. 41, No. 3, August 2014, pp. 405-413

 

“Innovation in Russia and China Compared,” with Jon Askonas, forthcoming in Russian Analytical Digest, 2014

 

 

Boris Barkanov

Recommended Readings:

Olcott, Martha Brill, "Vladimir Putin and the Geopolitics of Oil," JAMES A. BAKER III INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY
RICE UNIVERSITY -OCTOBER 2004

Sussex, Matheew, "Strategic Security and Russian Resource Diplomacy," in  Russia and its Near Neighbours, eds. Freire, Maria Raquel andKanet, Roger E., Palgrave Macmillan, 2012

 

Abdelal, Rawi. "The Profits of Power: Commerce and Realpolitik in Eurasia." Review of International Political Economy 20, no. 3 (June 2013): 421–456. (available on JSTOR)

 

B. Nygren, Putin's Use of Natural Gas to Reintegrate the CIS Region, Problems of Post-Communism, ‎2008

 

 

A. Stulberg, Russia and the geopolitics of natural gas, PONARS, 2013

 


David Greene

 

Jonathan Harris

Recommended Readings:

Stephen White," Understanding Russian Politics" (2011) Chapters 1-3.

 

Thomas F. Remington

Recommended Readings:

Employment, Earnings, and Welfare in the Russian Transition by Thomas F. Remington.  Chapter 2 of Remington's The Politics of Inequality in Russia, 2011.
 
Negotiating Welfare in Postcommunist States by Linda J. Cook.  Published in Comparative Politics, Vol. 40, No. 1 (2007), pp. 41-62.
 

 

Andrei Tsygankov

Recommended Readings:

Vladimir Putin, Address by President of the Russian Federation. March 18, 2014 http://eng.kremlin.ru/news/6889


Jack Matlock, Ukraine: The Price of Internal Division
http://jackmatlock.com/2014/03/ukraine-the-price-of-internal-division/


Anatol Lieven, Ukraine should be a bridge, not a battleground
http://jackmatlock.com/2014/03/anatol-lieven-ukraine-should-be-a-bridge-not-a-battleground/

 

 

Judy Twigg

Recommended Readings:

The Dying Russians by Masha Gessen.  New York Review,  2014. 
http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2014/sep/02/dying-russians/ 

 8 Things Masha Gessen Got Wrong About Russian Demography by Mark Adomanis.  Forbes, 2014.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/markadomanis/2014/09/03/8-things-masha-gessen-got-wrong-about-russian-demography/

 

Stephen Wegren

Recommended Readings:

Wegren, S.K. (Ed.). (2012). Return to Putin's Russia: Past imperfect, future uncertain.  Plymouth, UK: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc. 

Rec Read Bookcover.pdf 

 

Barry Ickes

Recommended Readings:

"Russia's Dependence on Resources," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.


"Russia After the Global Financial Crisis," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.


"Putin's Protection Racket," by Clifford G. Gaddy and Barry W. Ickes.

 

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