Muslims in a Global Context

America

Friday, March 18, 2016 - Sunday, March 20, 2016

The United States of America

This one-credit mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around the world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community. The series seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim community around the world. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, and our partners at institutions around the world, the mini-course series seeks to have students, and all attendees, gain an understanding of the religious, cultural, economical and political influences of Muslims in a global context.  

For Non-Student Attendees:

All guests are welcome and the mini-course is free for non-students, but registration is required for everyone. Please visit the registration section for more information.

For Students: Course Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students will:

  1. Gain an understanding of history, governance, economics, law, gender education and political dimensions of the peoples and regions focused for each mini-course.
  2. Explore one of these factors, in depth, through a research paper.  

Textbook: Materials for students taking the course for credit will be available via Blackboard.

Description

The Muslims in the Global Context series offers the opportunity to examine the factors and trends that are having major impacts on these diverse regions and their relationships with other world regions and countries. The mini-courses consist of presentations on topics of critical importance to the understanding of Muslims in diverse regions of the world. In addition to attendance at all lectures, students enrolled for credit are required to develop and write a research paper on one of the themes of the mini-course and answer reflection prompts during the course. One-credit/3 units for CMU students is provided for the completion of each mini-course.

Assessment: Due to the immersive nature of the course, students are expected to attend all sessions on all three days. Further, each student will be required to read the assigned book and develop a research paper on one dimension of Muslims in a global context that has been introduced in class. The paper should be based on one of the topics covered in the course. The length of the research paper will be 5-10 pages, double spaced in 11 point font. Research papers are due by TBD and should be submitted through the University of Pittsburgh's Courseweb or Carnegie Mellon's Blackboard assignment tab for the course.

Audit Option: Carnegie Mellon students may also audit the course by attending all the sessions, but not writing the paper. You should be sure to process an audit form, both if you are auditing from the beginning or later if you have decided not to do a paper and want your status changed from credit to audit. Once the course has started students will be graded based on how they signed up for the course. University of Pittsburgh students must take the course for a letter grade. Students who wish to attend without earning credit may do so my registering as a community member.

Sponsored by: University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies Center, Political Science Department, and Carnegie Mellon University's Office of the Provost and Division of Student Affairs

For Further Reading and Research:

 

Zaheer Ali

Articles by Dr. Ali:

Zaheer Ali, “Return to Roots: African Americans Return to Islam Through Many Paths,” Islamic Horizons (July/August 2005): 16-35.

Recommended readings:

Turner, R. B. (2003). Islam in the african-american experience (2nd ed.). Bloomington, Ind: Indiana University Press.


 

Hatem Bazian

Please click on the link below to visit the Islamophobia Studies Journal's homepage, where you can dowload, as a PDF, the most current issue from Fall 2015.  http://crg.berkeley.edu/content/islamophobia/islamophobia-studies-journal

Led by Dr. Hatem Bazian, the Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project (IRDP) at the University of California, Berkeley highlights research and projects that explore the maintenance and extensi​on of existing power paradigms by bringing together academics, thinkers, practitioners and researchers from around the globe who engage, question and challenge the existing disparities in economic, political, social and cultural relations.  www.irdproject.com

Articles by Dr. Bazian:

http://www.hatembazian.com/tag/islamophobia/

A recent article on the American Studies Association Journal is also included on my site:

The Islamophobia Industry and the Demonization of Palestine: Implications for American Studies

Trump and the Islamophobia Imaginary

Recommended Readings:

The four volumes of the Islamophobia Studies Journal that can be downloaded free at the following link


 

Haider Hamoudi

Articles by Dr. Hamoudi:

Legal Pluralism and the Contemporary Muslim Experience
Shi'i Islam and the Contemporary Liberal State
The Muezzin's Call
Death of Islamic Law

Book Review of Islam and Liberal Citizenship

Recommended Readings:

Choudhury, C. (2012). Shari'ah Law as National Security Threat?. FIU Legal Studies Researach Paper Series. Research Paper No. 12-19

March, A. ((2007). Islamic Foundations for a Social Contract in non-Muslim Liberal Democaracirs. American Political Science Review. Vol.101, No 2. p.235-252

March, A. (2012). What Can the Islamic Past Teach Us about Secular Modernity?. Review of Wael Hallaq, The Impossible State: Isalm, Politics, and Modernity's Moral Predicament (Colombia University Press,2013) and Hussein Ali Agrama, Questioning Secularism: Islam, Soveriegnity, and the Rule of Law in Modern Egypt (University of Chicago Pres, 2012). p.1-10

Quraishi-Landes, A. (2015). The Sharia Problem with Sharia Legislation. Legal Studies Research Paper Series Paper No. 1361, 41 Ohio Northern University Law Review 545-566.


 

Altaf Husain

Articles by Dr. Husain:

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., & Husain, A. (2015). Developing a Model of Wellness among Muslims: Examining the Role of Spirituality. British Journal of Social Work, bcv099.

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., & Husain, A. (2015). Depression among Muslims in the United States: Examining the Role of Discrimination and Spirituality as Risk and Protective Factors. Social Work, 61(1), 45-52.

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., Husain, A., & Hong, P. Y. P. (2015). Correlates of Self-Rated Health Among Muslims in the United States. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services, 96(4), 284-291.

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., & Husain, A. (2015). Modeling the Relationships between Discrimination, Depression, Substance Use, and Spirituality with Muslims in the United States. Social Work Research, 39(4), 223-233.

Husain, A. (2015). Islamophobia: Anti-Islamic Bigotry. In C. Franklin (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Social Work Online. New York: National Association of Social Workers/Oxford University Press.

Husain, A. & Sherr, M. [Guest Co-Editors] (2015). Special Issue: Religion and Spirituality in Competency-Based Social Work Practice. Social Work & Christianity, 42(1).

Husain, A. & Sherr, M. [Guest Co-Editors] (2015). Introduction: Religion and Spirituality in Competency-Based Social Work Practice. Social Work & Christianity, 42(1), pp. 3-6.

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., & Husain, A. (2015). Validation of the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) With Muslims. Psychological Assessment (no pagination specified).

Ishizuka, K. E. & Husain, A. (2015). Anti-oppressive social work practices. In the Social Work Desk Reference. New York: Oxford University Press.

Husain, A. (2014). Serving Allah, Serving Humanity: Volunteerism Among Immigrant Muslims. In Y. Y. Haddad & J. I. Smith. The [Oxford] Handbook of American Islam. New York: Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199862634.013.029

Recommended Readings:
Abdo, G. (2006a) America’s Muslims aren’t as assimilated as you think. Washington Post Sunday, August 27, B30.

Abdo, G. (2006b). Islam in America: Separate but unequal. The Washington Quarterly, 28(4), 7-17.

Amer, M. M. & Hovey, J. D. (2007). Socio-demographic differences in acculturation and mental health for a sample of 2nd generation/early immigrant Arab Americans. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 9,335-347.

Aswat, Y. & Malcarne, V.L. (2007). Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim University students: Personal-family acculturation match. International Journal of Psychology 1(11), 1- 11.

Berry, J.W., Phinney, J., Sam, D.L. & Vedder, P. (2006). Immigrant youth in cultural transition: Acculturation, identity, and adaptation across national contexts. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Birman, D., & Trickett, E.J. (2001). Cultural transitions in first-generation immigrants: Acculturation of Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents and parents. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 32, 456 - 477.

Heyerdahl., S., Kvernmo, S., & Wichstrom, L.(2004). Self-reported behavioural/emotional problems in Norwegian adolescents from multiethnic areas. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 13: 64-72.

Hodge, D.R. (2002). Working with Muslim youths: understanding the values and beliefs of Islamic discourse. Children and Schools. 24, (1). 6-20.

Hodge, D. R., Zidan, T., & Husain, A. (2015). Depression among Muslims in the United States: Examining the Role of Discrimination and Spirituality as Risk and Protective Factors. Social Work, swv055.

Hodge, David R., Zidan, T & Husain, A. (2015). Validation of the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) with Muslims. Psychological assessment 27, no. 4 (2015): 1264.

Husain, A. (2015). Islamophobia: Anti-Islamic Bigotry. In Encyclopedia of Social Work. NASW: Oxford Press. Available at: http://socialwork.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.001.0...

Husain, A. and Ross-Sheriff, F. (2011). Cultural Competence with Muslim Americans. In D. Lum (ed.). Culturally Competent Practice, 4th edition (pp. 358-390). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

Kwak, K. (2003). Adolescents and their parents: a review of intergenerational family relations for immigrant and non-immigrant families. Human Development. 46, (2/3). 115-136.

Levitt, P. (2004). Redefining the boundaries of belonging: The institutional character of transnational religious life. Sociology of Religion, 65(1), 1 – 18.

Liebkind, K., Jasinkaja-Lahti, I., & Solheim, E. (2004) Cultural identity, perceived Discrimination and parental support as determinants of immigrants’ school Adjustment: Vietnamese youth in Finland. Journal of Adolescent Research, 19, 635-656.

Murad, S.D., Joung, I.M., Verhulst, F.C., Mackenbach, J.P., Crijnen, A.A. (2004). Determinants of self-reported emotional and behavioral problems in Turkish immigrant adolescents aged 11 – 18. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. 42 (1) 196 – 207.

Oppedal, B., Rosamb, E., & Sam, D.L. (2004). The effect of acculturation and social support on change in mental health among young immigrants. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 28, 481-494.

Peek, L. (2005) Becoming Muslim: The development of a religious identity. Sociology of Religion, 66(3), 215–242.
Phinney, J., Berry, J.W., Vedder, P., & Liebkind, K. (2006). The acculturation experience: Attitudes, identities, and behaviors of immigrant youth. In J.W. Berry, J.S. Phinney, D.L. Sam, & P. Vedder (Eds.) Immigrant youth in cultural transition: cculturation, identity, and adaptation across national contexts. PP 71-116. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Pine, B. & Drachman, D. (2005). Effective child welfare practice with immigrant and refugee children and their families. Child Welfare, 84(5), 537-562.

Sam, D.L., Vedder, P. Ward, C. &, Horenczyk, G. (2006). Psychological and sociocultural adaptation of immigrant youth. In J.W. Berry, J.S. Phinney, D.L. Sam, & P. Vedder (Eds.) Immigrant youth in cultural transition: Acculturation, identity, and adaptation across national contexts. PP 117-141. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc

Tartar, M. (1998). "Counseling Immigrants: School Contexts and Emerging Strategies." British Journal of Guidance Counseling 26: 337– 352.

Ulman, C., & Tartar, M. (2001). Psychological adjustment among Israeli adolescent Immigrants: A report on life satisfaction, self-concept, and self-esteem. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 30, 4449-463.

van de Vijver, F. Helms-Lorenz, M. & Feltzer, M. (1999). Acculturation and cognitive performance of migrant children in the Netherlands. International Journal of Psychology, 34, 149 – 162.

Vedder, P. & van de Vijver, F.J.R. (2006). Methodological aspects: studying adolescents in 13 countries. In J.W. Berry, J.S.

Phinney, D.L. Sam, & P. Vedder (Eds.) Immigrant youth in cultural transition: Acculturation, identity, and adaptation across national contexts. PP 47-69. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Verkuyten, M. & Yildiz, A.A. (2007). National (dis)identification, and ethnic and religious identity: A study among Turkish-Dutch Muslims. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 33 (1448) 1 – 15.

Virta E., Sam, D., & Westin, C. (2004). Adolescents with Turkish background in Norway and Sweden: A comparative study of their psychological adaptation. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. 45, 15 – 25.

Ying, Y. & Han, M. (2006). The effect of intergenerational conflict and school-based racial discrimination on depression and academic achievement in Filipino American adolescents. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, 4(4), 19-35.


 

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer

Articles by Dr. Khabeer:
Khabeer, Suad (2007) Rep that Islam: The Rhyme and Reason of American islamic Hip Hop, The Muslim World, Volume 97, 125-141.

Recommended Readings:
H. Samy Alim (2006) Re-inventing Islam with Unique Modern Tone: Muslim Hip Hop Artists as Verbal Mujahidin, Souls, 8:4, 45-58, DOI: 10.1080/10999940601057341


 

Saeed A. Khan

Articles by Dr. Khan:

Khan, S. and Beutel, A. (2014) Manufacturing Bigotry: A State-by-State Legislative Effort to Pushback Against 2050 by Targeting Muslims and Other Minorities, Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, 1-8

Recommended readings:

Beutel, A. and Jankovic, J. (2015) Strength Through Diversity: Four Cases of Local and State Level Coalition Success, Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, 1-51

GhaneaBassiri, K. (2012) Writing Histories of Western Muslims, Review of Middles East Studies, Vol 46, No. 2, 17-179

Uddin, A. (2014) Religious Freedom and Discrimination in America-Then and Now: Lesson Learned for American Muslim and their Allies, Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, 1-8


 

Dalia Mogahed

Articles and Videos by Ms. Mogahed:

What do you think when you look at me?
Dalia Mogahed on Meet the Press Daily on impact of Paris Attacks on Muslim Americans

Full Interview: Dalia Mogahed on The Daily Show

Global Rally for Humanity is anti-American
Islamophobia is Made Up

 

 

 

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