Events


View a comprehensive calendar of events.

Tuesday, September 25

Did Prussia have an Atlantic History? The Partitions of Poland-Lithuania, French Guiana, and Climates in the Caribbean, 1760s-1790s
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Bernhard Struck, University of St. Andrews
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall (History Department Lounge)
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of

Thursday, September 27

Communist Neverland: New Research on a Russian International Children's Home, 1933-1991
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Elizabeth McGuire, California State East Bay
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

From 1933 to 1991, Communist Party leaders from all over the world -- including Mao Zedong, Eugene Dennis, Josip Broz Tito, and many more from Latin America to Africa to the Middle East to the Far East -- sent their children to be educated in a single boarding school in Ivanovo, Russia. They were raised linguistically and culturally as Russians, often forgetting their native tongue. Many continue to feel enormous affection and nostalgia for the place they consider their true home, and travel across continents to attend reunions every five years. Based on archival documents, the school's own private archive, and dozens of interviews with alumni across the world, Communist Neverland is the tale of this remarkable school, which tells a new story about the people who dedicated their lives to world revolution.

Monday, October 1

Memory Conflicts as Barrier to Reconciliation: Post-Soviet Disputes between Baltic States and Russia
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Katja Wezel, Reseach Associate, University of Gottingen, Germany
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center

In 2009, the Estonian political scientists Pirat Shin and Wiki Berg argued that "the permafrost in Baltic-Russian relations shows no signs of melting." This talk will analyze why post-Soviet Baltic-Russian relations have been so difficult and how different interpretations of history play a key role.

Thursday, October 4

Innocent Weapons: Soviet and American Children in the Cold War
A Live Interview with Margaret Peacock, University of Alabama
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Sean Guillory and Margaret Peacock
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In the 1950s and 1960s, images of children appeared everywhere, from movies to milk cartons, their smiling faces used to sell everything, including war. Soviet and American leaders too used emotionally charged images of children to create popular support for their policies at home and abroad. This live interview with Margaret Peacock will discuss her work on the deep symmetry in how Soviet and American propagandists mobilized similar images of children to similar ends, despite their differences.

Wednesday, October 10

Red Children’s Republics: Socialist Internationalism and Transnational Youth Exchanges During the Late Cold War
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Diana Georgescu, University College London
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The talk examines the widespread practice of youth exchanges during the late Cold War through two seemingly peripheral actors: the Romanian Pioneers, the children’s organization of the Romanian Communist Party, and one of its most active partners in the west, the International Falcons Movement, a leftwing youth organization with national branches in Germany, Austria, the United Kingdom, and France. Following Romanian and foreign teens who traveled as cultural ambassadors to youth camps organized in the Soviet bloc and Western Europe, the talk examines competing visions and practices of socialist internationalism in order to illuminate the role of “soft power” during the Cold War.

The Geography of German Prisoner of War Camps in the Soviet Union
Industry, Infrastructure, and the Environment
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Susan Grunewald, CMU, Doctoral Student in History
Location:
6142 Scott Hall, Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Union Studies Association on behalf of Carnegie Mellon University
Cost:
Free and open to the public

The paper examines German prisoner of war (POW) camps in the Soviet Union from 1941-1956. The Germans were the largest and longest held group of POWs of any of the victor nations of the Second World War. The key research question is why were they held for so long? The paper argues that the POWs were primarily held for economic reasons related to the mass destruction of the war. To support this argument, the paper heavily relies on GIS mapping of the POW camp locations in relation to Soviet infrastructure and environmental resources. The paper provides a detailed methodological breakdown of the mapping process in addition to analysis of the maps.

Susan Grunewald (CMU, Doctoral Student in History), with a response from John Walsh (French and Italian)

Saturday, October 13

UCIS 50th Anniversary Celebration
Time:
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
UCIS
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 1st Floor Commons
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, International Week, Nationality Rooms, Office of International Services and Study Abroad Office
Contact:
Jeff Whitehead
Contact Email:
whitehead@pitt.edu

In 1968, the University Center for International Studies (UCIS) was created as the University of Pittsburgh’s encompassing framework for all its multidisciplinary international programs. To commemorate our 50th anniversary, we will be holding a celebration open to both the University and larger Pittsburgh community.

Join us for an afternoon of international performances, sweet treats from around the globe, children’s activities, and more!

Thursday, October 18

Soviet Hippies, dir. Terje Toomistu
Time:
4:00 pm
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

A wild flower power ride on the footprints of the Soviet hippie movement take you into the psychedelic underground of 1970s.

Global Trivia
Time:
9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Presenter:
International Week
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Week
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

Come join us for our 4th annual Global Trivia Night! Compete with groups of up to five undergraduate students, and test your knowledge in global categories like Global Current Affairs, World Culture, World History, Geography, and more. Prizes include Apple Watches, Beats headphones, and Chipotle gift cards. Free food and beverages will be provided! Registration will close on Wednesday, October 17th at 11:59 PM, or once capacity is reached.

To register your team: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScqsn3oL2Hrg5eC09O7FTwY5DrSG_y8...

For more information on all things International Week: https://www.internationalweek.pitt.edu/

Thursday, October 25 to Sunday, October 28

Central Eurasian Studies Society
Time:
(All day)
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley

Friday, October 26

The Power of Evidence-Based Research in Policy-Making: Lessons from Afghanistan
Keynote Address for the Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Orzala Nemat
Location:
David Lawrence Hall 121
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), School of Education, World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press and Central Eurasian Studies Society
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126477407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Conference registration required.

Dr. Orzala Nemat is an internationally known Afghan scholar and a life time activist recognized for being an expert in political ethnography. Her research focuses on the political economy of governance interventions in conflict affected settings highlighting local governance relations in Afghanistan’s villages resulting from the policies of transnational/international institutions and central government’s development and political interventions.

Saturday, October 27

Majlis Podcast: Central Asia in Current Affairs
Time:
12:45 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), The World History Center, the University of Pittsburgh Press, and the School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126477407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The Majlis Podcast is Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty's in-depth weekly current affairs talk show focusing on Central Asia.

Hosted and produced by Muhammad Tahir, RFE/RL's Media Relations Manager, every week the podcast brings the most relevant experts to discuss the pressing issues of the day involving its target region.

As part of the Special Events Series of the 2018 conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society, RFE/RL will record an episode on a current affairs topic with discussants and a live audience.

Conference registration is NOT required.

Premiere with Q&A: Ingushetia, the Speech of the Voiceless
CESS 2018 @ Pitt Special Events Series
Time:
5:30 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), The World History Center, the University of Pittsburgh Press, and the School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126477407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The conflict in the North Caucasus has echoed throughout the Middle East, Europe, and even in the USA (Boston bombing). The Russians claim it is just another page of the war on terror.

The general consensus is that the conflict has its origins in Muslim resistance to Russian colonization in the 19th century, known as the Caucasian war. Is it actually that simple though? No one doubts that the Caucasian war took place, but was the resistance really Muslim?

For 200 years, one Caucasian nation has been denied the possibility to be heard: Ingushetia. Now, it is time to let them tell their story. Ingushetia: The Speech Of The Voiceless is a documentary produced on the basis over 10 years' worth of research. It presents the discovery of the evolution of Ingushetia from a democratic nation to the one put in a context of Russia's war on terror. The premiere of the documentary will be followed by a Q&A session with Mr. Magomet Albakov, one of the key figures behind this documentary.

While open to the broader public, this documentary will be of special interest to those studying Ingushetia and the Caucasus, the Caucasian War, the Crimean War, or Russia's war on terror.

Ingushetia: The Speech Of The Voiceless is part of the Special Events Series of the 2018 Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. Registration at CESS 2018 is NOT required.

Screening and Panel Discussion: Not in Our Name
CESS 2018 @ Pitt Special Events Series
Time:
7:30 pm
Presenter:
Multiple
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press, School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
4126477407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

An initiative of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Not in Our Name is the first documentary project ever produced on counter-extremism in Central Asia. With the goal of empowering communities to stand up to violent extremist recruiters who claim to represent them, the RFE/RL team traveled to diverse regions and explored how residents can work together from the local to the national level to prevent the spread of violence. Not in Our Name features video portraits of those who lost family members in Syria and Irak and follows discussions among youth from Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan as young people in these countries reflect on experiences from a nearby conflict in town hall meetings.

The challenge Central Asian communities face from extremist groups is real. According to recent estimates, countries of the former Soviet Union were the single largest source of foreign fighters in the Syria/Iraq conflict -- more than neighboring states in the Middle East. With over 4,200 Central Asians joining the conflict, communities across the region have been and will continue to be exposed to the horrors of war and extremist ideological tendencies. The documentary follows Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tajik, and Uzbek youth as they come to a deeper understanding of the challenges they face and consider what their options for collective action so that their communities can take a stand and declare "Not in Our Name."

This event is part of the Special Events Series of the 2018 Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with contributors. Conference registration is NOT required.

Moderator: Muhammad Tahir, Media Relations Manager, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Thursday, November 1

Children 404, dir. Pavel Loparev and Askold Kurov
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In response to Russian leader Vladimir Putin’s 2013 outlawing of “gay propaganda,” activist Elena Klimova created Children 404, an online forum for Russian-speaking LGBTQ teens.

Monday, November 5

Global Migration: The Case of the Volhynian Germans
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Jan Musekamp, DAAD Visiting Associate Professor
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall (History Department Lounge)
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of

Tuesday, November 6

Traces in the Snow, dir. Vladimir Kozlov
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The world's first documentary about Siberia's punk rock scene in the 1980s. It was a phenomenon of those times that this music existed thousands of miles away from the movement's epicenters in New York and London.

Wednesday, November 14

An Education in Diaspora: African Students in the USSR and the Queer Contours of Socialist Friendship in Sissako's "October" and "Rostov-Luanda
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Jennifer Wilson, Ohio State University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In “Oktyabr (October)” (1993) and “Rostov-Luanda” (1998), the Mauritanian film director Abderrahmane Sissako shines a light on the experiences of African students in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Sissako, like many young Africans at the time, studied in the Soviet Union in the 1980s on a “Socialist Friendship” scholarship, making these two very different films, one a work of fiction, the other a pseudo-documentary, divergent experiments in documenting the displaced self. Working within the frameworks of diasporic intimacy and queer diaspora, this talk explores “Oktyabr” and “Rostov-Luanda” as meditations on the uniquely constructed intinerancy of black communities in the Soviet Union, a distinctly "queer" transience all the more intensified by the peripatetic nature of student life.

Tuesday, November 27

Youth's Revolt against the Non-Democratic Regimes
A Live Interview with Olena Nikolayenko, Fordham University
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Sean Guillory and Olena Nikolayenko
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

At the turn of the twenty-first century, a tide of nonviolent youth movements swept across Eastern Europe demanding political change in repressive political regimes in Serbia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, and Ukraine that emerged since the collapse of communism. This live interview with Olena Nikolayenko will discuss these youth movements and their ability to mobilize citizens against the authoritarian governments on the eve of national elections.

Friday, March 22 to Saturday, March 23

Symposium | Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Varies
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at http://soyuz.americananthro.org/symposium/.

Thursday, April 4 to Saturday, April 6

American Hungarian Educators Association - 44th Annual Conference
Time:
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies