Events in UCIS

Monday, March 19

10:00 am Conference
Seminar on Cultures of the Lusosphere
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and The Brazilian Consulate in New York
See Details

For more information on event, please visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/lusosphere-seminar

12:00 pm Information Session
UCIS Chat & Chew #4
Location:
#700 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Director's Office
See Details

For Students enrolled in UCIS Certificates

The University Center for International Studies would like to invite you to join us for lunch or dinner at one of our upcoming UCIS Chat & Chew sessions--March 12-20, 2018.

We are interested in hearing about your experiences with your certificate program so far and eager to hear your feedback on the new Suitable and E-portfolio features of myPittGlobal.

If you have 90 minutes to spare over lunch or dinner, please join us for food and conversation. Your participation will also earn you points toward the "Collaboration and Communications" competency in myPittGlobal(Suitable)!

Thanks for making the time to help us to personalize your experience with our programs!

1:00 pm Lecture
Garhwali Folk Traditions in 21st Century India
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Garhwal is a rich and diverse cultural region in Uttarakhand in the Himalaya mountains of North India. Following political agitation for separation from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand was established in 2000 as the 27th state within the Republic of India. Much of the Garhwal region can be understood both in terms of the sacred landscape of the Himalaya and in terms of intense pressure to develop infrastructure for pilgrimage, tourism, and economic growth. This pressure has had a profound impact on the fragile environment, on the cultural history of folk traditions in the mountains, and on the lives of musicians, artists, bards, and poets, who have been displaced by the construction of dams, by flooding caused by deforestation, and because of road construction to accommodate pilgrims and tourists.

Professor Datta Ram Purohit, Garhwal's leading authority on the performing arts, recognized poet in the tradition of Garhwali bards, and accomplished director of the regions theatrical tradition, Pandava Lila, will speak on these issues, with specific reference to a catastrophic flood in the sacred Kedarnath Valley, 2013.

3:00 pm Lecture
Syndemic Diabetes: Entanglements with Poverty, Trauma, and AIDS
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Mendenhall will introduce the concept of syndics, a theory of how social and health problems travel together within and between populations. She will discuss the concept of syndemic diabetes (type 2) through the discussion of her mixed methods research among low-income urban communities int he United States, India, South Africa, and Kenya. In doing so, she argues that it is impossible to understand diabetes in such contexts without taking seriously the implications of poverty, trauma, mental illness, and AIDS.

4:30 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Department of History
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China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway

Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University

Professor Jamie Monson became interested in Africa when she served as an agriculture volunteer for the Peace Corps in rural Kenya in 1980. She then completed her PhD in African History at UCLA, and took her first teaching position at Carleton College in 1991. In 2015, she accepted a position as a Professor of African History in the Department of History and Director of African Studies at Michigan State University. Monson’s early research focus was on agricultural and environmental history of southern Tanzania, and she has also worked on anti-colonial warfare in German East Africa. In the late 1990s, she began a new research project on the history of the TAZARA railway, built with Chinese development aid in Tanzania and Zambia in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Africa’s Freedom Railway, was published by Indiana University Press in 2011.

Most recently, Monson has been studying the history of China-Africa relations (and learning Chinese), and frequently performs research in China. Her new project is a study of technology transfer in the history of Chinese development assistance to Africa. A second project that she is also engaged in uses records of visits made by African women’s delegations to China during the Cultural Revolution to examine gendered aspects of civil diplomacy.

5:05 pm Film
Yemanjá: Wisdom from the African Heart of Brazil
Location:
Gold Room--University Club
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center along with University Center for Int'l Studies, Africana Studies Department, Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Film Studies, Humanities Center and Consulado do Brazil--New York
See Details

A documentary film about the condomble spiritual culture of Bahia, Brazil. Grounded in strong community and Earth-Based wisdom, this vibrant tradition evolved the ways of enslaved Africans. The film explores Candomblé's history, social challenges and triumphs through the voices of extraordinary women leaders, including the film's narrator Alice Walker.

Free and open to the public.