Events in UCIS

Thursday, March 22 until Sunday, April 8

(All day) Festival
2018 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Humanities Center at Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

The mission of the Carnegie Mellon International “Faces” Film Festival is to engage the Pittsburgh community with all-encompassing programming that promotes cultural exchange and expression, and through film, illuminates the local and global ethnic communities which seldom have opportunities to celebrate their artwork and culture on a large public scale. By collaborating with guest filmmakers, arts organizations, and local businesses, the festival creates a platform for these ethnic groups to expose the Pittsburgh community to their cultures, allows attendees to identify and relate to their own origins, and for cinematic artists to engage audiences with their films and dialogues.

Monday, April 2

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

4:30 pm Lecture
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Imperialism in Asian Waters
Location:
History Department Lounge, 3703 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of History

Tuesday, April 3

4:00 pm Lecture
1968: The Year that Rocked Pittsburgh
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with University Honors College
See Details

Presented by Emily Ruby or the Heinz History Center. Part of the Global Legacies of 1968 Series, sponsored by the University Honors College.

6:30 pm Film
Red Gringo (Chile)
Location:
G-23 Public Health Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Red Gringo (Miguel Angel Vidaurre & Will Roberts, Chile, 2016)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie
Free and open to the public!

The North American singer Dean Reed travels to Chile in 1962, with the hope of making the most of the fame gained with a couple of radio hits. Deeply shocked by the political and social issues of the country, he decides to travel through Latin America giving concerts, shooting films and making photo stories. In the meantime he suffers an ideological transformation that will lead him to excentric ways of political commitment. 'Gringo Rojo' is a pop memory exercise that gathers all the pieces of his life in Chile and the rest of the world.

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

8:00 pm Film
After Spring
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

With the Syrian conflict now in its seventh year, millions of people continue to be displaced. AFTER SPRING is the story of what happens next. By following two refugee families in transition and aid workers fighting to keep the camp running, viewers will experience what it is like to live in Zaatari, the largest camp for Syrian refugees. With no end in sight for the conflict or this refugee crisis, everyone must decide if they can rebuild their lives in a place that was never meant to be permanent.

Wednesday, April 4

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa Series: Hang Them! Popular Music and the Politics of Participation and Belonging in Homophobic Uganda
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Hang Them! Popular Music and the Politics of Participation and Belonging in Homophobic Uganda

Wednesday April 4, 2018 - 12 – 1:30pm - 4130 WWPH

Dr. Charles Lwanga is a recent graduate of the School of Music He holds a Ph.D in Composition and Theory (2012) and a Ph.D in Ethnomusicology (2018) from the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently a visiting assistant professor of Music at Skidmore College in New York where he teaches theory and ethnomusicology. He will be sharing his research and work experience as a composer.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session we will read Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie and hear from Pitt Prof. Jeanette Jouili (Religious Studies).

Thursday, April 5

(All day) Deadline--Call for Papers/Symposium
XIV Undergraduate Research Symposium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with and the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), Hispanic Languages and Literature and Literarure, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and University Honors College
See Details

April 5, 2018

Symposium

XVI Undergraduate Research Symposium

Undergraduate Opportunity!
Call for Papers (Deadline for submissions: March 12, 2018)

Submit a 150-200 word abstract to the following address:
hllugrad@pitt.edu

12:30 pm Lecture
The Rule of Law Around the World (Part II)
Location:
Barco Law Building Room 113
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Center for International Legal Education
See Details

Continuing a long tradition at the Center for International Legal Education (CILE), this is the second of two sessions this year in which Pitt Law LLM students will talk to the Pitt Law community about the legal systems and rule of law challenges of their home countries.

Featured Presentations:

An Overview of Recent Changes in Saudi Arabia, presented by Yazeed Al-Begaishy, Abdulrahman Almuhaydib, and Rahaf Zaini (Saudi Arabia)
The U.S. And Cameroonian Approaches to Democracy and the Rule of Law, presented by Patrick Dongmo Tsague (Cameroon)

6:00 pm Cultural Event/Student Club Activity
Italian Cheese Night
Location:
Cathedral Views Gallery - Alumni Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Pitt Italian Club
See Details

Pitt Italian Club is hosting a Cheese Night on Thurs, April 5th at the Cathedral Views Gallery in Alumni Hall at 6-7pm. The event is free to all Pitt students and costs $2 per non-Pitt student. The Cheese Night is right before the opening film of the Italian Film Festival on the same night, so participants are welcome to stay to watch the film after the event.

Register to attend at Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cheese-night-tickets-43317661291

6:00 pm Lecture
Two Evenings at Pitt
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures
See Details

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

9:00 pm Lecture
Cool Japan: Animation in Japan
Location:
358 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Pitt Anime Club and Pittsburgh Japanese Culture Society
See Details

Charles Dunbar is an anthropologist. He studies a lot of things, be it fandom, anime culture, the supernatural or mysterious men in blue boxes. He received his MA in Sociocultural Anthropology in 2011, after utilizing ancient Mayan techniques to hypnotize his department into believing that he was, in fact, the reincarnation of Victor Turner. His thesis, entitled “Pilgrimage, Pageantry and Fan Communities," was published soon after, and focused on anime convention participation, including stereotyping, spending habits, cosplay and con culture.

Thursday, April 5 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Friday, April 6

(All day) Symposium
Pitt/Penn State Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium
Location:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.

A wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community are encouraged. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.
Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Center for Global Studies' website.

**Abstracts Due March 12th**

Submit abstracts here: https://goo.gl/p6DiQR

Students should contact Elaine Linn at eel58@pitt.edu for more information or visit the GSC website.

1:00 pm Symposium
Documenting Diasporas: Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinos
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS), Africana Studies Department, the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures and Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
See Details

Documenting Diasporas: Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinos
Symposium 04/06
1:00-6:00 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall

Features Panelists:
Dr. Sherwin Bryant, African American Studies, Northwestern University
Dr. Kia Lilly Caldwell, African American Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill
Dr. Jennifer A. Jones, Sociology, Notre Dame University
Dr. Solsiree Del Moral, American Studies, Amherst College

African-descended populations in Latin America total over 150 million and nearly one quarter of the 57 million Latinos in the U.S. identify as Afro-Latino. This symposium highlights the range of sources – archival, literary, oral, digital, and visual – that researchers engage to analyze historical and contemporary diasporic experiences of Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinos.

For more information, email: pittmrv@gmail.com or lavst12@pitt.edu

1:30 pm Career Counselling
UCIS International Toolkit Series: Teaching English Abroad
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

China, Thailand, Egypt, Japan, Ukraine, Bahrain, Ethiopia, United Arab Emirates and Taiwan… What do these places have in common? The opportunity to travel, experience new cultures, and teach English!

Learn about ways to teach abroad, resources to search for jobs, organizations that you can volunteer/intern at to gain teaching experience, and how to prepare for an exciting job while at school!

Join UCIS for this year’s last International Career Toolkit Series on Teaching English Abroad! Hear from a panel of speakers who have taught across the world in different capacities. Our panel has taught English through the Peace Corps, government exchange programs, on contract with local schools, and online.

8:00 pm Student Club Activity
An Evening with Maranie Rae: Refugee Photographer
Location:
837 William Pitt Union
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of FORGE
See Details

Maranie Rae is a Pittsburgh-based photographer and journalist. Her work focuses on marginalized individuals and those displaced by violence and war. She will share her photographs, experiences, and stores from her past working with refugees through organizations including Doctors Without Borders.

All are welcome! Free pizza provided.

Saturday, April 7

9:00 am Teacher Training
Global Interdisciplinary Working Group
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

We are currently accepting applications from teams of 2-4 teachers. We will meet three Saturday mornings (3/3, 4/7, and 5/5) from 9-12noon, and new content must be taught in the 2018-2019 school year. At each meeting, you will work intensively with your teammates, receive feedback from other participants, and learn about strategies for interdisciplinary teaching. We welcome teams that include teachers, librarians, curriculum development specialists, and/or administrative personnel. Ideally, each member of the team should interact with the same group of students.

9:00 am Curriculum Development/Teacher Training
Interdisciplinary Global Working Group for Educators
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

What does it mean for a course, module, or lesson to be “global’? In part, it means looking at a question from multiple lenses—whether political, economic, social, cultural, ecological, or other. What better way to approach global curriculum planning (and to model collaborative learning for our students!) than to partner with colleagues from other disciplines in the same school? The University Center for International Studies at Pitt is offering a new program that will provide teachers with the time, space, and material support to gather with like-minded colleagues and (re)design an interdisciplinary, global unit or lesson. Science and French teachers might team up to offer a lesson on global warming in the francophone world; or Art, English, and Social Studies teachers might develop a unit on responses to the global refugee crisis in art and literature. We are looking forward to hearing your ideas!

Free parking, Act 48 credit hours, $300 stipend, and a mini-grant (up to $200 for your team) for curricular materials of your choosing.

7:00 pm Lecture
Speaker Event: MariNaomi
Location:
William Pitt Union Lower Lounge
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Multiracial Student Association and Asian Student Alliance
See Details

MariNaomi is an award-winning Japanese American artist and author whose memoir, Turning Japanese, explores her identity and experiences of being a person of Asian descent in American and the experiences of being an Asian American in Japan.

She will be giving a reading from her memoir and sharing her experiences with heritage and representation in the media. The goal of this event is promote dialogue at Pitt about experiences with multiculturalism and intersectionality.

Sunday, April 8

4:00 pm Film
Human Flow
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with CMU International Film Festival Sponsors
See Details

Human Flow is an epic portrait of mass migration that understands how a lack of empathy often stems from a failure of imagination.”

- David Ehrlich, Indiewire

Artist, activist, and director Ai Weiwei captures the worldwide refugee crisis in this breathtakingly epic journey. In this global point of view, Weiwei visits 23 different countries to follow refugees’ quest for things every human needs: safety, shelter, peace, and the opportunity to be who we are.

Ai Weiwei is a renowned artist born in Beijing and currently works in both Beijing and Berlin. Ai is known for working in a variety of mediums, from architecture to installations, social media to documentaries, to express new ways to examine global society and its values. Recent exhibitions include: Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., translocation - transformation at 21er Haus in Vienna, and #SafePassage at Foam in Amsterdam. He currently serves as the Einstein Visiting Professor at the Berlin University of the Arts. Ai has made numerous award-winning documentaries about social and political issues, including Disturbing the Peace (2009), So Sorry (2012), and Ai Weiwei’s Appeal ¥15,220,910.50 (2014).

5:00 pm Film
Spectacles: The Film Series
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 407
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Religious Studies Department
See Details

Once a month, Spectacles invites religious studies, cultural studies, and film studies enthusiasts to join together and watch a movie with religious themes. Afterwards, religious studies majors will lead an open discussion about the movie. And of course, there will be snacks! This month, we will be showing our final movie of the semester.

Please refer to the religious studies website (http://www.religiousstudies.pitt.edu/), or the facebook event (https://www.facebook.com/events/186840558738323/) for more details.

6:00 pm Film
Screening of Satyajit Ray’s film: Pather Panchali
Location:
REGENT SQUARE THEATRE
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of University of Pittsburgh Film and Media Studies Program, Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and Silk Screen Film Festival
See Details

Introduced by Kuhu Tanvir, PhD student in Film and Media Studies.

Satyajit Ray’s 1955 debut of Pather Panchali introduced an eloquent and important new cinematic voice that made itself heard all over the world. A depiction of rural Bengali life in a style inspired by Italian neorealism, this naturalistic but poetic evocation of a number of years in the life of a family introduces us to both little Apu and, just as essentially, the women who will help shape him: his independent older sister, Durga; his harried mother, Sarbajaya, who, with her husband away, must hold the family together; and his kindly and mischievous elderly “auntie,” Indir—vivid, multifaceted characters all. With resplendent photography informed by its young protagonist’s perpetual sense of discovery, Pather Panchali, which won an award for Best Human Document at Cannes, is an immersive cinematic experience and a film of elemental power. Satyajit Ray, India, 1955, 2h 5min

This film is part of the Classic Asian Film Series held weekly at Regent Square.
Admission $8

Tuesday, April 10

12:00 pm Presentation
2018 Symposium Series: Connecting the Local and the Global I
Location:
4119 Wesley W. Posvar Hall (IISE Seminar Room)
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Institute for International Education
See Details

This event is free and open to public. Two presentations will be given on that day:
Challenging Car Culture: Shifting Bikes into the US Cultural Norm-- by SCAE Ph.D. student, Christopher Chirdon
A Qualitative Study on the Knowledge Structure of Front-Line Workers in Service Occupations-- by IISE Visiting Scholar, Zheng Li

4:30 pm Workshop
Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Wednesday, April 11

12:00 pm Workshop
Professional Development Webinars - Doing Research on Eastern Europe in the EU: Research Infrastructures, Grant Models, and Career Mobility
Location:
http://aseees.org/programs/webinars
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe
See Details

This webinar is the third in a professional development series co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center. This webinar will focus on career patterns in academia as well as in the field of infrastructure development in EU-countries. Participants will learn about the formats, chances and challenges for developing a strategy for one’s transnational career path. Against this backdrop and providing significant examples, Peter Haslinger will explain about bilateral and cross-European funding programs - this will also include some thoughts about advancing transatlantic exchange in the field of Eastern European Studies.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Webinars scheduled for Fall 2018:

August
How to Work in Archives in Eastern Europe and Germany

September
Archival Skills

October
Strategies for Career Building and Publishing in the EU versus the US

6:00 pm Lecture
The Tucci-Cornetti Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian Languages and Literatures, Department of Theatre Arts, Humanities Center and University Honors College
See Details

Gianni Clementi is a prolific Italian playwright who has written a number of plays that deconstruct common stereotypes about immigration and look critically at notions of both Italianess and otherness. Drawing on postcolonial theory and migration studies, this paper considers how Clementi's plays, "Ben Hur", "Finis Terrae" and "Clandestini" challenge the otherness with which immigrants are often charged in Italy's media and politics and focuses on the notion of mare nostrum as a hybrid site where individuals of different races and ethnicities negotiate their respective differences.
In order to challenge the homogenizing rhetoric of national identity, Clementi interweaves African legends, Judeo-Christian narratives, and various languages and dialects. The playwright successfully confounds the temporal frames of his plays so that the current migration in the Mediterranean becomes reminiscent of both the Atlantic Middle Passage of African slaves and the 19th and 20th-century Italian emigration. These dramaturgical strategies create meaningful frames of reference through which spectators can experience the limitations of geopolitics, engage with a postcolonial critique of Italian history, and reflect on the possibility of peaceful cohabitation.

Thursday, April 12

5:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research. For more information about the symposium, contact Dr. Brock Bahler (bab145@pitt.edu).

Thursday, April 12 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Friday, April 13

(All day) Symposium
European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Location:
527, 538, and 548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

9:45 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Keota Fields [UMass, Dartmouth], “Implicit Biases as Perceptual Skills: Is Anyone to Blame?”
Dr. Katherine Tullmann [Grand Valley State University], “Implicit Bias and Racialized Seeing: Development, Harm, and Moral Responsibility”

11:30 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Dan Flory [Montana State University], “Three Kinds of Racialized Disgust in Film”
Dr. Janine Jones [UNC Greensboro], “Perceiving Anti-Black Space: Where’s the Glitch?”

1:45 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Lacey Davidson [PhD candidate, Purdue University] & Dr. Daniel Kelly [Purdue], “Minding the Gap: Individual Biases, Soft Structures, and the Psychology of Social Norms”
Dr. Terrance MacMullan [Eastern Washington University], “The American Redoubt and the Coyolxauqui Imperative”

3:00 pm Lecture
The Unknown Patient: Medicine, Mystery & the City
Location:
3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology
See Details

What does it mean to solve a city through bodies? This paper draws from ongoing ethnographic research in a municipal public hospital trauma ward in Mumbai. The talk centers on a key figure in this context, the “Unknown” patient — this is the term for a patient who arrives to the ward without clear identity. Unknown patients underscore the challenge of trying to survive without kin. As mysteries of personhood get worked out alongside resuscitation, surgery, and intensive care, the ward's ethics and actions cut through different genres of sociality, including state bureaucracy, hospital emergency drama, detective mystery, and pulp crime. Problems of the city become problems for medicine and law to solve together. Knowing and feeling noir urbanism meshes with knowing and feeling bodily injury and repair. Ultimately, this raises broader questions about how to understand bodies and cities in tandem.

5:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.

Saturday, April 14

(All day) Symposium
2018 Islamic Studies Research Symposium
Location:
Duquesne University, 719 Fisher Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Consortium for Christian-Muslim Dialogue (CCMD) at Duquesne University
See Details

The public is invited to attend the 2018 Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) Symposium. The day will highlight the work of our faculty and students at our 30 member institutions. It will also serve as a celebration of the first fifteen years of CERIS’s accomplishments. This conference will take place on Saturday starting at 8:45 AM in 719 Fisher Hall with welcoming remarks. Studenst from 9 institutions will present their work from 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM, poetry reading by University of Pittsburgh student Emilio Rodriguez "Love, Worship, War, Life", our keynote address by Amir Hussian "Researching and Teaching about American Muslims" is at 11:00 AM, lunch at 12 Noon. Faculty from 8 institutions will present their research on simultaneous panels from 1 PM - 2:30 PM, and CERIS reflections will conclude the day. For complete program go to http://www.cerisnet.org/resource/2018-ceris-research-symposium.

9:30 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Hanan al-Khalaf [Kuwait University], “The Structure of Embodied Oppression: A Merleau-Pontyan Approach to Iris Young”
Dr. Erin Beeghly [University of Utah], “Embodiment & Oppression: Reflections on Haslanger”

11:15 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Department of Africana Studies, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Center for Philosophy of Science, Department of Philosophy, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Will Penman [ABD, CMU], “Rhetorical Debriefing as a Strategy for Rewriting Racial Logics”
Dr. Brock Bahler [University of Pittsburgh], “The Embodied Practices of Whiteness: Child Development, Extended Mind, and Habitus”

12:00 pm Festival
Latin American & Caribbean Festival
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall: Galleria, First Floor
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies: Latin American & Caribbean Festival

Latin American & Caribbean Festival (CLAS)
April 14, 2018
Noon-8 pm
Free and open to the public.

Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Galleria, First Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
University of Pittsburgh

http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/festival

1:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Center for Philosophy of Science, Department of Philosophy, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.

4:00 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Celine Leboeuf [Florida International University], “Reforming Racializing Bodily Habits: Mindfulness Meditation as an Intervention”
Dr. David Mills [Champlain College], “You Must Change Your Life: Sloterdijk, Religion, and Race”

8:00 pm Performance
University Gamelan 20th Anniversary Concert
Location:
Bellefield Hall Auditorium
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Department of Music
See Details

For 20 years, the University Gamelan has given audiences the opportunity to immerse themselves in the rich sounds of Indonesian Gamelan. Come celebrate with Pitt students, faculty, and special guest artists.

Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $8.50; non-Pitt students and seniors are $5. At the door: general admission is $12; non-Pitt students and seniors are $8. Pitt students: free with valid ID.

Monday, April 16

12:00 pm Lecture
Reasserting the center of the nation state: How supranational institutions reshape the public sector
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of Political Science
See Details

In this talk, I will analyze the impact of institutionalization at the supranational level on reforms that integrate and/or coordinate existing policy sectors at the domestic level. More specifically, I argue that the ongoing agencification of the European Union, where European agencies have been established with the aim of providing policy advice and fostering cooperation, has crucially strengthened these reforms. To examine this hypothesis, I present the results of multilevel analyses that estimate reform activity concerning policy integration and administrative coordination using an original dataset that compares four policy fields – environment, immigration, public health, and unemployment – in thirteen countries (eight EU members and five non-EU members) covering the period from 1985-2014. Overall, the results point to varying patterns of integration and coordination at the nation-state level and to the differential importance of agencification at supranational level.

4:00 pm Information Session
Digital Portfolio Information Session
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick will present ideas on how to effectively create and present yourself using the digital portfolio, a required component of the undergraduate certificate and BPHIL/IAS/Global Studies. Dr. McCormick has been meeting with many students and several of the same issues have arisen. He will address these issues as well as suggest other creative ideas.

Tuesday, April 17

12:00 pm Lecture
Predestined to Act for a Greater Cause: The Sense of Mission in Russia’s Foreign Policy
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

When stating their policies, states often talk about goals and tasks. Russia, apart from goals, also claims to have a “mission.” One often reads of a messianism deeply rooted in Russian tradition. Survey polls show that Russian society holds onto a popular belief that Russia, in order to develop and prosper, must strive for higher causes. Although Russian messianism is relatively well researched from the historical perspective, we are still lacking a substantial examination its contemporary form. The “messianic drive” is usually explained by the inner characteristics of the actor which claims to have mission. In the case of Russia, this characteristic is the impact of the Christian Orthodox tradition. Alicja Curanović, however, approaches messianism as a phenomenon triggered by external factors – dynamics within the international hierarchy of states. In her talk Dr. Curanović will present her findings about the mechanisms behind contemporary Russian messianism. She will talk about the content, context and functions of mission in Russia’s foreign policy after 1991 as well as changes and continuities in comparison to Russian messianism of XIX century.

Alicja Curanović is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Institute of International Relations at the University of Warsaw. Her main research interests are international relations in the post-Soviet area; Russian foreign policy; religious factor in international relations; perception, identity, image and status in politics. Her publications include the monograph The Religious Factor in Russia's Foreign Policy (Routledge, 2012) and numerous articles published in Politics and Religion, Nationalities Papers, and Religion, State and Society, among other journals. She has conducted research inter alia at the Columbia University, Stanford University, the Russian State University for Humanistic Studies and MGIMO and, currently, is a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.

12:30 pm Lecture
Latin American Dictatorship and Italian Neo-Fascism
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center
See Details

LATIN AMERICAN DICTATORSHIP AND ITALIAN NEO-FASCISM:
Transnational Anticommunist Networks in the Southern Cone, 1977-1981
By Vito Ruggerio

TUESDAY, APRIL 17TH
4217 POSVAR HALL
12:30 PM

Vito Ruggerio is a PhD student in Latin American History, University of Roma Tre. He was a research fellow at the National Security Archive within the Southern Cone Documentation Project, at George Washington University. In 2016, he was a history consultant for the Parliamentary Committee of Inquiry

12:30 pm Lecture
LATIN AMERICAN DICTATORSHIP ITALIAN NEO-FASCISM
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and European Studies Center
See Details

Vito Ruggerio is a PhD student in Latin American History, University of Roma Tre. He was a research fellow at the National Security Archive within the Southern Cone Documentation
Project, at George Washington University. In 2016, he was a history consultant for the Parliamentary Committee of Inquiry into the kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro.

2:00 pm Information Session
Digital Portfolio Information Session
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick will present ideas on how to effectively create and present yourself using the digital portfolio, a required component of the undergraduate certificate and BPHIL/IAS/Global Studies. Dr. McCormick has been meeting with many students and several of the same issues have arisen. He will address these issues as well as suggest other creative ideas.

4:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
1968: What Have We Learned
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

UCIS Center Directors will lead a discussion informed by the events in the series and their own research and reflections. Please join us and take part in this public conversation about the global legacies of 1968.

6:30 pm Film
Canal Stories (Panama)
Location:
G-23 Public Health Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

HISTORIAS DEL CANAL (Panama, 2014)
English subtitles
G-23 Public Health Building
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie
Free and open to the public!

Five shorts spanning a century on lives impacted by the Panama Canal.

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

Wednesday, April 18

12:00 pm Lecture
Legendary Women: Gio and Hotoke in Japanese Cultural History
Location:
119 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
See Details

Roberta Strippoli is an associate professor of Japanese literature at Binghamton University (SUNY) and author of Dancer, Nun, Ghost, Goddess. The Legend of Gio and Hotoke in Japanese Literature, Theater, Visual Arts, and Cultural Heritage (Brill, 2017).

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
UKRAINIAN LEADERS EXAMINE ISSUES OF INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

Open World Leadership Center, a legislative branch agency, will send a delegation of Crimean Tatars from Ukraine to Pittsburgh from April 13 - 21 2018. While in Pittsburgh, Open World delegates will be hosted by GlobalPittsburgh.
The 5 delegates comprising the delegation includes Mr. Khalil Khalilov, Head of the Crimeam Tatar Cultural Center “Crimean House in L’viv; Ms. Maryna Liakh, Head of “Smile of a Child” Charitable Foundation; Ms. Mariia Huliaieva , Coordinator of the Severodonetsk Office , Charitable Organization “Vostok-SOS;” Ms. Anastasiia Martynovska, Lawyer at Strategic Litigation Center, Ukrainian Helsinki Human Rights Union; and Ms. Elnara Abdullaieva, Postgraduate student at the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine. The group is accompanied by Mr. Viacheslav Zub, a bicultural facilitator, and Ms. Olga Shostachuk, a bilingual translator.

Prior to their arrival in Pittsburgh, the delegates will have completed an orientation in Washington, D.C. on Capitol Hill. A meeting has been requested for the group with the office of Representative Mike Doyle, Pennsylvania District 14. In Pittsburgh, delegates will collaborate on best practices for programs and services for immigrants and refugees. They will meet with representatives of the Offices of Mayor Bill Peduto and County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. Additionally, they will have appointments with key organizations working in the region with immigrants and refugees including: Jewish Family and Community Services; Catholic Charities Free Health Care Center; the Community Assistance and Refugee Resettlement, Northern Area Multi-Service Center; and the Women’s Center & Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh, among others. The group will participate in a roundtable discussion facilitated by the University Center for International Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. The delegation will stay in the homes of local residents, serving as hospitality hosts.

Thursday, April 19

4:00 pm Lecture
Political Integration as a Strategy of Conflict Resolution: The FARC in Colombian Elections
Location:
CLAS Reception Area--4200 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas (CLAS)
See Details

The CLAS Round Table Discussions are monthly Panoramas-sponsored events meant to facilitate meaningful dialogues on current issues in Latin America.

PIZZA WILL BE PROVIDED!!

5:30 pm Lecture
Capitalism, Poverty, & Praxis
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Cultural Studies Program
See Details

Professor Patnaik is a world-renowned Marxist economist, critic of neoliberalism, and political commentator. He is the author of Excursus in History: Essays on Some Ideas of Irfan Habib (Tulika Books 2011), Re-Envisioning Socialism (Tulika Books 2011), The Value of Money (Columbia UP 2009), The Retreat to Unfreedom: Essays on the Emerging World Order (Tulika 2003), Accumulation and Stability Under Capitalism (Clarendon Press, 1997), and Macroeconomics (Oxford UP 1995), Economics and Egalitarianism (Oxford UP 1991), Lenin and Imperialism: An Appraisal of Theories and Contemporary Reality (Sangam Books 1986), and co-author of several volumes, including A Theory of Imperialism (Columbia UP 2017). As executive head of the state of Kerala’s planning board from 2006 to 2011, he over saw a significant expansion in welfare measures. In 2008, he joined three other prominent economists on Interactive Panel of the United Nations General Assembly on the Global Financial Crisis.

Thursday, April 19 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Friday, April 20 until Saturday, April 21

9:00 am Workshop
Moot ICC
Location:
Pitt Law School
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education
See Details

This competition introduces high school students to international law. Students read a case written by law students, write memorials, and argue before judges.

Friday, April 20

11:30 am Colloquium/Lecture Series / Brown Bag
European Colloquium Session
Location:
4209 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of German, Department of Anthropology, Department of History and Carnegie-Mellon University Department of History

Friday, April 20 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Saturday, April 21

8:30 am Workshop/Teacher Training--Area Studies/Teacher Training--Language
French Immersion Institute Workshop
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

Samedi 3 mars 2018:
La situation linguistique et culturelle en Bretagne, Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon

Samedi 21 avril 2018:
Françoise Giroud & Simone Veil: deux écrivaines politiques pour la couse des femmes
Conférencière: Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh

Program runs from 9:00-13:30, with an 8:30 breakfast and 12:30 lunch included.

Registration deadlines: February 26th for March 3rd workshop; April 16th for April 21st workshop.
Enclose a $20.00 check for each program ($40.00 for both). Fee includes ACT 48 credit-4 -hours for each program, breakfast and lunch.) Send check payable to the University of Pittsburgh. To facilitate our records, please write on check memo: (French Immersion)

Bonnie Adair-Hauck: adairhauck@gmail.com

Saturday, April 21 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Monday, April 23

6:30 pm Lecture
Author Visit - EU Prize for Literature: 2018 CES Book Choice
Location:
Carnegie Library of Oakland, South Wing Reading Room
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Tuesday, April 24

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag/Panel Discussion
EuroForum: City Networks and the Pittsburgh Glasgow Project
Location:
Virtual Briefing
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with International Business Center and German American Chambers of Commerce
See Details

For more information and to register for this FREE virtual briefing: http://virtualbriefing.eventbrite.com/?s=83955634

Faced with a number of complex challenges on a global scale, Pittsburgh city officials have cultivated networks of cities around the world to exchange best practices and experiences in the pursuit of policy-making that works. What opportunities do such networks open up for local businesses and industry? What are cities like Pittsburgh and Glasgow learning from each other?
Join us for a Virtual Briefing about the Pittsburgh-Glasgow Project that is promoting just cities across the Atlantic. Log in from your home or office, or join us in person at downtown or Oakland.

PRESENTERS:
Grant Ervin
Chief Resilience Officer, City of Pittsburgh
Des McNulty
Vice-Chair, Glasgow Commission on Economic Growth
Lee Haller
Director, Department of Innovation & Performance, City of Pittsburgh

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
Housing as a Human Right: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Location:
107 David Lawrence Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with University of Pittsburgh's Urban Studies Program, Pitt Human Rights Initiative, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, City of Pittsburgh Commission on Human Relations and Human Rights City Alliance
See Details

In 2011, Pittsburgh’s City Council named our city a “Human Rights City.” This designation signals the city’s commitment to human rights and its intention to “[work] to provide leadership and advocacy to secure, protect, and promote human rights for all people.” This panel offers perspectives about how this commitment to human rights could be realized in the area of housing. Panelists with backgrounds in national and international human rights law and advocacy will discuss lessons being developed in communities around the country about how to better implement internationally recognized human rights in local policies. In addition, participants will learn how international treaties and the United Nations relate to housing practices in cities like Pittsburgh and about work happening in Pittsburgh to promote innovative approaches to the affordable housing crisis.

Panelists include: Gerald S. Dickinson, Esq., Assistant Professor of Law, University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Jackie Smith, Professor of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh; Coordinator, Pittsburgh Human Rights City Alliance, and Steering Committee chair, National Human Rights Cities Alliance; Carl Redwood, Hill District Consensus Group

Friday, April 27

3:00 pm Reception
UCIS Graduation Celebration
Location:
Ballroom, O'Hara Student Center
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Students from all UCIS centers graduating in Spring and Summer 2018 are invited with their families to join this UCIS wide ceremony celebrating their completion of the certificate or BPHIL/IAS.

Saturday, April 28

3:30 pm Film
Screening: Itzhak
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of
See Details

Pittsburgh Premiere
From Mozart to Billy Joel, Itzhak Perlman’s violin playing transcends mere performance to evoke the celebrations and struggles of real life. This poignant documentary looks beyond the sublime musician to see the polio survivor whose parents emigrated from Poland to Israel, and the young man who struggled to be taken seriously as a music student when schools saw only his disability. As charming and entrancing as the famous violinist himself, Itzhak is a portrait of musical virtuosity seamlessly enclosed in warmth, humor, and above all, love.

Audience Award-Best Documentary – Miami Jewish Film Festival
Best of Fest – Palm Springs International Film Festival

“A love story on many levels — Perlman’s love of music, of the violin, of life itself…” –Ray Rogers, Hollywood Reporter

To view the trailer and buy tickets, visit http://filmpittsburgh.org/film/itzhak/

Sunday, April 29

4:00 pm Film
Screening: A Bag of Marbles
Location:
SouthSide Works Cinema
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pittsburgh Filmmakers
See Details

Pittsburgh Premiere
Two young Jewish brothers, forced to escape Nazi-occupied Paris, must separate from their family and find their way to safety, relying only on their courage and cunning, a bit of luck, and the occasional kindness of strangers. A suspenseful family-friendly adaptation of the acclaimed memoir of Joseph Joffo, A Bag of Marbles is filled with stunning scenery, remarkable characters, and a captivating story that audiences will find hard to forget. (Adult content: language, violence)

Audience Award-Best Narrative – Boston, Miami, and San Diego Jewish Film Festivals

“…one of the best movies told about the Holocaust from a child’s point of view in a long time.” –Hannah Brown, Jerusalem Post

To view the trailer and buy tickets, visit http://filmpittsburgh.org/film/a-bag-of-marbles/.

Monday, April 30 until Saturday, May 5

10:00 am Film
Russian Film Symposium
Location:
Daytime panels/screenings will be in Cathedral of Learning 332; Evening screenings at the Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
See Details

SCHEDULE
Daytime panels/screenings will be in Cathedral of Learning 332
Evening screenings at the Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room

Monday 30 April
10 am: Aleksei Rybin: All Will Soon End (2016) 112 min
Response: Florence Helbing
2 pm: Iusup Razykov: Turkish Gambit (2017) 76 min
Introduction: Ol’ga Shervud
Response: Nikhil Thomas Titus

Tuesday 1 May
10 am: Lera Surkova: Pagans (2017) 92 min
Introduction: Elise Thorsen
Response: Olga Kim
2 pm: Sergei Mokritskii: Battle for Sevastopol (2015) 110 min
Introduction: Alena Solnsteva
Response: Tetyana Shlikhar

Wednesday 2 May
10 am: Andrei Kravchuk: Viking (2016) 133 min
Introduction: David Pettersen
Response: Chip Crane
2:30 pm: Roundtable 1
Nancy Condee and Alena Solnsteva
7:30 pm: Andrei Zviagintsev: Loveless (2017) 128 min
Introduction: Alena Solnsteva

Thursday 3 May
10 am: Iuliia Kolesnik: Lower Caledonia (2006) 97 min
Introduction: Anne Garrels
Response: Ellina Sattarova
7:30 pm: Pavel Chukhrai: Cold Tango (2017) 107 min
Introduction:

Friday 4 May
10 am: Kseniia Zueva: Nearest and Dearest (2017) 95 min
Introduction: Oxana Sarkisova
Response: Zhanna Budenkova
2 pm: Nikolai Lebedev: Air Crew (2016) 107 min
Introduction: John Lyon
Response: Kiun Hwang
7:30 pm: Kantemir Balagov: Closeness (2017) 118 min
Introduction: Oxana Sarkisova

Saturday 5 May
11 am: Roundtable 2
Vladimir Padunov and Ol’ga Shervud
7:30 pm: Aleksei Uchitel’: Matilda (2017) 109 min
Introduction: Ol’ga Shervud

Monday, April 30

7:30 pm Film
Screening: In a Dark Wood
Location:
SouthSide Works Cinema
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of Pittsburgh Filmmakers
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World Premiere
In a Dark Wood charts the path of composer Mathew Rosenblum’s “Lament/Witches’ Sabbath,” a highly personal concerto written for world famous clarinetist/composer David Krakauer. Filmed in Pittsburgh, New York City, and Boston, the film reminisces on the friendship of Rosenblum and Krakauer while exploring Rosenblum’s remembrance of his grandmother, who fled Proskurov, Ukraine in 1919, ahead of a massacre. This moving documentary tells a story of the endurance of family, the winding path of friendship, and the craft of composing music.

Followed by a Q&A with director David Bernabo and composer Mathew Rosenblum.

To watch the trailer and buy tickets, visit http://filmpittsburgh.org/film/in-a-dark-wood/.