Events in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Sunday, October 28

(All day) Conference
19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh Press, Confucious Institute, World History Center, Year of PittGlobal, China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

CESS 2018 : October 24-28, 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh

The Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Graduate School for Public and International Affairs are pleased to host the 19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. Join over 300 scholars and professionals from around the globe for a conference, spanning five days of workshops, panels, forums, exhibits, and special events.

For more information about the program, see https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program.

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, October 26

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Bolsonaro and the Future of Brazilian Democracy
Location:
4801 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Political Science
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Political Science present

Bolsonaro and the Future of Brazilian Democracy
Featuring invited panelists: Barry Ames and Joao Guedes Neto

Friday, October 26th
12 p.m.
4801 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

For more information: dms180@pitt.edu

Pizza provided! Free and open to the public!

3:00 pm Lecture
Mediating Voice, Sounding Politics: Āwāj as Metaphor and Material
Location:
3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Kunreuther will discuss the South Asian term ‘āwāj’ as a vernacular alternative to global discourses of ‘voice’. While global discourses of voice (in English) rarely turn our attention to the soundings of democracy, the term ‘āwāj’, used in many South Asian languages, refers explicitly to sound and to metaphoric meanings of voice. At a metaphorical level largely developed through media, ‘āwāj’ resonates with modern, global discourses of voice used to describe interior thoughts and desires, political consciousness, agency, and modes of selfhood central to modern publics and democratic practice. Because sound affects us in ways that often exceed words, ‘āwāj’ helps us focus our attention on the connections between the rational and the affective, the articulate and the inarticulate, rather than their fundamental division, raising questions around how we think about democratic practice.

4:30 pm Lecture
The Power of Evidence-Based Research in Policy-Making: Lessons from Afghanistan
Location:
David Lawrence Hall 121
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), School of Education, World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

Conference registration required (https://www.cess.pitt.edu/registration).

Dr. Orzala Nemat is an internationally known Afghan scholar and a life time activist recognized for being an expert in political ethnography. Her research focuses on the political economy of governance interventions in conflict affected settings highlighting local governance relations in Afghanistan’s villages resulting from the policies of transnational/international institutions and central government’s development and political interventions.

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
CERIS Meeting & Book Discussion
Location:
Seton Hill University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
6:30 pm Performance
Chhandayan Concert
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Vocal: Manasi Majumder
Sarod: Tejendra N. Majumder
Tabla: Samir Chatterjee
Harmonium: Neelesh Nadkarni
This concert is co-sponsored by Music Department and Asian Studies Center

For more Tickets & info: 412-580-1023/ 908-892-9215/ 646-281-4062 / info@tabla.org
Ticket online: https://tabla.org/calendar/ 2018/10/26

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Palenque!
Location:
Kelly Strayhorn Theater
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Dance at Slippery Rock University, Frederick Douglass Institute at Slippery Rock University and Latin American Cultural Union
See Details

Bésame is partnering with Melissa Teodoro, professor of dance at Slippery Rock University. This is an original production featuring the music, dance, poetry, and culture of the Colombian Atlantic Coast. This is an original production featuring the music, dance, poetry, and culture of the Colombian Atlantic Coast.

October 26 at Kelly Strayhorn Theater
7 - 9 PM
5941 Penn Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206

https://www.facebook.com/events/296907681087739/

$15 General admission
$10 Students -- cash at the door

7:00 pm Reception
CESS Welcome Reception
Location:
Posvar Hall Galleria
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press, School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

Featuring music by Dutar Odeyev

MUST BE REGISTERED FOR THE CESS CONFERENCE TO ATTEND (https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program).