Events in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Thursday, November 1

12:00 pm Film
Children 404, dir. Pavel Loparev and Askold Kurov
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Children’s Literature and Cultural Studies Program
See Details

In response to Russian leader Vladimir Putin’s 2013 outlawing of “gay propaganda,” activist Elena Klimova created Children 404, an online forum for Russian-speaking LGBTQ teens.

4:30 pm Lecture
The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State
Location:
5201 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

John Torpey will be discussing the new edition of his book The Invention of the Passport. Dr. Torpey is Professor
of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, CUNY.

5:00 pm Lecture
Historical Memory in Spain and Other Iberianist Challenges
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

Sebastiaan Faber presents a lecture centered on the continuing public debates in Spain over the legacy of the Civil War and Francoism, which have posed a series of challenges related to questions of disciplinarity, audience, and commitment.

5:30 pm Lecture
South Asia Speaker Series - Congress of Kings: Notes on a Painting Showing a Mughal Ruler Having Sex
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

As part of our Year 3 Speaker Series of our South Asia Initiative, Dr. Kavita Singh, Professor of Art History and Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics Jawaharlal Nehru University will be speaking on the Congress of Kings: Notes on a Painting Showing a Mughal Ruler Having Sex.

Muhammad Shah Rangila, lord of a dwindling Mughal empire from 1719-1748, is remembered for his political incompetence as well as his great appetite for pleasure. Bolstering this reputation is a famous painting that shows him in sexual congress with an as yet unidentified woman. Although it appears at first as the record of an intimate moment, scholars have noted the stately symmetry of the image, the presence of witnesses, the retention of symbols of power such as the halo, huqqa and sword. All of these imply that this was a ceremonial portrait, more public than private in its intention. If this is so, by whom was this portrait meant to be seen, and what was it meant to show? How does this image intersect with earlier traditions of Mughal portraiture, and with earlier, public signs of the emperors' affections? Is this frank depiction of the Mughal emperor at all related to the pervasive interest in love and sexual love seen in Indic literary and visual arts? This lecture speculates on the possible meanings of this painting by placing it in the context of the emperor’s own biography as well as traditions of portraiture, music, poetry and medical and erotological literature circulating in Muhammad Shah’s time.

Bio of Speaker:
Kavita Singh is Professor of Art History and is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she teaches courses on the history of Indian painting and the history and politics of museums. She has published essays on issues of colonial history, repatriation, secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialisation of difficult histories as they relate to museums in India and beyond. She has also published essays on aspects of Mughal painting.

6:00 pm Film
Power to Change
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, G8
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany;
See Details

Carl-A. Fechner's 2016 documentary uses Germany as a case study to offer a forward thinking vision of a sustainable, democratic, green future.

6:30 pm Cultural Event
Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
Location:
Carnegie Music Hall & Hall of Sculpture
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Carnegie Museum of Art
See Details

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
Thursday, November 1, 6:30-10:00 pm, Meet at GSC at 6:15 pm and walk over to the Carnegie.
To reserve a spot: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd-6Q5VK30x_iTLkOgDNgKLZPJdxUrh...
Come for the lecture and stay as long as your schedule permits.

Join GSC for artist presentation, performance and more.
Artists Cristóbal Martínez and Kade Twist of Postcommodity will lead the evening with a discussion about their diverse practice. Their art has bridged the US-Mexico border, and projected sound into Aristotle's Lyceum. Through an indigenous lens, the collective's distinctive practice brings history and social discourse to bear on complex issues. The work of art that they have created for the Carnegie International embodies Pittsburgh's industrial history in steel, glass, and coal. Hear Martínez and Twist speak about the complexities of creating visual language and narrative around issues that challenge us today.

Meet at GSC at 6:15 p.m., 4101 Posvar Hall
Artist Talk: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Music Hall
Performance: 8-8:30 p.m., Hall of Sculpture
Activities and galleries open until 10 p.m.

Friday, November 2

11:00 am Panel Discussion
Erwin Panofsky in Translation
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture, Department of Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Department of Jewish Studies and Humanities Center
See Details

Speakers: Sonja Drimmer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Josh Ellenbogen (University of Pittsburgh), Jacqueline Jung (Yale University), and Karl Whittington (The Ohio State University). Organizer: Shirin Fozi (University of Pittsburgh).

Fifty years after his passing, Erwin Panofsky (1892-1968) remains one of the most widely read art historians of the past century, and perhaps the single most influential figure in establishing (in his own phrase) "the history of art as a humanistic discipline." He also belongs to a generation of German Jewish scholars who began their careers in their native country but were displaced by World War II, and eventually came to North America where they had a profound impact on Anglophone scholarship. In Panofsky's case this has led to an odd but powerful historiographic divide: his early work, published in German, is still widely read in Europe but scarcely known in the United States -- especially compared to his later, widely renowned English-language publications.

This colloquium seeks to address that gap by bringing together a small, focused group of scholars to address Panofsky's early work in a set of new, unpublished translations. Participants will read pre-circulated English versions of three texts: "The Problem of Style" (1915), German Sculpture of the Eleventh through Thirteenth Centuries (1924), and "Imago Pietatis" (1927). The colloquium will be an opportunity to discuss the essays, consider their position in the humanities today, and also reflect on the process of translation as a means of increasing access to a pivotal era of transatlantic scholarly exchange.

Interested participants must RSVP to Karoline Swiontek (karoline@pitt.edu) no later than Friday, October 26. Participation is open to all, but space is limited and RSVPs are required in order to receive access to the pre-circulated texts. Coffee and a light lunch will be served.

2:00 pm Lecture
Year of Pitt Global Featured Speaker: Jon McCourt, civil rights and community activist
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, G24
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Year of Pitt Global and Department of History
See Details

Jon McCourt has been a community peace activist and member of the Peace and Reconciliation Group in Derry, Northern Ireland, for more than 30 years. He played a major role in the development of the Community Awareness Training Programme and founded and established the first Victim Support Service in Northern Ireland in 1986. He has also worked with those involved in conflicts around the world, including Bosnia, the Middle East, Rwanda, and Colombia.

Join the Year of Pitt Global, the European Studies Center, and the Department of History for this Signature Event as we hear from Jon on his experience with conflict and peacemaking around the world.

Jon will answer questions following his talk!

Friday, November 2 until Sunday, November 4

5:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Global Health Mini Course
Location:
2400 Sennott Square
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Health: Health and Well Being:PS 1903/29734
This course will examine food insecurity and malnutrition as a part of a larger discussion on how to ensure healthy lives and well-being for all ages. Sustainable Development goals 2 and 3 will be the primary focus of the course.The course is for 1 credit and will run Friday November 2- Sunday November 4 2018

Friday, November 2 until Saturday, November 3

5:30 pm Symposium
2018 Graduate Symposium
Location:
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater / Humanities Center room 602, the Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture
See Details

Motivating Monuments:
Defining Collective Identities in Public Spaces

A symposium hosted by the graduate students of the history of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Pittsburgh will be held November 2-3, 2018. Dr. Jacqueline Jung will serve as the symposium's keynote speaker.

The goal of this conference is to promote interdisciplinary discussions about the power invested in monuments and how individual attachments to them are persistently and profoundly mediated by shared group identities. This symposium takes objects as concrete manifestation of collective identities and will foster productive, in-depth discussions about the shared stakes of monuments. Conversations will unfold across premodern, early modern, modern, and contemporary topics, thematically linking research that might otherwise be isolated by disciplinary or historical divides.

Saturday, November 3

7:00 pm Festival
2018 Korean Music Festival
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Nationality Rooms along with Intercultural Exchange Programs
See Details

Reception to Follow

Sunday, November 4

1:00 pm Cultural Event
Slovak Heritage Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies on behalf of Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Pitt Student Slovak Club and Slovak Studies Program
See Details

The University of Pittsburgh's Pitt Student Slovak Club and Slovak Studies Program present the 28th annual Slovak Heritage Festival. This popular event features continuous musical performers, cultural displays and lectures, Slovak and other East European import vendors, and ethnic food (klobasa, halušky, holupki, pirohy, and pastries).

Monday, November 5

1:00 pm Lecture
Somebody Is Watching
Location:
Humanities Center Conference Room, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

"Koshikijima no Toshidon" is a New Year's Eve ritual performed annually on the island of Shimo-Koshikijima off the southwest coast of Kagoshima Prefecture. During the event, men masked and costumed as frightening demon-deities enter individual households to "discipline" and "educate" young children. In 2009 the ritual was inscribed on UNESCO's Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. This talk will introduce Toshidon with a focus on the way a structure of surveillance, of "seeing and being seen," informs the performance of the ritual and to a certain extent the everyday lives of the islanders. An understanding of the dynamic of this "optic imaginary" provides insight into broader questions of community, tourism, UNESCO, and the production of heritage in Japan and elsewhere.

4:30 pm Lecture
Global Migration: The Case of the Volhynian Germans
Location:
History Department Lounge 3703 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History
See Details

This talk centers on migration schemes of a German-speaking group that used to live in Ukraine. After the 1880s, the worsening economic and political situation in the Russian Empire forced many of these people to move to other regions in the world, such as Siberia, Canada, Brazil or Germany. Eventually, Hitler's population policies put an end to German-speaking settlements in Ukraine, with the descendants scattered all over the world but still connected today.

4:30 pm Lecture
Global Migration: The Case of the Volhynian Germans
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall (History Department Lounge)
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of
5:00 pm Career Counselling
Careers in International Trade & Development: Asian Development Bank
Location:
115 Mervis Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and International Business Center
See Details

Bart W. Édes, the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) Representative in North America since October 2017, is coming to the University of Pittsburgh to discuss careers, fellowships and more exciting opportunities with the Asian Development Bank. In his current role, Bart mobilizes financing for ADB’s developing member countries; shares development knowledge and experience; establishes and deepens partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raises public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.

Tuesday, November 6

12:00 pm Lecture
How To Read A Kimono: Reconsidering The Makioka Sisters
Location:
Humanities Center Conference Room, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Kimonos in literature and film are often ignored by scholars as nothing more than aesthetic objects/clothing that enhance historical realism. But in fact, kimonos speak of many things, including the character of the wearer, social commentary, and important symbolic meanings for the plot.
This talk uses kimonos to examine Tanizaki Jun'ichirō's Sasameyuki (The Makioka Sisters, 1943-48)a move depicting a wealthy merchant family in Osaka. Based loosely on the lives of the author's wife and her siblings, the work was considered frivolous and censored during the war; it was only completed and published in the postwar period. Examining kimonos discussed in the text, Professor Suzuki illuminates their complex meanings in light of changing laws, sartorial culture and social contexts. She will also discuss visual presentations of kimonos in two film versions of the Makioka Sisters, one produced in 1950 during the U.S. Occupation and the other in 1983 at the height of Japan's economic prosperity.

6:30 pm Film
CLAS Cinema Series: Spider Thieves
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Spanish Film Club
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies presents the CLAS Cinema Series Fall 2018:
September 11 ... The Future Perfect
October 2 ... On the Roof
October 23 ... Eyes of the Journey
November 6 ... Spider Thieves
November 27 ... The Candidate
December 4 ... The Queen of Spain

Tuesdays at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
6:30 P.M. - Pizza
7:00 P.M. - Movie

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/
Free & Open to the Public!
English subtitles provided.

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies at Pitt, CLAS CINEMA Series, and Spanish Film Club by Pragda

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/

Wednesday, November 7

12:00 pm Cultural Event
Boxes & Walls
Location:
William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Robin Hood's Criminal Groups
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas (CLAS)
See Details

Join Panoramas in a discussion on "Robin Hood's Criminal Groups: Providing for the Community When the Government Cannot."

Wednesday, November 7th
4217 Posvar Hall
4:30 p.m.

Panoramas provides a web-based venue for thoughtful dialogue of Latin American and Caribbean issues. By enabling a voice for scholars, students, policy makers and others to engage in constructive commentary on relevant current and historical topics, the forum also serves as an academic resource to worldwide educational audiences. Housed at the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, and maintained by CLAS faculty, students and alumni, Panoramas strives to be at the forefront of scholarly analysis of affairs in the Latin American region.

For more information and to join the conversation, visit:
https://www.panoramas.pitt.edu/

For other events sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list

6:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Digital Portfolio Information Sessions
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

The portfolio is an integrated element of the certificate experience. Students should begin their portfolio soon after enrollment in the GSC program. GSC in collaboration with other UCIS centers will hold three workshop sessions to help with aligning expectations and offering specific tips on how to traverse Wordpress to create a tailored portfolio. Mark your calendar for the following dates:
9/17/18, 6 pm, 4130 WWPH
10/9/18, 6 pm, 4217 WWPH
11/7/18, 6 pm, 4217 WWPH

6:00 pm Cultural Event
Asia Pop Karaoke Night
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Thursday, November 8

10:00 am Symposium
IISE 2018 Symposium Series
Location:
4318 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with School of Social Work
See Details

In the upcoming Institute for International Studies in Education (IISE) Symposium Series, Professor Werner Schönig will discuss his latest research, “Considerations on Typologies and Classifications With a Focus on Social Work and Social Policy.” Schönig is currently a visiting scholar at the Institute for International Studies in Education and is a professor at Catholic University of Applied Sciences in Germany. This event is co-sponsored by the School of Social Work, University Center for International Studies, European Studies and Global Studies.
A light lunch will be served.

12:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Dr. Oni is a visiting professor at Robert Morris University this fall. He specializes in Sociology of Education. His area of research focus includes; social problems in education, Social change in education, social deviances/social disorganizations in education with particular focus on students’ secret cult in Nigeria. This presentation discusses how the Issue of security has threatened the continued relevance of the scheme and challenges confronting it. Why is the unity of Nigeria being persistently threatened? Why has our diversity as a people becoming a challenge to national unity? What can Nigeria learn from the age-long diversity of America as a way of sustaining her fragile diversity? These and many more will be captured by this presentation.

Friday, November 9 until Saturday, November 10

(All day) Symposium
Comparative European Governance: A Symposium in Honor of Alberta Sbragia
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

Various locations, see full program at: ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/sbragia-symposium.

Friday, November 9

12:30 pm Lecture
Democracy for Social Emancipation: Lessons from Around the World
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law School
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Studies Center along with Department of Sociology and Pitt Human Rights Working Group
See Details

What does it mean for the people to actually rule? Gianpaolo Baiocchi discusses his new book, We, the Sovereign: Radical Futures, which draws from his work with social movements from Latin America, Southern Europe, and other parts of the world to examine how popular struggles are creating new forms of democratic participation aimed at making political parties and state institutions instruments of social emancipations.

3:00 pm Panel Discussion
Discussion of the Tree of Life Massacre
Location:
5401 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Jewish Studies Program and Department of German
See Details

Rabbi Walter Jacob is Rabbi Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Rodef Shalom;
Eric Lidji is the Director of the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History
Center; Dr. Kathleen Blee is Bailey Dean of the Dietrich School of Arts and
Sciences and the College of General Studies, and Professor of Sociology and
History; Dr. Irina Livezeanu is Associate Professor of History and Director of the
Jewish Studies Program.
This event is a courtesy listing.

Saturday, November 10

(All day) Lecture
Housing Summit
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
(All day) Cultural Event
Decorating Day
Location:
Cathedral of Learning/Nationality Rooms
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Decorating Day is when the Nationality Room Committees come together to decorate their rooms for the Holidays. There will be a reception in the Commons Room for the decorators.

9:00 am Cultural Event
Holiday Decorating Day
Location:
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

Nationality Rooms decorate their rooms in holiday fare.

7:30 pm Student Club Activity
African Gala
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with African Students Organization (ASO)
See Details

The African Gala aims to celebrate Africa’s great achievements and its people as well as the African diaspora. The event aims to bring together students, faculty, and community members in an environment where they can learn more about the great traditions, cultures, history. It is a great opportunity for people to network and learn more about each other. This is a black tie/traditional wear event. Come prepared to celebrate and enjoy yourselves through music, performances and food!

Sunday, November 11

12:00 pm Cultural Event
Polishfest 2018
Location:
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Nationality Rooms on behalf of
See Details

Live demonstrations of Polish cooking, pierogi making, Polish Pastries, hand painted Polish Easter eggs, straw ornaments, Polish surname origins, Polish paper cuttings, St. Andrew’s Eve fortune telling and a variety of Polish, Lithuanian and Carpatho-Rusyn folk arts will be featured for festival guests to try. Join Radek Fizik and his Polish Folk Songs and the Polkas, Obereks and Mazurkas of “Frania’s Polka Celebration" for your listening and dancing pleasure. The Polish Kitchen and Old World Bakery will offer delicious foods and baked goods at reasonable prices. The “Lajkoniki” Polish Folk Dance Ensemble, “Bociai” Lithuanian Choir, Polish Falcons of America - Poland’s 100 Years of Freedom, “Karuzela” Polish Folk Choir and “Juraj Adamik - Tatra/Carpathian Mountaineer Ax Dancing" will offer continuous live entertainment through the day. Proceeds to benefit the University of Pittsburgh Nationality Room Scholarship Fund.

Tuesday, November 13

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe: Peace in Europe: 100 Year Anniversary of Armistice Day
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Protests in Nicaragua: A Voice of Resistance
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas (CLAS)
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies and Panoramas present
Protests in Nicaragua: A Voice of Resistance

Tuesday, November 13th
12 - 2 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Moderators:
John Soluri (Associate Professor, Director of Global Studies at Carnegie Mellon University)
Michel Gobat - Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh

Panelists:
Douglas Castro
Professor & Researcher, Universidad Centroamericana
Member of Alianza Cívica's Political Committee

Lesther Alemán
Student of Communications, Universidad Centroamericana
Member of Alianza Cívica's Political Committee

Jeancarlo López
Student of Engineering, National Autonomous University of Nicaragua
Member of Alianza Cívica's Political Committee

For more information: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list

2:30 pm Career Counselling
Careers in Cybersecurity: National Cyber-Forensic & Training Alliance (NCFTA)
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Sean Wolfgang, senior cybersecurity intelligence analyst at the National Cyber-Forensic and Training Alliance (NCFTA), is coming to the University of Pittsburgh to discuss transatlantic issues of cybersecurity and cooperation. Additionally, Sean will provide relevant details on careers in cybersecurity and how the field of study is evolving.

Wednesday, November 14

12:00 pm Lecture
An Education in Diaspora: African Students in the USSR and the Queer Contours of Socialist Friendship in Sissako's "October" and "Rostov-Luanda
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with World History Center, Children’s Literature and Cultural Studies Program
See Details

In “Oktyabr (October)” (1993) and “Rostov-Luanda” (1998), the Mauritanian film director Abderrahmane Sissako shines a light on the experiences of African students in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Sissako, like many young Africans at the time, studied in the Soviet Union in the 1980s on a “Socialist Friendship” scholarship, making these two very different films, one a work of fiction, the other a pseudo-documentary, divergent experiments in documenting the displaced self. Working within the frameworks of diasporic intimacy and queer diaspora, this talk explores “Oktyabr” and “Rostov-Luanda” as meditations on the uniquely constructed intinerancy of black communities in the Soviet Union, a distinctly "queer" transience all the more intensified by the peripatetic nature of student life.

5:30 pm Panel Discussion
Pittsburgh Good Neighbors
Location:
Pitt Campus, O'Hara StudentCenter, Ballroom (2nd Floor)
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of
See Details

Interested in learning more about taking entrepreneurial action to help solve local, regional, national or global challenges? Students, alumni, and the Pittsburgh community are welcome to join us for a conversation with Pittsburgh impact investors a conversation with four Pittsburgh impact investors who will talk about the various forms and motivations for investing in mission-driven organizations…all of whom have helped Thread International’s journey from inspiration to impact

7:00 pm Film
The Student screening
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies on behalf of GOSECA
See Details

A high school student becomes convinced that the world is lost to evil and begins to challenge the morals and beliefs of the adults surrounding him.

Thursday, November 15

12:45 pm Panel Discussion
Let's Talk Africa
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is hosting a student roundtable for those who would like to learn more about their Robert Frederick Smith Internship Program. The summer program provides well-paid full-time internships for 12 weeks with projects in DC, Pittsburgh, and other locations around the country. This information session on the Robert F. Smith program will include application instructions, internship benefits, and tips on making your application competitive.

The program seeks to build a professional pipeline for historically underrepresented individuals to grow successful careers in the cultural sector. All internship opportunities with this program will focus on work related to digital imaging, media preservation, digital preservation of personal and community objects, digital content management, collections information management, recording and preserving oral histories, or digital film-making.

4:00 pm Lecture
"Let's Become Less": Networks and Nationalisms in the Feminist Challenge to 'Mass Sterilization' in Mexico and Brazil
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Dean Twyning and Year of PittGlobal
See Details

"Let's Become Less": Networks and Nationalisms in the Feminist Challenge to 'Mass Sterilization' in Mexico and Brazil

Thursday, November 15th
602 Cathedral of Learning
4:00 p.m.

This presentation explores the history of feminist and other societal mobilization around population policy, particularly "mass sterilization," in Mexico and Brazil. Against the transnational backdrop of Cold War geopolitics, it traces the role of social movements, national governments, and transnational networks in these histories.

This event is free and open to the public!

For more information, visit: gsws.pitt.edu

4:30 pm Lecture
Global Issues Through Literature
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

The fall 2018 Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn about and use new texts in the classroom, will explore ways in which authors' works touch upon issues of exile, religious intolerance, and injustices to marginalized groups such as women and the LGBTQ community. Books, Act 48 credit, dinner, and parking are provided!

6:00 pm Performance
The Goddess Performance
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Friday, November 16

2:30 pm Lecture
How Green Is It?
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, 363
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany;
See Details

Dr. Simon Richter, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature at the University of Pennsylvania will present the cultural story of Germany's energy transition (Energiewende) and help us think through whether it can be considered a failure or a success or somehow both.

7:30 pm Performance
The Traditional Folk Music Instruments of Crete: 2500 Years of History and Inspiration
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms
See Details

A dialogue of music and history by the renowned Cretan musicians Vaggelis & Nikos Kimionis and Stelios Filippakis. This event is open to the public.

Monday, November 19

9:00 am Conference
Invasion or Asylum?
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Ford Institute for Human Security, University Center for International Studies (UCIS), Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies
See Details

Join us for a conference on drugs, gangs, violence, and migrants in Central America. The Northern Triangle, made up of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, remains one of the deadliest zones in the world, and a source of outward migration. Come and hear why.

November 19, 2018
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building; University of Pittsburgh
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Presented by: The Ford Institute for Human Security, the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS), GSPIA, and the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies.

Tuesday, November 27

11:00 am Panel Discussion
The Transatlantic Relationship: Perspectives from Germany
Location:
270 Mervis Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and International Business Center along with KATZ International Business Assocation and Department of German
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Join for a panel discussion of U.S.-German economic relations and learn more about German economic policies and priorities.

Featured speakers will include:
Dr. Ursina Krumpholz, Head of Commercial and Economic Section, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany
Stephanie Baer, Commercial Officer, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany
Irene Braam, Executive Director, Bertelsmann Foundation
Michael McKeon, Manager, Economic and Legislative Affairs, Bertelsmann Foundation

Moderated by:
Jacqueline Saslawski, International Business Center, Katz School of Business

3:00 pm Presentation
Youth's Revolt against the Non-Democratic Regimes: A Live Interview with Olena Nikolayenko, Fordham University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Children’s Literature and Cultural Studies Program
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At the turn of the twenty-first century, a tide of nonviolent youth movements swept across Eastern Europe demanding political change in repressive political regimes in Serbia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, and Ukraine that emerged since the collapse of communism. This live interview with Olena Nikolayenko will discuss these youth movements and their ability to mobilize citizens against the authoritarian governments on the eve of national elections.

6:30 pm Film
CLAS Cinema Series: The Candidate
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Spanish Film Club
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The Center for Latin American Studies presents the CLAS Cinema Series Fall 2018:
September 11 ... The Future Perfect
October 2 ... On the Roof
October 23 ... Eyes of the Journey
November 6 ... Spider Thieves
November 27 ... The Candidate
December 4 ... The Queen of Spain

Tuesdays at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
6:30 P.M. - Pizza
7:00 P.M. - Movie

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/
Free & Open to the Public!
English subtitles provided.

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies at Pitt, CLAS CINEMA Series, and Spanish Film Club by Pragda

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/

Wednesday, November 28

4:30 pm Workshop
Hot Topics/Global Perspectives
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Thursday, November 29

3:00 pm Career Counselling
Pitt’s Master of Teaching in Foreign Language
Location:
229 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with School of Education
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Interested in teaching a foreign language? Please come to an information session on Pitt's Master of teaching in Foreign Language Program, and speak with University of Pittsburgh faculty, admissions counselors, and alumni from the program.

4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Humanizing the Global; Globalizing the Human
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Laura Brueck, Chair, Asian Languages and Cultures Department; Associate Professor of South Asian Literature and Culture at Northwestern University

Will be presenting to the University of Pittsburgh, Global Studies Center.

Dr. Brueck specializes in modern and contemporary Hindi literature, with a particular focus on literatures of resistance, popular literatures, and translation studies.

5:00 pm Reception
Harris and Matza Book Launch
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
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Come have a glass of wine and celebrate the appearance of two new books! We invite you to a double book launch for Jonathan Harris (Political Science) and Tomas Matza (Anthropology) on Thursday, 29 November (the Thursday after Thanksgiving) from 5.00-6.30 in Posvar 4130. REEES (with the generosity of Anthropology and Political Science) will provide hors’ d’oeuvres, wine, and beer; we hope you will provide the company, interesting conversation, and good spirits!

Friday, November 30

12:30 pm Lecture
What Happened? Religion and Democracy in Brazil's 2018 Presidential Election
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
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What Happened? Religion and Democracy in Brazil's 2018 Presidential Election
Lecture by Amy Erica Smith

In October 2018, Brazil’s far-rightist Jair Bolsonaro won the presidency with a wave of support from Evangelical and Pentecostal citizens. Drawing on a recent four-wave online panel study, this presentation will examine the roles of religion and democratic attitudes in shaping Brazilians’ support for Bolsonaro.

November 30, 2018
12:30 p.m.
4130 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

Free & open to the public!

For more information: ucis.pitt.edu/clas | ket82@pitt.edu

Amy Erica Smith (Ph.D, University of Pittsburgh, 2011) is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University, and author of Religion and Brazilian Democracy: Mobilizing the People of God, which is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. Dr. Smith’s work has been published in top political science journals and supported by funders such as the National Science Foundation and Fulbright. She is excited to come home to Pittsburgh.

3:00 pm Lecture
Cinema after 3/11
Location:
501 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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Dr. Lippit is the T.C. Wang Family Endowed Chair in Cinematic Arts in the Division of Cinema and Media Studies from University of Southern California. His published work includes Electric Animal: Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife (2000), Atomic Light (Shadow Optics) (2005), Ex-Cinema: From a Theory of Experimental Film and Video (2012), and Cinema without Reflection: Jacques Derrida's Echopoiesis and Narcissism Adrift (2016). At present, Lippit is completing a book on contemporary Japanese cinema, which explores the physical and metaphysical dimensions of the "world," and another on David lynch's baroque alphabetics.