Events in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, March 30

(All day) Conference
Symposium | Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology and Pitt Global
See Details

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at http://soyuz.americananthro.org/symposium/.

(All day) Conference
Latin American Social and Public Policy Conference
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference
March 29 - 30, 2019

The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Pittsburgh welcomes faculty and students to the 23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference. At the conference, researchers can present their scholarly work related to social and public policy in Latin America.
Our team is focused on assuring a high-quality and open environment for the exchange of ideas and the improvement of works in progress. Following the multidisciplinary tradition of CLAS, we are interested in facilitating dialogue across disciplines, theoretical perspectives, and methodologies. In that spirit, we encourage the organization of panels around problems, rather than disciplines, and welcome submissions from the social sciences, arts, humanities, and cultural studies.

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Friday, March 29th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
The Seventeenth Carmelo Mesa-Lago Distinguished Latin American Social and Public Policy Keynote Speaker for this year is:
Dr. Aníbal Pérez-Liñán (Professor of Political Science and Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame; Editor-in-Chief, Latin American Research Review; and Co-editor, Kellogg Series in Democracy and Development)

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Saturday, March 30th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
Special Roundtable: The Challenges of the Policy Cycle in Brazilian Politics
Carlos Pereira: Full Professor at the Brazilian Public and Business Administration School, Getulio Vargas Foundation
Barry Ames: Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Pittsburgh
B. Guy Peters: Maurice Falk Professor of American Government at the University of Pittsburgh

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Relevant dates:
Deadline for abstract submission: January 18, 2019 - click here to submit abstracts
Deadline for full paper submission: March 1, 2019
Conference: March 29 and 30, 2019

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For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

Friday, March 29

(All day) Workshop
Climate Change: Workshop on Cap & Trade Initiatives
Location:
Kimbo Conference Room, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
12:00 pm Lecture
Upwardly Mobile Women in Urban China
Location:
2432 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

China's economic growth and urbanization have created new opportunities and roles for women, such as through education, migration, and employment. But with these changes, new challenges arise, especially as these impact on gender norms and relations. In this lecture, Dr. Arianne M. Gaetano, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Women's Studies Program at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama will consider women of different socioeconomic status in the metropolises of Beijing and Shanghai, particularly unmarried and newly married rural migrant workers and educated urban professionals in their 20s and 30s.

Dr. Arianne M. Gaetano is a cultural anthropologist, her research focuses on contemporary Chinese society.

3:00 pm Lecture
BPHIL/IAS Global Studies Defense: Rural-Urban Gendered Migration Pathways and Desires under Neoliberalism Socioeconomic Reform in Contemporary China
Location:
4217 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

SiLang Huang (senior, Politics and Philosophy, BPHIL/IAS Global Studies) will defend her thesis on changes that have taken place under China's neoliberal reform since the 1980s with regard to migratory opportunities, gender roles and social hierarchies, documenting a Chinese migrant family from rural Hunan Province.

5:00 pm Symposium
Keynote Speaker: Soyuz Symposium
Location:
5317 Sennot Square
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Pitt Global and Department of Anthropology
See Details

Keynote Address by Manduhai Buyandelger, Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT, Author of Tragic Spirits: Shamanism, Gender and Memory in Contemporary Mongolia, "Self-Polishing and Electoral Selves: Elections and The New Economies of Democratization in Postsocialist Mongolia"

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Dogman
Location:
Regent Square Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Based on a true crime story that fascinated Italy in the 1980s, DOGMAN follows Marcello, a small and gentle dog groomer. When Marcello is not devoting himself to his dogs or beloved daughter, he sells cocaine on the side. The money helps, but he fears his biggest customer, Simoncino, a former violent boxer who terrorizes the entire neighborhood. After a double-crossing, Marcello will be pushed to his limits and submit to an unexpected act of vengeance. Set in a seedy beachside wasteland, DOGMAN shines a light on the grimy reality of the Italian underworld through bleak directing from Matteo Garrone (GOMORRAH), intimate cinematography, and an empathetic performance from Marcello Fonte. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/dogman.html.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, April 13

7:00 pm Film
Italian Film Festival of Pittsburgh
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of