Events in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, March 30

(All day) Conference
Symposium | Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology and Pitt Global
See Details

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at http://soyuz.americananthro.org/symposium/.

(All day) Conference
Latin American Social and Public Policy Conference
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference
March 29 - 30, 2019

The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Pittsburgh welcomes faculty and students to the 23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference. At the conference, researchers can present their scholarly work related to social and public policy in Latin America.
Our team is focused on assuring a high-quality and open environment for the exchange of ideas and the improvement of works in progress. Following the multidisciplinary tradition of CLAS, we are interested in facilitating dialogue across disciplines, theoretical perspectives, and methodologies. In that spirit, we encourage the organization of panels around problems, rather than disciplines, and welcome submissions from the social sciences, arts, humanities, and cultural studies.

*

Friday, March 29th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
The Seventeenth Carmelo Mesa-Lago Distinguished Latin American Social and Public Policy Keynote Speaker for this year is:
Dr. Aníbal Pérez-Liñán (Professor of Political Science and Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame; Editor-in-Chief, Latin American Research Review; and Co-editor, Kellogg Series in Democracy and Development)

*

Saturday, March 30th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
Special Roundtable: The Challenges of the Policy Cycle in Brazilian Politics
Carlos Pereira: Full Professor at the Brazilian Public and Business Administration School, Getulio Vargas Foundation
Barry Ames: Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Pittsburgh
B. Guy Peters: Maurice Falk Professor of American Government at the University of Pittsburgh

*

Relevant dates:
Deadline for abstract submission: January 18, 2019 - click here to submit abstracts
Deadline for full paper submission: March 1, 2019
Conference: March 29 and 30, 2019

*

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, April 13

7:00 pm Film
Italian Film Festival of Pittsburgh
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of

Saturday, March 30

1:00 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: The Great War 1914-1918
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Nationality Rooms, Pitt Global and Serb National Federation
See Details

Book presented by Bishop Irinej and Krinka V. Petrov. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

The book is dedicated to the Great War, an event that shook the world one hundred years ago. Within this vast historical frame-work, this book focuses on the relationship between two Allies—the Kingdom of Serbia and the United States of America, including the role of the Serbian American Diaspora. The chapters in this book deal with general issues regarding Serbia’s role in the Great War, beginning with the event that would trigger the war and put the small town of Sarajevo on the world map. This book offers a wealth of information as well as a fascinating narrative of the human urge to resist, survive, and be free to live and love.

1:00 pm Film
Serbian Movie Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 232 and Cathedral of Learning 324
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with Center for Russian and East European Studies, Yugoslav Room Committee and Serb National Federation
See Details

A film series promoting the rich cultural heritage of Serbia.
1:00 p.m.- The Great War 1914-1918
2:30 p.m.- The Long Road to War
4:45 p.m.- Twice Upon a Time
6:00 p.m.- Tesla Nation

2:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Liyana
Location:
Rangos Giant Cinema, Carnegie Science Center
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Under the guidance of acclaimed South African storyteller, Gcina Mhlophe, a group of orphaned children in the Kingdom of Swaziland confront past trauma through the collaborative creation of their own fictional story depicted through vivid animation. Their young heroine, Liyana, must embark on a dangerous quest to save her brothers after their home is violently attacked and her siblings are stolen away. Confronting painful memories, profound insights are revealed as the children shape Liyana’s mythic journey and parallels are drawn between her fate and that of the young storytellers. Named one of the Best Family Movies of the Year by HuffPost, LIYANA is for storytellers of any age. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/liyana.html.

2:30 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: The Long Road to War
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This film screening is part of the Serbian Film Festival. The Long Road to War directed by Milos Skundric. Pizza and light refreshments served.

What was a real cause and trigger of World War I? World War I began a month after the Sarajevoassassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, in 1914. But this stake had been prepared decades before. The Long Road to War is a feature-length cinema documentary about the origins of WWI. Leading European intellectuals from Oxford, Cambridge, Sorbonne, and other universities present their views about the causes and trigger of World War I. The movie leads the public through the political games behind the scenes and presents details when the decision was made about the future of Europe. The documentary utilizes film and photographs from some fifteen archival houses
around the world, so it is “more action – less talking heads on screen.” Milos Skundric, Director, says that he was shocked to learn how little he and his generation knew about the reason behind this “seminal catastrophe of the 20th century.”

4:45 pm Film
Serbian Movie Festival: Twice Upon a Time
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This event is part of the Serbian Movie Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

Twice Upon a Time, directed by Vojin Vasovic.
All children for the cartoon will receive a gift from the SNF.
This is an amusing and educational cartoon for children and adults. Once upon a time, in some distant world lived two kings: King of Warrior and King of Poet. In fact, it is about the dual nature and split personality of one king. One half of his personality represents a Nordic barbaric king from the early Middle Ages, a crude but fearless warrior. The other half is from late Baroque, a man of graceful poise and manners. They share their conscience, but have opposing wishes and desperately want to get rid of each other. This story brings us a noble message which can enrich our lives. The cartoon was screened at 60 international movie festivals and won more than 20 international awards.

6:00 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: Tesla Nation
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This film screening is a part of the Serbian Film Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served. Tesla Nation directed by Zeljko Mirkovic.

This marvelous documentary leads us through the Serbian-American history which spans more than 200 years. Serbian-American history began in a symbolic way with Djordje Sagic aka George Fisher who arrived through the port of Philadelphia at the beginning of the ninetieth century. After him, Serbian immigrants came in several waves and helped shape American history. The movie describes Serbian-American contributions
in building the United States and the world and the importance of preserving the Serbian heritage. Zeljko Jack Dimich, the Serbian-American Actor from New York, plays Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American Scientist and Inventor, and is the narrator of the movie. The movie was sponsored by the Serb National Federation among others, and produced by Optimistic Film and Radio Television of Serbia.

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Blindspotting
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

BLINDSPOTTING is a landmark film that blends poetry, rap, buddy comedy, and social commentary to depict life in the increasingly “hip” Oakland. Collin, played by Hamilton star Daveed Diggs, faces his final three days of probation and needs to stay clear of trouble. Miles, his troublemaking childhood best friend, can’t stay out of it. When Collin witnesses a police shooting, the two men’s friendship is tested as they grapple with identity, racism, and changed realities in the rapidly-gentrifying neighborhood they grew up in. This bold and thought-provoking film bursts with energy, style, and humor while also providing a relevant examination of Black America through the use of hip/hop and rap poetically performed by the two likeable leads. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/Blindspotting.html.

8:00 pm Performance
Afropop Ensemble: Spring Concert
Location:
Bellefield Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of
See Details

In 1988, a radio series called Public Radio International (PRI) coined the term “Afropop” to refer to a cross section of traditional and urban music styles that originated or had roots in Africa. At their recital On 30 March 2019, the Pitt Afropop Ensemble will perform Afropop music that has either been influenced or has influenced other music styles from the Americas and Europe. The performance on March 30 will have the Pitt Afropop ensemble students expose Afro-reggae, highlife, Afrobeat and Afro-jazz, genres that have resulted from the fusion of African and Western musics. The performance will specifically focus on exposing what I refer to as sonic migrations between Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Caribbean. “Sonic Migrations” is an exploration of how sound has traveled from Africa to other locations of the world and back to Africa. The event will expose connections between rumba of Cuba and soukous from the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Jamaican reggae and Afro-reggae.

Dr. David Aarons, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, will give a talk on the connections between Jamaican reggae and Afro-reggae. Dr. Aarons has studied the migrations of Jamaican people and their music to Ethiopia. He joined the faculty at UNCG in 2018 and currently teaches such courses as “American Music” and “Music of World Cultures”.

Admission:
Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $8.50; non-Pitt students and seniors are $5. At the door: general admission is $12; non-Pitt students and seniors are $8. Pitt students: free with valid ID.