Events in UCIS

Friday, November 1 until Sunday, May 3

5:00 pm Seminar
Global Health and Gender Equality- SDG 5
Location:
2400 Sennott Square
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Office of the Vice Provost Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

With each global health crisis, the interconnectedness of populations around the globe becomes more pronounced. Diseases not only affect the health of communities, but they have a profound impact on political, economic, and social stability within countries and regions. This course engages the interdisciplinary nature of global health by approaching the issue through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) developed by the United Nations. The SDGs range in focus from good health and well-being to gender equality to clean water and sanitation to affordable, clean energy. By engaging the ways that health has a stake in these goals, the course will bring the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and CMU as well as practitioners to understand and address the issue surrounding global health from a myriad of perspectives and avenues. With an applied focus, the course will assist students in engaging and advocating for a community on a global health issue through a policy memo. This iteration of the course will examine gender equality and SDG #5.

Thursday, November 14

12:30 pm Symposium
Institute for International Studies in Education Symposium Series
Location:
4318 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with School of Education
4:00 pm Lecture
Panoramas Round: The Use of Democracy as a Justification for Anti-Democratic Actions: How the Nature of Powerful Authoritarian Governments have Changed Over Time
Location:
4219 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas
4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
The Visibility of Perception. On the Experience of Urban Environments
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Andrea Mubi Brighenti is Aggregate Professor of Social Theory and Space & Culture at the Department of Sociology, University of Trento, Italy. Research topics focus on space, power and society. He has published The Ambiguous Multiplicities: Materials, episteme and politics of some cluttered social formations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Visibility in Social Theory and Social Research (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and Territori migranti [Migrant Territories. Space and Control of Global Mobility] (ombre corte, 2009). Has edited Urban Interstices. The Aesthetics and Politics of Spatial In-betweens(Ashgate, 2013), Uma Cidade de Imagens (Mundos Sociais, 2012 – with Ricardo Campos and Luciano Spinelli), and The Wall and the City (professionaldreamers, 2009). Urban Walls. Political and Cultural Meanings of Vertical Surfaces (Routledge, 2018, co-edited with Mattias Kärrholm).

4:30 pm Lecture
The Visibility of Perception. On the Experience of Urban Environments
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Hub
See Details

Andrea Mubi Brighenti is Aggregate Professor of Social Theory and Space & Culture at the Department of Sociology, University of Trento, Italy. Research topics focus on space, power and society. He has published The Ambiguous Multiplicities: Materials, episteme and politics of some cluttered social formations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Visibility in Social Theory and Social Research (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and Territori migranti [Migrant Territories. Space and Control of Global Mobility] (ombre corte, 2009). Has edited Urban Interstices. The Aesthetics and Politics of Spatial In-betweens(Ashgate, 2013), Uma Cidade de Imagens (Mundos Sociais, 2012 – with Ricardo Campos and Luciano Spinelli), and The Wall and the City (professionaldreamers, 2009). Urban Walls. Political and Cultural Meanings of Vertical Surfaces (Routledge, 2018, co-edited with Mattias Kärrholm).

5:00 pm Lecture
Japan Speaker Series: Animal Stories
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

A surprising number of animals appear in the fictional representations of the March 11, 2011 disasters in Japan. Why? My hunch is that the portrayal of animal inferiorities and portrayal of disaster are linked by narrative challenges and techniques: they both are "impossible." Furukawa Hideo has been writing through animals for some time, and with added poignancy after the Tohoku disasters; this presentation focuses on his fiction of Furukawa Hideo to examine his exploration of the fictional possibilities, and limits, of portraying animal inferiorities in fiction.

5:30 pm Film
Women of the Gulag: Film Screening & Discussion with the Director
Location:
Auditorium 125, Frick Fine Arts
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Carnegie Mellon Department of History and Carnegie Mellon Department of Modern Languages
See Details

Women of the Gulag tells the compelling and tragic stories of six women as last survivors of the Gulag. Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago largely tells of the men caught in Stalin's camps and special settlements for "crimes against the state." Women of the Gulag, features six women in their eighties and nineties as they tell their stories while going about their daily lives in remote Urals villages, in break-away Sukhumi, or in Moscow suburbs. Their only hesitancy to speak out relates to sexual violence, about which they would only hint. Sadly, three died shortly after their interviews.

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Turkish Language Table
Location:
Pitt Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Less-Commonly-Taught-Languages Center