Events in UCIS

Friday, November 1 until Sunday, May 3

5:00 pm Seminar
Global Health and Gender Equality- SDG 5
Location:
2400 Sennott Square
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Office of the Vice Provost Carnegie Mellon University
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With each global health crisis, the interconnectedness of populations around the globe becomes more pronounced. Diseases not only affect the health of communities, but they have a profound impact on political, economic, and social stability within countries and regions. This course engages the interdisciplinary nature of global health by approaching the issue through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) developed by the United Nations. The SDGs range in focus from good health and well-being to gender equality to clean water and sanitation to affordable, clean energy. By engaging the ways that health has a stake in these goals, the course will bring the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and CMU as well as practitioners to understand and address the issue surrounding global health from a myriad of perspectives and avenues. With an applied focus, the course will assist students in engaging and advocating for a community on a global health issue through a policy memo. This iteration of the course will examine gender equality and SDG #5.

Friday, November 15

8:30 am Award Ceremony
Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership 2019 Emerging Leader Award
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership and Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
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The Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership is pleased to announce this year's Emerging Leader Award recipient, Samir Lakhani, founder of the nonprofit Eco-Soap Bank a global soap-recycling organization which operates in 11 countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

This annual celebration recognizes the accomplishments of individuals who, relatively early in their professional careers, have demonstrated exceptional leadership qualities and high promise of future contributions.

Friday, November 15, 2019
8:30 a.m.
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building (2nd Floor)
The award ceremony is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.
RSVP gspiaji@pitt.edu

Samir Lakhani is a social entrepreneur dedicated to restoring health and dignity to developing countries through environmental initiatives. Prior to founding Eco-Soap Bank in 2014, Lakhani was deeply involved in climate-resilient aquaculture and nutrition projects in northern Cambodian villages. To date, Eco-Soap Bank has reached over 1.3 million people with recycled soap and free hygiene education. In 2017, Samir received a CNN Heroes Award and Rotary Presidential Peacebuilding Award for his work with global hygiene. Samir Lakhani graduated in 2015 from the University of Pittsburgh with a concentration in Environmental Studies in the Department of Geology.

12:00 pm Presentation
Conversations with Alumni: Waseem Mardini '08
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, Global Hub and National Consortium on Teaching About Asia along with UCIS International Career Toolkit Series
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Waseem Mardini is a 2008 graduate from the University of Pittsburgh. He then went on to obtain his Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University, studying subjects such as Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Sustainable Development. He has worked in New York City and Washington, DC, working for groups such as the Foundation for Middle East Peace, Equitable Origin, and the Arab American Institute. He was the Policy Advisor at Publish What You Pay, where he focused on the corruption in the oil, gas and mining sectors. He also has worked on governance of extractive industries, transparency and accountability, international human rights law, and international corporate responsibility standards. Furthermore, Mr. Mardini has experience in researching human rights violations and conflict in the Middle East. Currently, he works as a Project Manager for KnowTheChain, an organization devoted to educating companies and investors about forced labor and what it means to be transparent and accountable.

3:00 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa: The Role of Non-kin in Providing Elder Care: A Forgotten History in Ghana
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies along with Department of Africana Studies, Department of History, African Studies Program, University Center for International Studies and University of Pittsburgh
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Cati Coe is a Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on transnational migration, care, and education in West Africa. She is the author of The New American Servitude: Political Belonging among African Immigrant Home Care Workers (2019) and The Scattered Family: African Migrants, Parenting and Global Inequality (2013). She was a co-editor of Transnational Aging and Reconfigurations of Kin Work (2017) and Everyday Ruptures: Children, Youth, and Migration in Global Perspective (2011).

In contemporary Ghana, adult children are considered responsible for the care of aged parents. Within this idealized framework, two aspects of elder care are overlooked. First, such a narrative obscures the role of non-kin and extended kin in providing elder care in southern Ghana historically and in the present. Secondly, it hides the negotiations over obligations and commitments between those who manage elder care and those who help with an aging person’s daily activities. It is in this latter role in which non-kin and extended kin are significant in elder care, while closer kin maintain their kin roles through the more distant management, financial support, and recruitment of others. This talk examines recruitment to elder care and the role of kin and non-kin in elder care in three historical periods—the 1860s, the 1990s, and the 2000s—centered on Akuapem, in southern Ghana. In particular, it shows that helping an aged person relies on previous and expected entrustments, in which more vulnerable, dependent, and indebted persons are most likely to be recruited to provide care.

4:30 pm Workshop
Faculty Workshop with Andrea Mubi Brighenti
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Andrea Mubi Brighenti is Aggregate Professor of Social Theory and Space & Culture at the Department of Sociology, University of Trento, Italy. Research topics focus on space, power and society. He has published The Ambiguous Multiplicities: Materials, episteme and politics of some cluttered social formations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Visibility in Social Theory and Social Research (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and Territori migranti [Migrant Territories. Space and Control of Global Mobility] (ombre corte, 2009). Has edited Urban Interstices. The Aesthetics and Politics of Spatial In-betweens(Ashgate, 2013), Uma Cidade de Imagens (Mundos Sociais, 2012 – with Ricardo Campos and Luciano Spinelli), and The Wall and the City (professionaldreamers, 2009). Urban Walls. Political and Cultural Meanings of Vertical Surfaces (Routledge, 2018, co-edited with Mattias Kärrholm).