Events in UCIS

Thursday, February 20 until Friday, February 21

(All day) Cultural Event
Washington DC Career Networking Trip
Location:
Washington, DC
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center
See Details

Together the African Studies, Global Studies, and Russian/East European Studies Centers are organizing a career networking trip to Washington D.C. on February 20-21, 2020. Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different career opportunities and gain an insider’s perspective on the different organizations in Washington, D.C. Meetings will be arranged into four different content areas:

• Global Health
• Human Rights/Human Security
• International Security and Diplomacy
• International Development

Along with scheduled meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, and government agencies there will be a reception to meet UCIS and Pitt alumni. Pending funding, up to forty students will be selected to go with representation from all the centers.

Friday, February 21

10:00 am Cultural Event
Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian Language Table
Location:
Pitt Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Hub
See Details

Practice your Bosnian, Serbian, or Croatian language skills at our weekly language table.

12:00 pm Presentation
Yasuda Women's University Poster Presentation
Location:
Pitt Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with English Language Institute
See Details

Students from Yasuda Women's University who are a part of Pitt's English Language Institute will be presenting their research posters on U.S. culture. Come by to celebrate their hard work and learn about their findings!

1:00 pm Student Club Activity
Social Hour with Global Studies Ambassadors
Location:
Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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The Global Studies Center looks forward to beginning a monthly, informal social hour - hosted by Global Studies Ambassadors and fellow GSC students Mark, Sarah and Destiny - as a way to get to know other like-minded Global Studies students.

2:00 pm Cultural Event
Modern Greek Language Table
Location:
Pitt Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Less-Commonly-Taught-Languages Center
See Details

Practice your Modern Greek language skills - all levels welcome!

3:00 pm Lecture
Making Green Tea for America - and for Japan
Location:
4130 Wesley Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and National Consortium on Teaching About Asia
See Details

Join Professor Robert Hellyer of Wake Forest University for a discussion on the socio-economic history of green tea in America and Japan in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Soon after the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Japan dramatically expanded tea production—especially of high-quality sencha green tea—specifically to meet demand from the United States, then a green tea consuming nation. This presentation will outline that export trade highlighting how tea production helped to ease social tensions in the nascent Japanese nation-state by providing employment for Tokugawa retainers who had opposed the new central regime during the Boshin War (1868-1869). It will also explain the ways in which a change in American tastes—the 1920s’ embrace of black teas produced in South Asia—brought a decline in Japanese tea exports to the United States. Facing a glut, Japanese tea merchants aggressively marketed sencha at home for the first time, emphasizing its health benefits. As a result, more Japanese began to consume sencha, setting in motion a trend that made that type of green tea the definitive daily beverage it remains today.

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Asian Studies Center, University Center for East Asian Studies

3:00 pm Lecture
The Austrian School of Economics, History, and China in the 1930s
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

This talk introduces the social scientist and economic philosopher, Wang Yanan, and his 1930s Chinese critique of the Austrian School of Economics. Wang was an original translator of Marx, Smith, and Ricardo, and by the late 1930s, he had turned his attention to the seeming "common sense" of the Austrians in order to thoroughly refute their flat version of the world. Part of my recently published book "The Magic of Concepts" (Duke University Press 2017), this talk presents a historical consideration of capitalist economic concepts as they helped shape Chinese understandings of their simultaneously local and global worlds.

4:00 pm Cultural Event
ADDverse Poetry Collective Meeting
Location:
Pitt Global Hub
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Hub along with Department of Africana Studies