Week of February 4, 2018 in UCIS

Monday, February 5

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

4:00 pm Reception
Graduate Student Happy Hour
Location:
University Club Library
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Graduate students are invited to join Director, Michael Goodhart, and other GSC members to share their experiences, suggestions, and ideas over drinks and hors d'oeuvres as we revisit our graduate certificate.

Tuesday, February 6

4:30 pm Lecture
Planning Postindustrialism in Pittsburgh and Beyond
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Tracy Neumann specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century North American history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. She teaches courses on twentieth-century U.S. history, urban history, research methods, and public history. Before pursuing a PhD, she worked for several years as a consultant for a cultural resource management firm, and her professional experience as a public history practitioner led her to help develop Wayne State's MA Program in Public History, for which she serves as the coordinator. She also co-edits the Global Urban History blog and sits on the editorial boards of Urban History and Temple University Press's Pennsylvania History book series.

More information about the event TBA.

5:00 pm Teacher Training
Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session, we will be reading Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones and hear from Pitt Prof. Felix Germain (Africana Studies).

6:30 pm Film
Rojo Amanecer (Mexico)
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
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CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Rojo Amanecer (Jorge Fons, Mexico, 1990)
*In Spanish and No English Subtitles!

The ONLY film to be shown at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
6:30 p.m. Pizza
7:00 p.m. Movie
Free and open to the public!
Sponsored by: The Center for Latin American Studies and the Spanish Film Club by Pragda.

Rojo Amenecer is a film about the Tlatelolco Massacre in the section of Tlatelolco in Mexico City in the evening of October 2, 1968. It focuses on the day of a middle-class Mexican family living in one of the apartment buildings surrounding the Plaza de Tlatelolco (also known as the Plaza de las Tres Culturas)[1] and is based on testimonials from witnesses and victims.

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, February 7

12:00 pm Workshop
Professional Development Webinars - The German-speaking Academia: A Road Map to Navigating Research Institutions Beyond Universities
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research in East-Central Europe
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Our center is excited to announce the launch of professional development webinars offered by the Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe. Are you a scholar or academic professional curious about European higher education and research? Discover opportunities to enhance your career mobility and research. This series is co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center.

Germany provides a highly developed network of university and non-university expertise for Eastern Europe and the post-Soviet states. The first webinar presented by the Herder Institute will provide a survey of all existing centers and institutions, and give an overview about their regional focus, research hubs, collections and infrastructures. For the purpose of drawing a more general picture, the discussion will include centers located in Austria and Switzerland in addition to those in Germany. Participants will gain insight into the present state and future development of East European Studies in these three countries and will learn how to organize a research trip and find the best opportunity for individual topics.

To register, visit http://aseees.org/programs/webinars.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Next webinar

March 7, 12 p.m. (EST)
Introducing the Herder Institute: Collections, Funding Opportunities, and Higher Education Partnerships

Thursday, February 8 until Friday, February 9

(All day) Career Counselling
Washington D.C. Trip 1
Location:
Various, Washington D.C.
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center
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Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different careers and gain an insider's perspective on the different organizations. Students will participate in one of the four tracks:
* Global Health and Development
* Diplomacy and Security
* International Development and Education
* Human Rights and Refugees

Along with meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, government agencies there will be a reception to meet center alumni. A total of 44 students will be selected to go (from 4 participating UCIS centers.)

Thursday, February 8

4:00 pm Lecture
1968: The Ambiguous Consequences of a Failed Revolution
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
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The multiple uprisings of 1968 challenged authorities worldwide, and led to many reforms, but the insurgents misunderstood the nature of their insurgencies, and this misunderstanding drastically limited their effects. They did not add up to a revolution. Rather, in their multiplicity, they were something far more complicated and ambiguous: the culmination of an era of incremental progressive change, a signal of the collapse of conventional liberalism, and a prologue to deep cultural changes as well as grim backlash

Friday, February 9

10:00 am Presentation
Novetta-Advanced Analytics Career Talk
Location:
4209 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
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Graduate student career talk with Elise Thorsen about her work at Novetta-Advanced Analytics

12:00 pm Lecture
A Conversation with Samir Lakhani
Location:
Alumni Hall, 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, David Berg Center for Ethics and Leadership, innovation Institute and Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
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Samir was a college student volunteering in a rural Cambodian village when he witnessed firsthand the spread of disease due to poor personal hygiene. Today, Samir’s non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, recycles bars of soap from hotels in Cambodia and distributes them to those in need.

2:30 pm Lecture
Using Algorithms to Read Pushkin's Poetry
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
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Quantitative metrics, and particularly the statistical study of meter and rhyme, has been a core research methodology in Russian verse theory and scholarship at least since the early twentieth century both among Russian scholars (e.g., Belyj, Taranovski, Gasparov) and abroad (e.g., Shaw, Scherr, Friedberg). Until recently, the methods have had to rely largely on the laborious and unscalable human identification and tagging or recording of all individual stress and rhyme phenomena, which have then served as input into the (often computer-assisted) statistical analysis of synchronic patterns and diachronic trends in meter and rhyme. Almost the entire corpus of Russian classical verse is now freely accessible on the Internet in authoritative scholarly digital editions, and computational tools could therefore be used to relieve scholars of the human labor previously needed to prepare and collect the data needed for studies in quantitative versification. To the extent that the data preparation and analysis proceeds algorithmically, intermediate results can be saved and examined and the entire process can be replicated and verified. Under discussion in this presentation are the computational aids that the "Meter, Rhythm, and Rhyme" project team has been developing to build poetic corpora, with particular attention to Alexander Pushkin’s verse.

3:00 pm Lecture
Sound of Japanese Street Demonstrations from the Antinuclear Movement to Pro-Democracy Protests
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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The Fukushima nuclear accident has launched a series of ongoing social movements in Japan—the antinuclear movement; the anti-racist movement; and the protests against such policies as the Secrecy Law, the Security Bill, and the Conspiracy Law. This talk examines the ways in which musicians' and activists' responses have shifted with political developments in recent social movements. Beginning with an overview of the circumstances surrounding the nuclear crisis and the four spaces in which musicians engage in politics, the talk will then focus on street demonstrations, and in particular, the roles played by drum corps, chants, and sound trucks, the conflicting philosophies behind them, and the shifts that have occurred as the framing and the participants of the protests has changed.

3:00 pm Lecture
Healthy Global Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship
Location:
William Pitt Union 630
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Director's Office, Global Studies Center and Study Abroad Office along with Center for Cross Cultural Leadership and Development
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Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Interested in a career with a non-profit—or in developing a new NGO that will change lives? You’re sure to gain insight and inspiration from Samir.

5:30 pm Lecture
Fireside Chat
Location:
University Club, Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, innovation Institute and World Affairs Council
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Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Samir joins Audrey Murrell, associate dean of Pitt’s College of Business Administration, for a conversation about ethics, leadership and global entrepreneurship in the 21st century.