Week of April 8, 2018 in UCIS

Thursday, March 22 until Sunday, April 8

(All day) Festival
2018 Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival
Location:
Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Humanities Center at Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

The mission of the Carnegie Mellon International “Faces” Film Festival is to engage the Pittsburgh community with all-encompassing programming that promotes cultural exchange and expression, and through film, illuminates the local and global ethnic communities which seldom have opportunities to celebrate their artwork and culture on a large public scale. By collaborating with guest filmmakers, arts organizations, and local businesses, the festival creates a platform for these ethnic groups to expose the Pittsburgh community to their cultures, allows attendees to identify and relate to their own origins, and for cinematic artists to engage audiences with their films and dialogues.

Sunday, April 8

4:00 pm Film
Human Flow
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with CMU International Film Festival Sponsors
See Details

Human Flow is an epic portrait of mass migration that understands how a lack of empathy often stems from a failure of imagination.”

- David Ehrlich, Indiewire

Artist, activist, and director Ai Weiwei captures the worldwide refugee crisis in this breathtakingly epic journey. In this global point of view, Weiwei visits 23 different countries to follow refugees’ quest for things every human needs: safety, shelter, peace, and the opportunity to be who we are.

Ai Weiwei is a renowned artist born in Beijing and currently works in both Beijing and Berlin. Ai is known for working in a variety of mediums, from architecture to installations, social media to documentaries, to express new ways to examine global society and its values. Recent exhibitions include: Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., translocation - transformation at 21er Haus in Vienna, and #SafePassage at Foam in Amsterdam. He currently serves as the Einstein Visiting Professor at the Berlin University of the Arts. Ai has made numerous award-winning documentaries about social and political issues, including Disturbing the Peace (2009), So Sorry (2012), and Ai Weiwei’s Appeal ¥15,220,910.50 (2014).

5:00 pm Film
Spectacles: The Film Series
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 407
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Religious Studies Department
See Details

Once a month, Spectacles invites religious studies, cultural studies, and film studies enthusiasts to join together and watch a movie with religious themes. Afterwards, religious studies majors will lead an open discussion about the movie. And of course, there will be snacks! This month, we will be showing our final movie of the semester.

Please refer to the religious studies website (http://www.religiousstudies.pitt.edu/), or the facebook event (https://www.facebook.com/events/186840558738323/) for more details.

6:00 pm Film
Screening of Satyajit Ray’s film: Pather Panchali
Location:
REGENT SQUARE THEATRE
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of University of Pittsburgh Film and Media Studies Program, Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and Silk Screen Film Festival
See Details

Introduced by Kuhu Tanvir, PhD student in Film and Media Studies.

Satyajit Ray’s 1955 debut of Pather Panchali introduced an eloquent and important new cinematic voice that made itself heard all over the world. A depiction of rural Bengali life in a style inspired by Italian neorealism, this naturalistic but poetic evocation of a number of years in the life of a family introduces us to both little Apu and, just as essentially, the women who will help shape him: his independent older sister, Durga; his harried mother, Sarbajaya, who, with her husband away, must hold the family together; and his kindly and mischievous elderly “auntie,” Indir—vivid, multifaceted characters all. With resplendent photography informed by its young protagonist’s perpetual sense of discovery, Pather Panchali, which won an award for Best Human Document at Cannes, is an immersive cinematic experience and a film of elemental power. Satyajit Ray, India, 1955, 2h 5min

This film is part of the Classic Asian Film Series held weekly at Regent Square.
Admission $8

Tuesday, April 10

12:00 pm Presentation
2018 Symposium Series: Connecting the Local and the Global I
Location:
4119 Wesley W. Posvar Hall (IISE Seminar Room)
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Institute for International Education
See Details

This event is free and open to public. Two presentations will be given on that day:
Challenging Car Culture: Shifting Bikes into the US Cultural Norm-- by SCAE Ph.D. student, Christopher Chirdon
A Qualitative Study on the Knowledge Structure of Front-Line Workers in Service Occupations-- by IISE Visiting Scholar, Zheng Li

4:30 pm Workshop
Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Wednesday, April 11

12:00 pm Workshop
Professional Development Webinars - Doing Research on Eastern Europe in the EU: Research Infrastructures, Grant Models, and Career Mobility
Location:
http://aseees.org/programs/webinars
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East-Central Europe
See Details

This webinar is the third in a professional development series co-sponsored by the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the European Studies Center. This webinar will focus on career patterns in academia as well as in the field of infrastructure development in EU-countries. Participants will learn about the formats, chances and challenges for developing a strategy for one’s transnational career path. Against this backdrop and providing significant examples, Peter Haslinger will explain about bilateral and cross-European funding programs - this will also include some thoughts about advancing transatlantic exchange in the field of Eastern European Studies.

Speaker's Bio: Peter Haslinger is Professor of East-Central European History at the Justus Liebig University Giessen and Director of the Herder Institute in Marburg, a research institution affiliated with the Leibniz Association and specializing in the history, art history and digital humanities of East Central Europe. Dr. Haslinger is Principal Investigator at the Giessen Center for Eastern European Studies, the International Center for the Study of Culture, and the Center for Media and Interactivity, all located at the Justus Liebig University. He likewise functions as a spokesperson for the Herder Institute Research Academy, which aims to bridge the gap between scholarship in Eastern European Studies and the development of research infrastructures. His scholarly interest focuses on the history of the Habsburg Monarchy and successor states in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published widely on Hungarian, Czech and Slovak history as well as on questions of nation, region and cultural diversity, on cartography and questions of security. Dr. Haslinger is the spokesperson for the project group that enhances the visibility of Eastern European Studies across disciplines within the Leibniz Association. He is likewise involved in activities for the enhancement of the Humanities and Social Sciences on the European level, among others as a member of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Network board.

Webinars scheduled for Fall 2018:

August
How to Work in Archives in Eastern Europe and Germany

September
Archival Skills

October
Strategies for Career Building and Publishing in the EU versus the US

6:00 pm Lecture
The Tucci-Cornetti Lecture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian Languages and Literatures, Department of Theatre Arts, Humanities Center and University Honors College
See Details

Gianni Clementi is a prolific Italian playwright who has written a number of plays that deconstruct common stereotypes about immigration and look critically at notions of both Italianess and otherness. Drawing on postcolonial theory and migration studies, this paper considers how Clementi's plays, "Ben Hur", "Finis Terrae" and "Clandestini" challenge the otherness with which immigrants are often charged in Italy's media and politics and focuses on the notion of mare nostrum as a hybrid site where individuals of different races and ethnicities negotiate their respective differences.
In order to challenge the homogenizing rhetoric of national identity, Clementi interweaves African legends, Judeo-Christian narratives, and various languages and dialects. The playwright successfully confounds the temporal frames of his plays so that the current migration in the Mediterranean becomes reminiscent of both the Atlantic Middle Passage of African slaves and the 19th and 20th-century Italian emigration. These dramaturgical strategies create meaningful frames of reference through which spectators can experience the limitations of geopolitics, engage with a postcolonial critique of Italian history, and reflect on the possibility of peaceful cohabitation.

Thursday, April 12

5:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research. For more information about the symposium, contact Dr. Brock Bahler (bab145@pitt.edu).

Thursday, April 12 until Monday, April 23

7:00 pm Festival/Film
Italian Film Festival 2018
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Department of French & Italian, Volpi, Istituto Italiano di Cultura New York, Heinz History Center Italian American Collection, Dante Alighieri Society of Pittsburgh, Mondo Italiano, Ameriprise Financial, Arancini House and John J. Suppa Insurance
See Details

MOVIE SCHEDULE:
Thursday April 5th - 7pm FINCHE' C'E' PROSECCO (The Last Prosecco) @ Alumni Hall
Friday April 6th - 7pm EARS - ORECCHIE (Ears) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 7th - 7pm L'ORDINE DELLE COSE (The Order of Things) ​@ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Wednesday April 18th - 7pm FUNNE, LE RAGAZZE CHE SOGNAVANO IL MARE (Funne, Sea Dreaming Girls) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Thursday April 19th - 7pm EASY @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Friday April 20th - 7pm TUTTO QUELLO CHE VUOI (Friends By Chance) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Saturday April 21st - 7pm IN GUERRA PER AMORE (At War for Love) @ Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

Questions about the festival? Contact Pittsburgh's Spotlight Sponsor of the Festival, Istituto Mondo Italiano, at mondoitaliano@earthlink.net.

Friday, April 13

(All day) Symposium
European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Location:
527, 538, and 548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
See Details

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

9:45 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Keota Fields [UMass, Dartmouth], “Implicit Biases as Perceptual Skills: Is Anyone to Blame?”
Dr. Katherine Tullmann [Grand Valley State University], “Implicit Bias and Racialized Seeing: Development, Harm, and Moral Responsibility”

11:30 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Dan Flory [Montana State University], “Three Kinds of Racialized Disgust in Film”
Dr. Janine Jones [UNC Greensboro], “Perceiving Anti-Black Space: Where’s the Glitch?”

1:45 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Lacey Davidson [PhD candidate, Purdue University] & Dr. Daniel Kelly [Purdue], “Minding the Gap: Individual Biases, Soft Structures, and the Psychology of Social Norms”
Dr. Terrance MacMullan [Eastern Washington University], “The American Redoubt and the Coyolxauqui Imperative”

3:00 pm Lecture
The Unknown Patient: Medicine, Mystery & the City
Location:
3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology
See Details

What does it mean to solve a city through bodies? This paper draws from ongoing ethnographic research in a municipal public hospital trauma ward in Mumbai. The talk centers on a key figure in this context, the “Unknown” patient — this is the term for a patient who arrives to the ward without clear identity. Unknown patients underscore the challenge of trying to survive without kin. As mysteries of personhood get worked out alongside resuscitation, surgery, and intensive care, the ward's ethics and actions cut through different genres of sociality, including state bureaucracy, hospital emergency drama, detective mystery, and pulp crime. Problems of the city become problems for medicine and law to solve together. Knowing and feeling noir urbanism meshes with knowing and feeling bodily injury and repair. Ultimately, this raises broader questions about how to understand bodies and cities in tandem.

5:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.

Saturday, April 14

(All day) Symposium
2018 Islamic Studies Research Symposium
Location:
Duquesne University, 719 Fisher Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Consortium for Christian-Muslim Dialogue (CCMD) at Duquesne University
See Details

The public is invited to attend the 2018 Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) Symposium. The day will highlight the work of our faculty and students at our 30 member institutions. It will also serve as a celebration of the first fifteen years of CERIS’s accomplishments. This conference will take place on Saturday starting at 8:45 AM in 719 Fisher Hall with welcoming remarks. Studenst from 9 institutions will present their work from 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM, poetry reading by University of Pittsburgh student Emilio Rodriguez "Love, Worship, War, Life", our keynote address by Amir Hussian "Researching and Teaching about American Muslims" is at 11:00 AM, lunch at 12 Noon. Faculty from 8 institutions will present their research on simultaneous panels from 1 PM - 2:30 PM, and CERIS reflections will conclude the day. For complete program go to http://www.cerisnet.org/resource/2018-ceris-research-symposium.

9:30 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with This symposium has been generously sponsored by the following grants: The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Office of Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant Program, the Humanities Center Collaborative Research Grant, the Hewlett International Grant Program, and the Pitt Interdisciplinary Humanities Grant. The symposium has also been generously co-sponsored by the following departments and centers: Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and and the Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Hanan al-Khalaf [Kuwait University], “The Structure of Embodied Oppression: A Merleau-Pontyan Approach to Iris Young”
Dr. Erin Beeghly [University of Utah], “Embodiment & Oppression: Reflections on Haslanger”

11:15 am Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Department of Africana Studies, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Center for Philosophy of Science, Department of Philosophy, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Will Penman [ABD, CMU], “Rhetorical Debriefing as a Strategy for Rewriting Racial Logics”
Dr. Brock Bahler [University of Pittsburgh], “The Embodied Practices of Whiteness: Child Development, Extended Mind, and Habitus”

12:00 pm Festival
Latin American & Caribbean Festival
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall: Galleria, First Floor
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies: Latin American & Caribbean Festival

Latin American & Caribbean Festival (CLAS)
April 14, 2018
Noon-8 pm
Free and open to the public.

Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Galleria, First Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
University of Pittsburgh

http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/festival

1:30 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Department of Anthropology, Center for Philosophy of Science, Department of Philosophy, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

This three-day symposium offers a synthetic analysis of race and racism around the themes of embodied practices and habits. The symposium will involve both working papers and three public plenary talks. While implicit bias is regularly defined as an unconscious or involuntary behavior, some researchers are utilizing the language of "habit" in order to explain the development and practice of automatic racist stereotyping and discriminatory actions. This turn to the importance of habit and embodiment has recently garnered broad support from both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.

4:00 pm Symposium
"The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodiment, Habitus, and Implicit Bias" Symposium
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning (Humanities Center)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with The Year of Healthy U, Dietrich Faculty Research and Scholarship Program, University Research Council, Department of Religious Studies, World History Center, Africana Studies Department, Department of Anthropology, Department of Philosophy, Center for Philosophy of Science, Office of Health Sciences Diversity, Duquesne University Philosophy Department and Simon Silverman Center (Duquesne University)
See Details

Dr. Celine Leboeuf [Florida International University], “Reforming Racializing Bodily Habits: Mindfulness Meditation as an Intervention”
Dr. David Mills [Champlain College], “You Must Change Your Life: Sloterdijk, Religion, and Race”

8:00 pm Performance
University Gamelan 20th Anniversary Concert
Location:
Bellefield Hall Auditorium
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Department of Music
See Details

For 20 years, the University Gamelan has given audiences the opportunity to immerse themselves in the rich sounds of Indonesian Gamelan. Come celebrate with Pitt students, faculty, and special guest artists.

Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $8.50; non-Pitt students and seniors are $5. At the door: general admission is $12; non-Pitt students and seniors are $8. Pitt students: free with valid ID.