Week of October 7, 2018 in UCIS

Monday, October 8

12:00 pm Lecture
Applied Demonstrations of Energy Infrastructure Development
Location:
102 Benedum Hall
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

This lecture is presented by Bo Riisgaard Pedersen, Special Advisor, Danish Energy Agency - part of the Danish Ministry of Energy, Utilities and Climate. This is the October speaker for the Center for Energy's lecture series.

2:00 pm Presentation
Job Vacancies and Immigration: Evidence from Pre- and Post-Mariel Miami
Location:
4716 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Economics
See Details

George Borjas will present his recent work on the effects of immigration on labor market opportunities revisiting the Mariel Boatlift episodes with a unique data set on monthly job vacancies.

4:30 pm Lecture
Holocaust Research and Contemporary Politics: A Battlefield of History and Memory
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall (History Department Lounge)
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies on behalf of Department of History and Jewish Studies Program
See Details

The Department of History and the Jewish Studies Program present: Dan Michman, head of the International Institute for Holocaust Research and Incumbent of the John Najmann Chair of Holocaust Studies. He is also Emeritus Professor of Modern Jewish History, Chair of the Arnold and Leona Finkler Institute of Holocaust Research and Incumbent of the Abraham and Edita Spiegel Family Chair in Holocaust Research at Bar-Ilan University.

Tuesday, October 9

12:30 pm Lecture
Driverless Cars & Ancient Roman Torts
Location:
Barco Law Building Room 113
Sponsored by:
European Union Studies Association along with University of Pittsburgh School of Law and Center for International Legal Education
See Details

Prof. Marco Gardini presents, “Driverless Cars and Ancient Roman Torts: Alfenus’ Mule and the Moral Machine.” Marco Gardini is an Adjunct Professor of Roman Law at the University of Parma (Italy). He received his law degree from the University of Parma (Italy) in 1994, and received his LL.M. degree from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in 1997. From 1998 to 2001 he worked at the research project THEMIS on Artificial Intelligence and Law. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law during fall 2018, teaching the course "Comparative Legal Cultures," and was previously a Visiting Professor at Pitt Law in 2008. His general research interests include legal theory and artificial intelligence and law.

4:30 pm Lecture
China Town Hall: Martin Chorzempa and Webcast with Condoleezza Rice
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with National Committee on US China Relations
See Details

China Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving 70 cities throughout the United States. This year's event will feature a local guest speaker at 4:30 pm. We have invited Martin Chorzempa who is a research fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics who will talk about China's social credit system followed by a live national webcast with Dr. Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor.

6:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Digital Portfolio Information Sessions
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

The portfolio is an integrated element of the certificate experience. Students should begin their portfolio soon after enrollment in the Global Studies certificate program. GSC in collaboration with other UCIS centers will hold three workshop sessions to help with aligning expectations and offering specific tips on how to traverse Wordpress to create a tailored portfolio. Mark your calendar for the following dates:
9/17/18, 6 pm, 4130 WWPH
10/9/18, 6 pm, 4217 WWPH
11/7/18, 6 pm, 4217 WWPH

Wednesday, October 10

12:00 pm Lecture
Red Children’s Republics: Socialist Internationalism and Transnational Youth Exchanges During the Late Cold War
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Children’s Literature and Cultural Studies Program
See Details

The talk examines the widespread practice of youth exchanges during the late Cold War through two seemingly peripheral actors: the Romanian Pioneers, the children’s organization of the Romanian Communist Party, and one of its most active partners in the west, the International Falcons Movement, a leftwing youth organization with national branches in Germany, Austria, the United Kingdom, and France. Following Romanian and foreign teens who traveled as cultural ambassadors to youth camps organized in the Soviet bloc and Western Europe, the talk examines competing visions and practices of socialist internationalism in order to illuminate the role of “soft power” during the Cold War.

4:30 pm Presentation
The Geography of German Prisoner of War Camps in the Soviet Union
Location:
6142 Scott Hall, Carnegie Mellon University
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Union Studies Association on behalf of Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

The paper examines German prisoner of war (POW) camps in the Soviet Union from 1941-1956. The Germans were the largest and longest held group of POWs of any of the victor nations of the Second World War. The key research question is why were they held for so long? The paper argues that the POWs were primarily held for economic reasons related to the mass destruction of the war. To support this argument, the paper heavily relies on GIS mapping of the POW camp locations in relation to Soviet infrastructure and environmental resources. The paper provides a detailed methodological breakdown of the mapping process in addition to analysis of the maps.

Susan Grunewald (CMU, Doctoral Student in History), with a response from John Walsh (French and Italian)

4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Varying Expressions of Negritude Throughout the U.S. and Latin America
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Join Panoramas in a discussion about Varying Expressions of Negritude Throughout the U.S. & Latin America

Wednesday, October 10th
4217 Posvar Hall
4:30 PM

Pizza provided! Free & open to the public!

Panoramas provides a web-based venue for thoughtful dialogue of Latin American and Caribbean issues. By enabling a voice for scholars, students, policy makers and others to engage in constructive commentary on relevant current and historical topics, the forum also serves as an academic resource to worldwide educational audiences. Housed at the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, and maintained by CLAS faculty, students and alumni, Panoramas strives to be at the forefront of scholarly analysis of affairs in the Latin American region.

For more information and to join the conversation, visit:
https://www.panoramas.pitt.edu/

4:30 pm Lecture
Red China's Green Revolution: Development and Productivity Growth Under China's Collectives
Location:
3703 Posvar, History Lounge
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with History Department
See Details

Joshua Eisenman’s (马佳士) research focuses on the political economy of China's development and its foreign relations with the United States and the developing world—particularly Africa. His work has been published in top academic journals including World Development, Development and Change, Journal of Contemporary China and Cold War History, and in popular outlets such as Foreign Affairs, The Wall Street Journal and Foreign Policy. His views have been cited in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist and The New Republic.

Professor Eisenman's newest book, "Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development Under the Commune" (Columbia University Press, 2018), explains how more capital investment and better farming techniques increased agricultural productivity growth in Maoist China. In "China Steps Out: Beijing’s Major Power Engagement with the Developing World" (Routledge, 2018), he worked with Eric Heginbotham to analyze China’s policies toward the developing world. His second book, "China and Africa: A Century of Engagement" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012), co-authored with David Shinn, was named one of the top three books about Africa by Foreign Affairs. Their next volume, under advance contract with the University of Pennsylvania Press, will examine the China-Africa political and security relationship.

4:30 pm Information Session
Faculty Book Talk
Location:
Thornburgh Room, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
International Week
See Details

A distinguished Argentine poet and essayist and one of the finest writers of short stories in world letters, Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) deliberately and regularly altered his work by extensive revision. In this volume, renowned Borges scholar Daniel Balderston undertakes to piece together Borges’s creative process through the marks he left on paper.

Friday, October 12

3:00 pm Colloquium
Going Viral
Location:
Anthropology Lounge (3106 WWPH)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Jessica Dimka Visiting Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh
Infectious diseases play an important role in human populations, influencing and being influenced by biological, social and ecological variables from the individual to the global level. Therefore, historical and current epidemics are relevant to all subfields of anthropology, while anthropological perspectives and methods that reveal important contextual factors are vital for effective public health responses. I will illustrate these points with my research exploring the 1918 influenza pandemic (the “Spanish flu”) in a small community in Newfoundland and Labrador. Using ethnographic, historical and archival data to construct an agent-based computer simulation model, I tested hypotheses about how local patterns of social organization may have influenced epidemic outcomes. For example, reduction in school attendance when older children assumed adult roles resulted in significant differences in epidemic size and timing. I will conclude the talk with a preliminary discussion of my new project which will use high-quality Norwegian records to investigate disability as a risk factor during the 1918 pandemic.

4:00 pm Film
Detroit's Rivera: The Labors of Public Art
Location:
Humanities Center
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Humanities Center, University of Pittsburgh Film and Media Studies Program, Cultural Studies Program and Dean of Undergraduate Studies
See Details

The Dept. of Hispanic Languages and Literatures invites you to a Public Film Screening and Q&A Session for:
Detroit's Rivera- The Labors of Public Art (2017) dir. Julio Ramos

Julio Ramos presenta su documental (ganador de varios premios internacionales en las Américas, el Caribe y Europa). Esto Será pronto, el viernes 12 de octubre en el Humanities Center a las cuatro. La presentación está abierta al público en general y será en inglés. Preguntas e intercambio en español e inglés.

Free & open to the public -- in English; questions in both Spanish and English!

October 12, from 4 - 6 p.m. @ the Humanities Center

Sponsors: Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures, Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS), Humanities Center, Film and Media Studies, Cultural Studies Program, and Dean of Undergraduate Studies

Saturday, October 13

1:00 pm Cultural Event
UCIS 50th Anniversary Celebration
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 1st Floor Commons
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, Nationality Rooms and Intercultural Exchange Programs, Office of International Services, Global Experiences Office and International Week
See Details

In 1968, the University Center for International Studies (UCIS) was created as the University of Pittsburgh’s encompassing framework for all its multidisciplinary international programs. To commemorate our 50th anniversary, we will be holding a celebration open to both the University and larger Pittsburgh community.

Join us for an afternoon of international performances, sweet treats from around the globe, children’s activities, and more!