Week of October 21, 2018 in UCIS

Sunday, October 21

1:00 pm Film
Pitt-Stop
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Cloister & Theater
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Come attend a captivating screening of three short firms that poignantly and candidly depict modern Asian family life!
The lens through which each of use sees "family" is unique to our own personal experiences and is strongly influenced by the cultures in which we live.
After the screening, Meghan Hynson from the Department of Music will do a hands-on demonstration and talk on the indonesian angling, a small portable bamboo rattle that is pitched to the Western scale and played by shaking.

Monday, October 22

3:30 pm Panel Discussion
Black Women and the Struggle
Location:
Posvar Hall 4217
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of Africana Studies
See Details

Throughout France and the French colonies, black women have made powerful contributions to the struggle for equality and decolonization. The ESC invites students to join our panelists for a discussion surrounding black

Panelists:
Felix Germain, Department of Africana Studies
Silyane Larcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Moderator: Jeanette Jouili, Department of Religious Studies

5:00 pm Information Session
Global Studies Undergraduate Student Meeting
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

A required informational meeting for all undergraduate students enrolled in GSC. Information presented will include opportunities about pop-up courses, careers and important dates, student clubs, and more. After the brief presentation, stick around for a student meet and greet and enjoy some tasty snacks. Special prizes awarded too!

Tuesday, October 23

12:00 pm Performance
Sing to Me About Love... and Other Tortures
Location:
O'Hara Student Center Dining Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Pitt University Honors College and Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures
See Details

Sing to Me About Love... and Other Tortures
A Monologue in Spanish by Jacqueline Briceño

October 23, 2018
Performance and Q&A
12:00 - 2:30 p.m.
O'Hara Student Center Dining Room

For more information, contact David Tenorio, Ph.D. at dtenorio@pitt.edu

The obsession of a teenager to compose an operatic aria about love and the meaning of pain throws her into unveiling the secrets of her grandmother, who is about to turn 100 years old, and of her mother, who is torn between divorce and suicide. Three generations of women whose personal stories lead them to face estrangement, despair, and other generational struggles. Nothing more complicated for Martirio, the protagonist, than to flesh out the pain of her own loneliness. This is a subtle and delicate performance that adds doses of humor and innocence, culminating with the protagonist singing her opera repertoire while rediscovering her strength and passion.

4:00 pm Lecture
Authoritarian Governance of Uyghur Autonomous Region in China
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall Room 4130
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Center for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
See Details

Sarah Tynen: State Territorialization through Bureaucratic Control: Authoritarian Governance at the Neighborhood Level in China
Ph.D. Candidate • Graduate Part-time Instructor • Urbanization and Poitical Governance • MA 2014
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Areas of interest: State-society relations, development, migration and ethno-cultural nationalism in China's autonomous regions and borderlands

By building on the concept of territory as a contested social relation that challenges the state-society dichotomy, this paper explores state territorialization practices as crucial components in shaping everyday life. In particular, it asks: How do citizens experience state bureaucratic power at the neighborhood level in their everyday lives? What is the role of community participation in garnering regime legitimacy? The research draws on 24 months of ethnographic and interview data in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China. The findings show that the conflict between state control and social membership revolves around the negotiation for territorial control, especially when it comes to struggle for power over minority bodies in nationalist space.

5:00 pm Lecture
JET Info Session
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
6:30 pm Film
CLAS Cinema Series: Eyes of the Journey
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Spanish Film Club
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies presents the CLAS Cinema Series Fall 2018:
September 11 ... The Future Perfect
October 2 ... On the Roof
October 23 ... Eyes of the Journey
November 6 ... Spider Thieves
November 27 ... The Candidate
December 4 ... The Queen of Spain

Tuesdays at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
6:30 P.M. - Pizza
7:00 P.M. - Movie

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/
Free & Open to the Public!
English subtitles provided.

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies at Pitt, CLAS CINEMA Series, and Spanish Film Club by Pragda

For more information, visit: https://clascinema.weebly.com/

Wednesday, October 24

1:45 pm Lecture
The Australia-US Alliance in the 21st Century: An Australian Perspective
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of
See Details

The US-Australia alliance has been a significant pillar in Australian foreign policy since 1951. The Trump Administration has urged a renewed focus on this relationship but, as Dr. Aiden Warren, Senior Lecturer and Researcher in RMIT's School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, will illustrate, the alliance also faces increased debate pertaining to a security challenges in the Indo-Pacific region, and within the US about the costs of global leadership. Such debates also need to take into account the tensions that derive fro the US's relationship with China, the region's strongest power.

4:30 pm Lecture
The Geopolitics of Spectacle: Space, Synecdoche, and the New Capitals of Asia
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law School
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Urban Studies Program
See Details

Natalie Koch, Associate Professor of Geography, Syracuse University. Why do autocrats build spectacular new capital cities? Dr. Koch considers how autocratic rulers use "spectacular" projects to shape state-society relations, but rather than focus on the standard approach - on the project itself - she considers the unspectacular "others." The contrasting views of those from the poorest regions toward these new national capitals help her develop a geographic approach to spectacle. Join us for this upcoming book talk by the author, with a response from Mrinalini Rajagopala, Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture

5:00 pm Performance
Diamante Trio
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center

Thursday, October 25 until Sunday, October 28

(All day) Conference
19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh Press, Confucious Institute, World History Center, Year of PittGlobal, China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

CESS 2018 : October 24-28, 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh

The Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Graduate School for Public and International Affairs are pleased to host the 19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. Join over 300 scholars and professionals from around the globe for a conference, spanning five days of workshops, panels, forums, exhibits, and special events.

For more information about the program, see https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program.

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Thursday, October 25

12:00 pm Lecture
Mixing It: Multinational, Multi-ethnic Britain in the Second World War
Location:
3911 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with European Union (Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant)
See Details

Waves of refugees, exiles, troops, and war workers from overseas meant that the population of Britain reached unprecedented levels of diversity during WWII. Once the war was over, this multi-national, multi-ethnic wartime population often remained, but their history has been largely forgotten. As History Revealed commented: “Wendy Webster is on a mission to make us remember.”

Lunch will be provided; pre-registration required
Registration link: https://mixingit.eventbrite.com

12:30 pm Colloquium
Hollywood in the French Projects
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Humanites Center
See Details

Colloquium featuring David Pettersen (French and Film and Media Studies)

with responses from Adam Lowenstein (English and Film and Media Studies) and Jeanette Jouili (Religious Studies)

4:00 pm Reception
Faculty Salon
Location:
4100 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Join us for a happy hour in the Global Studies main office. We'll provide drinks and light refreshments; you provide the great company and conversation. Not only are these events fun, they help us to build up the Global Studies program and community at Pitt by giving us a chance to learn more about your work and how we might support it. It's a great way to meet people with shared or complementary interests, and for us to hear your suggestions about what we might do to enrich and encourage exciting research, teaching, and programs on campus and beyond. This event is for faculty only.

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Non-Alcoholic Mix off
Location:
Schenley Quad
Sponsored by:
International Week along with Resident Student Association
See Details

RSA's Non-Alcoholic Mix off (NAMO) is an event that occurs during National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week. Students compete by creating non-alcoholic drinks and decorating their table and having others vote on the best one! This years theme is Fire and Ice with a focus on culture and diversity on and off Pitts campus. Come join us on October 25th from 7-9 P.M. for fun information and free drinks!

Friday, October 26

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Bolsonaro and the Future of Brazilian Democracy
Location:
4801 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Political Science
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Political Science present

Bolsonaro and the Future of Brazilian Democracy
Featuring invited panelists: Barry Ames and Joao Guedes Neto

Friday, October 26th
12 p.m.
4801 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh

For more information: dms180@pitt.edu

Pizza provided! Free and open to the public!

3:00 pm Lecture
Mediating Voice, Sounding Politics: Āwāj as Metaphor and Material
Location:
3106 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Kunreuther will discuss the South Asian term ‘āwāj’ as a vernacular alternative to global discourses of ‘voice’. While global discourses of voice (in English) rarely turn our attention to the soundings of democracy, the term ‘āwāj’, used in many South Asian languages, refers explicitly to sound and to metaphoric meanings of voice. At a metaphorical level largely developed through media, ‘āwāj’ resonates with modern, global discourses of voice used to describe interior thoughts and desires, political consciousness, agency, and modes of selfhood central to modern publics and democratic practice. Because sound affects us in ways that often exceed words, ‘āwāj’ helps us focus our attention on the connections between the rational and the affective, the articulate and the inarticulate, rather than their fundamental division, raising questions around how we think about democratic practice.

4:30 pm Lecture
The Power of Evidence-Based Research in Policy-Making: Lessons from Afghanistan
Location:
David Lawrence Hall 121
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), School of Education, World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

Conference registration required (https://www.cess.pitt.edu/registration).

Dr. Orzala Nemat is an internationally known Afghan scholar and a life time activist recognized for being an expert in political ethnography. Her research focuses on the political economy of governance interventions in conflict affected settings highlighting local governance relations in Afghanistan’s villages resulting from the policies of transnational/international institutions and central government’s development and political interventions.

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
CERIS Meeting & Book Discussion
Location:
Seton Hill University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
6:30 pm Performance
Chhandayan Concert
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Vocal: Manasi Majumder
Sarod: Tejendra N. Majumder
Tabla: Samir Chatterjee
Harmonium: Neelesh Nadkarni
This concert is co-sponsored by Music Department and Asian Studies Center

For more Tickets & info: 412-580-1023/ 908-892-9215/ 646-281-4062 / info@tabla.org
Ticket online: https://tabla.org/calendar/ 2018/10/26

7:00 pm Cultural Event
Palenque!
Location:
Kelly Strayhorn Theater
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Dance at Slippery Rock University, Frederick Douglass Institute at Slippery Rock University and Latin American Cultural Union
See Details

Bésame is partnering with Melissa Teodoro, professor of dance at Slippery Rock University. This is an original production featuring the music, dance, poetry, and culture of the Colombian Atlantic Coast. This is an original production featuring the music, dance, poetry, and culture of the Colombian Atlantic Coast.

October 26 at Kelly Strayhorn Theater
7 - 9 PM
5941 Penn Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206

https://www.facebook.com/events/296907681087739/

$15 General admission
$10 Students -- cash at the door

7:00 pm Reception
CESS Welcome Reception
Location:
Posvar Hall Galleria
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press, School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

Featuring music by Dutar Odeyev

MUST BE REGISTERED FOR THE CESS CONFERENCE TO ATTEND (https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program).

Saturday, October 27

12:00 pm Festival
SAMHAIN-Gaelic Halloween Festival
Location:
Commons Room - Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms and Intercultural Exchange Programs
See Details

Samhain (pronouced "Sah-win") is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. Traditionally, it is celebrated from October 31 to November 1, as the Celtic day began and ended at sunset. It was a night when spirits could cross over, and later replaced with the Christian celebration All Sant's Day on November 1 (thus, October 31 was "All Hallows [Saints] Eve")

Samhain celebration of storytelling & turnip carving!!

12:45 pm Panel Discussion
Majlis Podcast: Central Asia in Current Affairs
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), The World History Center, the University of Pittsburgh Press, and the School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

The Majlis Podcast is Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty's in-depth weekly current affairs talk show focusing on Central Asia.

Hosted and produced by Muhammad Tahir, RFE/RL's Media Relations Manager, every week the podcast brings the most relevant experts to discuss the pressing issues of the day involving its target region.

As part of the Special Events Series of the 2018 conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society, RFE/RL will record an episode on a current affairs topic with discussants and a live audience.

Conference registration is NOT required.

4:15 pm Panel Discussion
Presidential Panel: Meet the Past, Present and Future Presidents of CESS
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Room 125
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), The World History Center, the University of Pittsburgh Press, and the School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

Must be registered for the CESS conference to attend (https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program).

7:30 pm Panel Discussion
Screening and Panel Discussion: Not in Our Name
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Confucius Institute along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), World History Center, University of Pittsburgh Press, School of Education and Central Eurasian Studies Society
See Details

An initiative of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Not in Our Name is the first documentary project ever produced on counter-extremism in Central Asia. With the goal of empowering communities to stand up to violent extremist recruiters who claim to represent them, the RFE/RL team traveled to diverse regions and explored how residents can work together from the local to the national level to prevent the spread of violence. Not in Our Name features video portraits of those who lost family members in Syria and Irak and follows discussions among youth from Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan as young people in these countries reflect on experiences from a nearby conflict in town hall meetings.

The challenge Central Asian communities face from extremist groups is real. According to recent estimates, countries of the former Soviet Union were the single largest source of foreign fighters in the Syria/Iraq conflict -- more than neighboring states in the Middle East. With over 4,200 Central Asians joining the conflict, communities across the region have been and will continue to be exposed to the horrors of war and extremist ideological tendencies. The documentary follows Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tajik, and Uzbek youth as they come to a deeper understanding of the challenges they face and consider what their options for collective action so that their communities can take a stand and declare "Not in Our Name."

This event is part of the Special Events Series of the 2018 Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with contributors. Conference registration is NOT required.

Moderator: Muhammad Tahir, Media Relations Manager, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty