Week of October 28, 2018 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Sunday, October 28

(All day) Conference
19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh Press, Confucious Institute, World History Center, Year of PittGlobal, China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and Central Eurasian Studies Society
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CESS 2018 : October 24-28, 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh

The Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Graduate School for Public and International Affairs are pleased to host the 19th Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society. Join over 300 scholars and professionals from around the globe for a conference, spanning five days of workshops, panels, forums, exhibits, and special events.

For more information about the program, see https://www.cess.pitt.edu/program.

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
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Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Tuesday, October 30

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
RMU Global Dialogue
Location:
Robert Morris University, Center for Global Engagement
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Robert Morris University
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A round table discussion on access to education in Africa. The panelists will use case studies (Nigeria, Ethiopia and Kenya) in conversations about gender equity in education.

Panelists:
Dr. Soji Oni: Factors Hindering Women’s Aspiration for Tertiary Education in South-West Nigeria

Anna-Maria Karnes: Women and higher education in Ethiopia

Macrina C. Lelei: Challenges girls and women face in accessing education in Kenya

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Panel Discussion on Energy Policy
Location:
Posvar 4217
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany;
See Details

What is the Energiewende? Why is Germany heavily investing in renewable sources of power?
Is it politically controversial?
Dr. Jorg Radte of the University of Siegen and Dr. Nikolas Wolfing of the Centre for European Economic Research will answer your questions about German energy policies in this virtual panel.

12:00 pm Panel Discussion
Family Separation in the Trump Era: Puerto Ricans and Central Americans
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Global Studies Center along with Immigration Law Clinic at Pitt Law and Panoramas (CLAS)
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Join us for a round table discussion, "Family Separation in the Trump Era: Puerto Ricans and Central Americans"

Invited speaker include:
Dr. Iris Camacho Melendez, a Family Law professor at the Interamerican University School of Law, Puerto Rico.
Dr. Sheila I. Vélez Martínez, the Jack and Lovell Olender Professor of Asylum Refugee and Immigration Law, University of Pittsburgh.
Dr. Orlando G. Portela, an Adjunct Professor of Law, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and affiliated attorney with Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Pittsburgh.

Sponsored by The Center for Latin American Studies, Immigration Law Clinic at Pitt Law, Global Studies Center and Panoramas at the University of Pittsburgh.

Free and open to the public!

For more information: dms180@pitt.edu
https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list

5:00 pm Lecture
Cherry Blossoms, Traditions, Symbols, and Stories
Location:
540 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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Author Ann McClellan will explore the images and tales associated with the ethereal Japanese cherry blossoms. People have celebrated the blooming of these trees for more than 1000 years, and today they serve as instruments of diplomacy, as landscape enhancements, and as eternal signs of spring and romance.

Ann McClellan is the author of two definitive books about the Japanese cherry blossoms including the official book of the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, DC.

Wednesday, October 31

4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Hot Topics/Global Perspectives
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Thursday, November 1

12:00 pm Film
Children 404, dir. Pavel Loparev and Askold Kurov
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Children’s Literature and Cultural Studies Program
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In response to Russian leader Vladimir Putin’s 2013 outlawing of “gay propaganda,” activist Elena Klimova created Children 404, an online forum for Russian-speaking LGBTQ teens.

4:30 pm Lecture
The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State
Location:
5201 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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John Torpey will be discussing the new edition of his book The Invention of the Passport. Dr. Torpey is Professor
of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, CUNY.

5:00 pm Lecture
Historical Memory in Spain and Other Iberianist Challenges
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
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Sebastiaan Faber presents a lecture centered on the continuing public debates in Spain over the legacy of the Civil War and Francoism, which have posed a series of challenges related to questions of disciplinarity, audience, and commitment.

5:30 pm Lecture
South Asia Speaker Series - Congress of Kings: Notes on a Painting Showing a Mughal Ruler Having Sex
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
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As part of our Year 3 Speaker Series of our South Asia Initiative, Dr. Kavita Singh, Professor of Art History and Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics Jawaharlal Nehru University will be speaking on the Congress of Kings: Notes on a Painting Showing a Mughal Ruler Having Sex.

Muhammad Shah Rangila, lord of a dwindling Mughal empire from 1719-1748, is remembered for his political incompetence as well as his great appetite for pleasure. Bolstering this reputation is a famous painting that shows him in sexual congress with an as yet unidentified woman. Although it appears at first as the record of an intimate moment, scholars have noted the stately symmetry of the image, the presence of witnesses, the retention of symbols of power such as the halo, huqqa and sword. All of these imply that this was a ceremonial portrait, more public than private in its intention. If this is so, by whom was this portrait meant to be seen, and what was it meant to show? How does this image intersect with earlier traditions of Mughal portraiture, and with earlier, public signs of the emperors' affections? Is this frank depiction of the Mughal emperor at all related to the pervasive interest in love and sexual love seen in Indic literary and visual arts? This lecture speculates on the possible meanings of this painting by placing it in the context of the emperor’s own biography as well as traditions of portraiture, music, poetry and medical and erotological literature circulating in Muhammad Shah’s time.

Bio of Speaker:
Kavita Singh is Professor of Art History and is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she teaches courses on the history of Indian painting and the history and politics of museums. She has published essays on issues of colonial history, repatriation, secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialisation of difficult histories as they relate to museums in India and beyond. She has also published essays on aspects of Mughal painting.

6:00 pm Film
Power to Change
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, G8
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany;
See Details

Carl-A. Fechner's 2016 documentary uses Germany as a case study to offer a forward thinking vision of a sustainable, democratic, green future.

6:30 pm Cultural Event
Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
Location:
Carnegie Music Hall & Hall of Sculpture
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Carnegie Museum of Art
See Details

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
Thursday, November 1, 6:30-10:00 pm, Meet at GSC at 6:15 pm and walk over to the Carnegie.
To reserve a spot: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd-6Q5VK30x_iTLkOgDNgKLZPJdxUrh...
Come for the lecture and stay as long as your schedule permits.

Join GSC for artist presentation, performance and more.
Artists Cristóbal Martínez and Kade Twist of Postcommodity will lead the evening with a discussion about their diverse practice. Their art has bridged the US-Mexico border, and projected sound into Aristotle's Lyceum. Through an indigenous lens, the collective's distinctive practice brings history and social discourse to bear on complex issues. The work of art that they have created for the Carnegie International embodies Pittsburgh's industrial history in steel, glass, and coal. Hear Martínez and Twist speak about the complexities of creating visual language and narrative around issues that challenge us today.

Meet at GSC at 6:15 p.m., 4101 Posvar Hall
Artist Talk: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Music Hall
Performance: 8-8:30 p.m., Hall of Sculpture
Activities and galleries open until 10 p.m.

Friday, November 2

11:00 am Panel Discussion
Erwin Panofsky in Translation
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture, Department of Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Department of Jewish Studies and Humanities Center
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Speakers: Sonja Drimmer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Josh Ellenbogen (University of Pittsburgh), Jacqueline Jung (Yale University), and Karl Whittington (The Ohio State University). Organizer: Shirin Fozi (University of Pittsburgh).

Fifty years after his passing, Erwin Panofsky (1892-1968) remains one of the most widely read art historians of the past century, and perhaps the single most influential figure in establishing (in his own phrase) "the history of art as a humanistic discipline." He also belongs to a generation of German Jewish scholars who began their careers in their native country but were displaced by World War II, and eventually came to North America where they had a profound impact on Anglophone scholarship. In Panofsky's case this has led to an odd but powerful historiographic divide: his early work, published in German, is still widely read in Europe but scarcely known in the United States -- especially compared to his later, widely renowned English-language publications.

This colloquium seeks to address that gap by bringing together a small, focused group of scholars to address Panofsky's early work in a set of new, unpublished translations. Participants will read pre-circulated English versions of three texts: "The Problem of Style" (1915), German Sculpture of the Eleventh through Thirteenth Centuries (1924), and "Imago Pietatis" (1927). The colloquium will be an opportunity to discuss the essays, consider their position in the humanities today, and also reflect on the process of translation as a means of increasing access to a pivotal era of transatlantic scholarly exchange.

Interested participants must RSVP to Karoline Swiontek (karoline@pitt.edu) no later than Friday, October 26. Participation is open to all, but space is limited and RSVPs are required in order to receive access to the pre-circulated texts. Coffee and a light lunch will be served.

2:00 pm Lecture
Year of Pitt Global Featured Speaker: Jon McCourt, civil rights and community activist
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, G24
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Year of Pitt Global and Department of History
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Jon McCourt has been a community peace activist and member of the Peace and Reconciliation Group in Derry, Northern Ireland, for more than 30 years. He played a major role in the development of the Community Awareness Training Programme and founded and established the first Victim Support Service in Northern Ireland in 1986. He has also worked with those involved in conflicts around the world, including Bosnia, the Middle East, Rwanda, and Colombia.

Join the Year of Pitt Global, the European Studies Center, and the Department of History for this Signature Event as we hear from Jon on his experience with conflict and peacemaking around the world.

Jon will answer questions following his talk!

Friday, November 2 until Sunday, November 4

5:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Global Health Mini Course
Location:
2400 Sennott Square
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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Global Health: Health and Well Being:PS 1903/29734
This course will examine food insecurity and malnutrition as a part of a larger discussion on how to ensure healthy lives and well-being for all ages. Sustainable Development goals 2 and 3 will be the primary focus of the course.The course is for 1 credit and will run Friday November 2- Sunday November 4 2018

Friday, November 2 until Saturday, November 3

5:30 pm Symposium
2018 Graduate Symposium
Location:
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater / Humanities Center room 602, the Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture
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Motivating Monuments:
Defining Collective Identities in Public Spaces

A symposium hosted by the graduate students of the history of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Pittsburgh will be held November 2-3, 2018. Dr. Jacqueline Jung will serve as the symposium's keynote speaker.

The goal of this conference is to promote interdisciplinary discussions about the power invested in monuments and how individual attachments to them are persistently and profoundly mediated by shared group identities. This symposium takes objects as concrete manifestation of collective identities and will foster productive, in-depth discussions about the shared stakes of monuments. Conversations will unfold across premodern, early modern, modern, and contemporary topics, thematically linking research that might otherwise be isolated by disciplinary or historical divides.

Saturday, November 3

7:00 pm Festival
2018 Korean Music Festival
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Nationality Rooms along with Intercultural Exchange Programs
See Details

Reception to Follow