Week of February 10, 2019 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Monday, February 11

(All day) Symposium
First Annual Center for Latin American Studies Undergraduate Symposium
Location:
4130 and 4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

The Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh is calling for undergraduate students to submit papers for our upcoming symposium to be held on February 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.—Room 4130 and 4127 Wesley W. Posvar Hall.

This symposium provides a platform for students to showcase their research, papers and an opportunity to see what other undergraduate students at Pitt are working on areas related to Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States.

The Center is accepting papers across all disciplines, that showcase our region, such as but not limited to: Economic development, inequality and social inclusion, democracy, human rights, health, education, LGBTQ and gender studies, ethnicity, race studies, ecocriticism, urban development, violence and crime, social movements and political parties, technological innovation, political behavior, Latinx politics, and elites, will be accepted. If you have a topic that is not listed, please let us know.

Papers should be 10 pages and be double-spaced, with citations of at least four to five resources (MLA or APA format). Students will be limited to 15 minutes to present.

Call for papers due: January 10, 2020

Papers accepted will be announced on January 24, 2020

For questions or inquires, email: lavst12@pitt.edu

Tuesday, February 12

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe: 40 Years of Democracy in Spain (in Spanish)
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
See Details

Featuring Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez, University of Pittsburgh
Carolyn Dudek, Hofstra University
Robert Fishman, Carlos II University (Madrid)

With Moderator Diego Holstein, University of Pittsburgh

Remote audience participation is welcome through videoconferencing on a personal computer/device.
Contact IRM24@pitt.edu to participate.

4:00 pm Workshop
Undergraduate Workshop: Film and TV Titling
Location:
5404 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Classics, Department of French & Italian and Humanities Center Faculty Research Scholarship Program
See Details

This hands on workshop aims at introducing subtitling in practical terms, to stimulate awareness and interest in an ever-growing translation activity.

Wednesday, February 13

12:00 pm Lecture
Racial Antisemitism and Inquisition in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain
Location:
1502 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and European Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian, Department of History, Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and Department of Religious Studies
12:00 pm Lecture
Filming Horror in Northern Ireland
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with University of Pittsburgh Film and Media Studies Program, Department of English, Humanities Center and Cultural Studies Program
4:30 pm Panel Discussion
Advancing Health Equity and the Human Right to Health: Social Policy Perspectives on Public Health
Location:
Thornburgh Room, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of Africana Studies; Department of English; Department of Political Science; Department of Sociology; University Library System; Student Government Board
See Details

At its 2018 annual meeting, the American Public Health Association adopted 12 new policy statements on the most pressing public health concerns. The statements relate to hold mortality, environmental health, gun violence, refugees, police violence, and food security-- all areas in which we find significant racial disparities. This panel features Dr. Tiffany Gary-Webb, Associate Professor in Pitt's Graduate School of Public Health, and other experts exploring the implications of this effort of health professionals to confront inequality and racism and its health impacts. Panelists will consider the role of scholars and practitioners in advancing health equity in these areas as well as the wider lessons for advancing human rights today.

For a full schedule of Ferguson Voices events visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/ferguson-voices-0

7:00 pm Film
The Devil's Doorway Screening
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with University of Pittsburgh Film and Media Studies Program, Department of English, Humanities Center and Cultural Studies Program
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Followed by Q&A with Director Aislinn Clarke

Thursday, February 14

12:00 pm Presentation
Critical Research on Africa Series: Beyond Survival: The Hidden Peoples of Uganda - A Research Update
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
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Hidden Peoples are those persons relegated to the fringes of society on account of their race, religion, social, political or other characteristics, including mental and physical disabilities. In Uganda, our focus is on 4 groups of Hidden Peoples:

(1) persons with disabilities (2) sexual and gender based violence (3) acid attacks (4) war & conflict related survivors

Presenter: Paige Alderson is in her final year as a joint degree student at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law & GSPIA, majoring in International & Comparative Law and Human Security. In addition to her work as an African Studies Fellow, she is the co-coordinator of the Hidden Peoples Project and chief author of the book to be produced by the project.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Putting the Platforms in Their Place?
Location:
Law School Room 111
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education and Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security
See Details

The EU perspective on regulating online platforms in times of fake news, value gaps, and uberisation, featuring Dr. Folkert Wilman, member of the legal service of the European Commission. He is an EU Fellow in residence at the European Union Center of Excellence at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Friday, February 15 until Thursday, March 21

(All day) Exhibit
Africans in India Exhibition
Location:
University Art Gallery, Frick Fine Arts Building
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of the Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Over the centuries, East Africans have greatly distinguished themselves in India as generals, commanders, admirals, architects, prime ministers, and rulers. They have written a story unparalleled in the rest of the world: that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority.

Known as Habshis (Abyssinians) and Sidis, they have left an impressive historical and architectural legacy that attest to their determination, skills, and intellectual, cultural, military and political savvy.

This exhibition retraces—in over 100 photographic reproductions of paintings and contemporary photographs—the lives and achievements of a few of the many talented and prominent Sidis of yesterday.

The gallery at Frick Fine Arts is open on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with extended hours on Thursdays up to 7 p.m. It is closed on weekends.

Friday, February 15

4:00 pm Lecture
Gallery Talk: Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Asian Studies Center
See Details

Opening of the exhibition African in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers.  Curated by Kenneth X. Robbins, Omai H. Ali, Jazmin Graves .
4 pm: curator's and Scholars' Introduction
5-7 pm University Art Gallery doors open

5:00 pm Lecture
CERIS Spring 2019 Book Discussions for Educators
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center on behalf of REES
See Details

Please join us for dinner and what promises to be an informative read & book discussion on Islam After Communism by Adeeb Khalid.
James Pickett, Assistant Professor, History Department, University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the discussion.
Please register at: https://cerisnet.secure.pitt.edu/resource/faculty-readers-forum