Week of February 24, 2019 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, February 15 until Thursday, March 21

(All day) Exhibit
Africans in India Exhibition
Location:
University Art Gallery, Frick Fine Arts Building
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of the Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Over the centuries, East Africans have greatly distinguished themselves in India as generals, commanders, admirals, architects, prime ministers, and rulers. They have written a story unparalleled in the rest of the world: that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority.

Known as Habshis (Abyssinians) and Sidis, they have left an impressive historical and architectural legacy that attest to their determination, skills, and intellectual, cultural, military and political savvy.

This exhibition retraces—in over 100 photographic reproductions of paintings and contemporary photographs—the lives and achievements of a few of the many talented and prominent Sidis of yesterday.

The gallery at Frick Fine Arts is open on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with extended hours on Thursdays up to 7 p.m. It is closed on weekends.

Thursday, February 21 until Sunday, February 24

(All day) Conference
2019 International Model African Union Conference
Location:
Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies
See Details

The Model African Union is a simulation of the proceedings of the African Union, amplified by pre-conference study at home institutions and Embassy briefings in Washington, D.C. at Howard University in collaboration with the African Union Mission in Washington, D.C. and Member State Embassies sponsors this annual simulation of the African Union, the regional organization of African states, in the form of a Model African Union Conference. This is an opportunity for university and college students to study the role, structure, and activities of the African Union as well as the economic, social, and political-security issues facing African countries. Through simulation, students gain a better and clearer understanding of the capabilities and constraints that shape the policies of African Union member states in the arena of intra-African diplomacy on issues of mutual concern.

Sunday, February 24

12:00 pm Festival
East European Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Commons Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room
See Details

Join the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies for the annual East European Festival on Sunday, February 24, from noon until 4:00pm in the Cathedral of Learning. Enjoy regional cuisine, a Russian tea ceremony, and other entertainment. We’ll also have a table with activities for the kids. Thank you to our co-sponsors, including the Yugoslav Nationality Room, the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia, and our many student organizations.

Performances by Balkan Babes (12:00 pm) and GypsyStringz (2:00 pm)

Food by S&D Polish Deli and Salem's Market and Grill

Monday, February 25 until Sunday, March 10

(All day) Exhibit
Names instead of Numbers: Remembrance Book for the Prisoners of Dachau Concentration Camp
Location:
Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with German Department
See Details

This international traveling exhibit comes to the University of Pittsburgh for a limited time.
This world renowned exhibit features biographies of twenty-two former inmates of the camp in an attempt to "remember the people hidden behind the prisoner uniforms and victim statistics."

Monday, February 25

5:00 pm Information Session
Peace Corps Information Session
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter
See Details

Serving in the Peace Corps is a great way to immerse yourself in a new culture, learn a new language, and have the experience of a lifetime. Join us at this information session to learn about Volunteer experiences, ask questions about service, and gain tips to guide you through the application process.

Register to Attend: https://www.peacecorps.gov/events/19_vrs_peacecorpsweekgim_pitt_20190225/

6:30 pm Workshop
Hands-On Community Workshop with Poet/Artists Saretta Morgan and Bekezela Mguni
Location:
Digital Scholarship Commons, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for African American Poetry & Poetics, University Library System and The Black Unicorn Library and Archives Project

Tuesday, February 26

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Conversations on Europe: World's Fairs & International Expositions
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

As a part of the ESC’s Year of Global Europe, the ESC will devote this session of its virtual roundtable series to discussing the history of world’s fairs and international expositions. The first of these massive events began in Europe in the nineteenth century and became a way for European nations to showcase technology and their imperial power. In the last century, non-European nations became active participants and hosts. Our panel of experts will explore this change over time and discuss the role of world’s fairs and international expositions yesterday and today. Audience participation is encouraged. To participate remotely, contact irm24@pitt.edu

1:00 pm Workshop
Benshi Workshop
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
4:30 pm Cultural Event/Information Session
Less-Commonly-Taught-Languages Coffeehouse
Location:
William Pitt Union, Assembly Room
Announced by:
Center for African Studies, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, Director's Office and European Studies Center on behalf of Year of Pitt Global and Less-Commonly-Taught-Languages Center
See Details

Take a break from studying and enjoy kaffe and a kanelbullar in Swedish, njugu paak in Swahili, or gazoz in Turkish! Less-Commonly-Taught Languages Center will teach you how to place your order in Hindi, Quechua, Irish, Persian, Greece, Hungary, Haiti, Vietnam, or Ethiopia and more! You will have chance to place your order at the Coffeehouse and enjoy drinks and snacks from around the world.

Check out the event on Facebook!

4:30 pm Workshop
Hot Topics/Global Perspectives
Location:
Hillman Library ground floor (next to Cup and Chaucer)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

We supply the cookies, you supply the questions, insights, and perspectives on contemporary global issues. Join GSC for these informal monthly conversations about pressing contemporary issues. We begin with current events and seek to draw deeper connections and put these issues in transnational perspective. Student-focused, open to all.

5:30 pm Performance
Benshi Performance
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Japanese Silent Film Screening with Live Performance
Once known as “poets of the dark” benshi brought silent films to live through commentary and vocal performance, giving voice to the characters on screen. Perched on a podium beside the screen, benshi brought films to life. As many as 8000 benshi were performing across the country and the Japanese empire by the 1930s, and their popularity—and power—slowed the introduction of sound film in Japan.

Wednesday, February 27

12:00 pm Lecture
Pogroms, Blood Libels, and Other Forms of Antisemitism in Eastern and Central Europe
Location:
1502 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Department of History, Department of Religious Studies and Department of Jewish Studies
3:00 pm Lecture
What is Neoliberalism
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Andrea Micu received a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University in June 2018, MA in Performance Studies from Texas A&M, 2012 and BA in Communication Studies and Journalism from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid in 2008. Her teaching interests are in Urban Studies: urban anthropology, neoliberalism and urban geography; squatting and countercultural urban movements; arts development, Critical/cultural Studies; Aesthetics and politics, new materialisms; and Performance Studies: critical ethnography, performance and activism; political economies of performance. Her book project The Performance Commons: Squatting and Aesthetics in the Austere City theorizes the role of performance in contemporary housing activist movements in the South of Europe.

4:00 pm Information Session
MyPittGlobal How-To Session
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center
See Details

Have you been procrastinating about filling out your entry or exit surveys? Have you got questions about e-portfolios? Have you forgotten how to enter your coursework into MyPittGlobal?

If so, we can answer these and other questions about the MyPittGlobal platform at this event. Come meet UCIS advisors, student ambassadors, and others who will provide hands-on assistance to jumpstart your MyPittGlobal experience. Completing levels makes you eligible for potential study abroad scholarships, VIP access to mentorship and academic visitors. There will be a raffle for attendees--the more stations you visit, the more entries you get!

Pizza, cookies, and soft drinks will be provided.

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Panel
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter
See Details

Discover the benefits of Peace Corps service from returned Volunteers. Join us to learn about the challenging, rewarding and inspirational moments from a panel of returned Peace Corps Volunteers. Ask questions about service and gain tips to guide you through the application process.

Register to Attend: https://www.peacecorps.gov/events/19_vrs_peacecorpsweekpanel_pitt_20190227/

6:00 pm Workshop
Peace Corps Application Workshop
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter
See Details

Make your application stand out from the rest. Attend this workshop to learn how to browse Volunteer openings, find the right program, and strengthen your application. You will have an opportunity to ask questions about service, learn steps you can take to improve your chances, and gain valuable tips to guide you through the application process.

Register to Attend: https://www.peacecorps.gov/events/19_vrs_app_pitt_20190228/

8:00 pm Workshop
Ferguson Voices: Community Perspectives on Criminal Justice
Location:
Posvar Hall 4130
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of Africana Studies; Department of English; Department of Political Science; Department of Sociology; University Library System; Student Government Board
See Details

The Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame exhibit in Hillman Library brought individual testimony and portraits from Ferguson in 2016 to deepen conversations and understandings of criminal justice and activism. A guiding principle of the exhibit is to highlight stories of extraordinary actions by ordinary citizens in moments of crisis.

The Global Studies Center hopes to continue this community-based emphasis with an event for participants to discuss their individual perspectives, thoughts, emotions and reactions to criminal justice and policing in America.

This event will be based around three discussion circles led by moderators with different perspectives on criminal justice – Dr. Leah Jacobs of the School of Social Work, Commander Jason Lando of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, and Terrell Thomas of the ACLU. While the moderators are some of Pittsburgh’s leading experts on criminal justice, this event is about you – the participant – and the community-based discussions we hope to foster through this event.

Each group of participants will rotate through all three discussion circles so attendees can talk about each perspective before a final short discussion to unpack what everyone has learned and experienced together.

This event is open to all Pitt students and faculty but please come prepared to have civil and respectful dialogue about lived experiences and real consequences of the criminal justice system. While some discussions may be contentious, we must be respectful of one another to learn and discuss together.

Thursday, February 28 until Friday, March 1

(All day) Career Counselling
Career Toolkit Series: Student Career Networking Trip - Washington D.C.
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center
See Details

Global Studies is partnering with the African Studies Program and the Center for Russian and East European Studies to host the fourth annual career networking trip to Washington, D.C. Students meet with experts and alumni from government, non-profit, and for profit sectors to learn about career opportunities and challenges. Meetings will be organized by three themes:
* Diplomacy and Security
* Global Health
* Human Rights and Human Security

Thursday, February 28

12:00 pm Lecture
The Different Cultural Manifestations of Soccer in North America and Europe: The Centrality of Gender
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

In this talk, Prof. Markovits will present findings from his book Gaming the World: How Sports are Reshaping Global Politics and Culture (2010) and highlight the opposite paths that the women have traversed in the game of Association Football on both sides of the Atlantic.

3:00 pm Lecture
China's Rising Influence in Latin America and the Caribbean
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Center for Latin American Studies, Asian Studies Center, & University Center for International Studies at the University of Pittsburgh present...

TED PICCONE: China's Rising Influence in Latin America and the Caribbean

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28
3:00 PM
4130 POSVAR HALL, University of Pittsburgh

China is undertaking an ambitious strategy for economic and political engagement in Latin America and the Caribbean, raising a host of tough questions for policymakers in the region and the United States. Ted Piccone, Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution, will discuss the main features of China’s long game for influence in the region, its impact on democratic governance, and the U.S. response.

TED PICCONE is a Senior Fellow specializing in International Order and Strategy and Latin America at Foreign Policy at Brookings. His research focuses on global democracy and human rights policies; emerging powers; multilateral affairs; and U.S.- Latin American relations. In 2017-2018, he was the inaugural Brookings-Robert Bosch Siftung Transatlantic Initiative fellow in Berlin. Previously, he served as the Foreign Policy program’s acting vice president and deputy director. Piccone is the author or editor of multiple publications on international affairs, including his recent book on Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order. Piccone served eight years as a foreign policy advisor in the Clinton Administration at the National Security Council, the State Department’s Office of Policy Planning, and the Pentagon. He was also the Washington office director for the Club of Madrid and continues as an advisor. He holds degrees from Columbia University’s Law School and the University of Pennsylvania and teachers international human rights law at American Unviersity’s Washington College of Law.

Please join us for a stimulating discussion. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, please email asia@pitt.edu

https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/asc/home
https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/
https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/main/

4:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Patricia Ehrkamp, University of Kentucky Department of Geography
Presenting to University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Ehrkamp's research considers how immigration changes contemporary European and U.S. American cities and polities. She has argued that in order to understand immigrant geographies research needs to consider how immigrants and non-immigrant residents in cities of the United States and of Europe create spaces of everyday life, and how these new spaces of everyday life shape wider debates about citizenship, belonging, inclusion and exclusion. Her recent work on debates about minarets and mosque construction projects in Germany and Switzerland examines how understandings of secularism, religion, and gender shape contemporary liberal democracies in Europe.

6:00 pm Workshop
Peace Corps Application Workshop
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter
See Details

Make your application stand out from the rest. Attend this workshop to learn how to browse Volunteer openings, find the right program, and strengthen your application. You will have an opportunity to ask questions about service, learn steps you can take to improve your chances, and gain valuable tips to guide you through the application process.

Register to Attend: https://www.peacecorps.gov/events/19_vrs_app_pitt_20190228/

Friday, March 1 until Saturday, March 2

(All day) Conference
Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia 16th Annual Graduate Student Conference
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia and GPSG
See Details

The nations of the Eurasian landmass have been on both the receiving and giving ends of kinetic and non-kinetic coercion long before fear spread of Russian Twitter bots. Powers both great and small in Eurasia have for centuries attempted to exert control over their neighbors and lands further across the globe.The United States’ 2016 presidential election made information warfare and cyber-security the topics of conversation in academic, policy, and security circles. However, persuasion and coercion have taken many forms from multimedia propaganda campaigns, spy wars, military interventions, special operations raids, and even manipulation of the supply of critical resources such as fossil fuels. While we hear about these tactics being used abroad, the tactics of persuasion and coercion have also been employed domestically by Eurasian states.

Friday, March 1

6:00 pm Panel Discussion
North Korea in Transition Speaker Series Panel
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Year of Pitt Global and Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
See Details

The thaw in the US-North Korea relations last year, however uncertain, was certainly a welcome change from the previous year’s bellicose rhetoric, for both sides. Yet is change really around the corner? Doubts on Kim Jong Un’s sincerity persist. Many still believe he will never denuclearize and his gestures toward opening are just another ploy to buy time. Are we just seeing more of the same? Or do we have a historic opportunity to make real change on the peninsula? What are the issues at stake in 2019? “North Korea in Transition” in-vites distinguished experts in the fields of policymaking and international relations to probe those questions and put the current situation in a broader historical context. Reaching beyond politics, this speaker series also brings together scholars who have led academic and cultural engagements with North Korea to discuss how non-political exchanges can help improve North Korea’s relations with the rest of the world.

Moderator: Dr. James Cook, ASC, University of Pittsburgh
Panelists: Weston Konishi, Director of Partnerships & Development at US-Japan Council and Senior Fellow at Maureen & Mike Mansfield Foundation; William Brown, Professor at Georgetown University and Fellow at Korea Economic Institute of America; Lisa Collins, Fellow at Center for Strategic and International Studies

Saturday, March 2

8:30 am Workshop
Workshop on Human Rights and Genocide - Confronting Genocide: Never Again?
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

Participants will be introduced to the Choices Program's Human Rights and Genocide unit and will seek to understand the causes of genocide and why it persists and how people have grappled with many questions in response to genocide throughout history and today.
The workshop is open to educators teaching humanities, geography, history, government, current issues, civics, and other social studies in grades 7-12. Each participant will receive two curriculum units, lunch, Act 48 credit, and parking.
Registration Link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3Ks5jCqVhzSaiiG2cL34Ca_Yvgj4E...