Week of March 17, 2019 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, February 15 until Thursday, March 21

(All day) Exhibit
Africans in India Exhibition
Location:
University Art Gallery, Frick Fine Arts Building
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of the Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Over the centuries, East Africans have greatly distinguished themselves in India as generals, commanders, admirals, architects, prime ministers, and rulers. They have written a story unparalleled in the rest of the world: that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority.

Known as Habshis (Abyssinians) and Sidis, they have left an impressive historical and architectural legacy that attest to their determination, skills, and intellectual, cultural, military and political savvy.

This exhibition retraces—in over 100 photographic reproductions of paintings and contemporary photographs—the lives and achievements of a few of the many talented and prominent Sidis of yesterday.

The gallery at Frick Fine Arts is open on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with extended hours on Thursdays up to 7 p.m. It is closed on weekends.

Monday, March 18

10:00 am Lecture
"You Can't Forget Our Roots Anyway": French College Students' Views on a Multicultural France
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

France has a long and complicated history with its Muslim population, rooted in its colonial history and currently tied to dominant French discourse surrounding French Republican ideals, including secularism or laïcité. Tabachnick's thesis explores how have French college students, who have grown up in a time of de-facto racial and religious pluralism, been shaped by contemporary French discourses and understandings of laïcité?

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Migrations Initiative Brown Bag Series
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dr. Yolanda Covington-Ward will present on Mobility, Displacement, and Black Privilege in the Experiences of Liberian Migrants, Refugees, and Returnees

Brown Bag is a monthly seminar for faculty to learn about the research currently going on at Pitt in the area of migrations. Each month a faculty member will give a presentation about their ongoing research projects or an introduction to their research agendas. Students and faculty are encouraged to attend.

4:00 pm Lecture
Islamophobia and Antisemitism: Perspectives From Europe and the US
Location:
William Pitt Union Room 630
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Religious Studies, Nordenberg Scholars and and the Jewish Studies Program
See Details

This event is an open conversation with Paul A. Silverstein,Professor of Anthropology at Reed College and Jeanette Jouili, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Silverstein's current research focuses on the laboring and political experience of post-war North African immigrant coalminers as a a story of the fate of Europe"s cosmopolitan identity. Dr. Jouili's research and teaching interests include Islam in Europe, secularism, pluralism, popular culture, moral and aesthetic practices, and gender.

5:00 pm Reception
From Africans to India: Sidi Music from the Indian Ocean Diaspora
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Closing Reception for Africans in India: From Slaves to Rulers and Generals Exhibition
5:00-6:00 pm | University Art Gallery

Film Screening: From Africa to India: Sidi Music from the Indian Ocean Diaspora
and Q&A w/ director Amy Catlin-Jairazbhoy
6:00-8:00 pm | 125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

5:00 pm Panel Discussion
Cities on the Global Edge
Location:
Provost Suite, 2500 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and Global Studies Center
See Details

This special event led by Provost Cudd is a discussion about the many ways cities are being shaped by the forces of globalization.

This unique program will use Vice Provost Ariel Armony's new University of California Press book, The Global Edge: Miami in the Twenty-First Century, co-authored with Alejandro Portes, as a launching point to explore the social, economic, and cultural transformation of Miami and Pittsburgh – past and present.

Portes (Princeton University and University of Miami) will join in discussing issues of social justice, economic development, technology, migration, and the environment that arise from globalization as cities are built and rebuilt. The dialogue will allow for ample time for audience participation.

5:00 pm Program
6:15 Reception

6:15 pm Workshop
Russian Conversation Table
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Tuesday, March 19

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Faculty Networking Opportunity: The Global Salon
Location:
William Pitt Union, Lower Lounge
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Year of Pitt Global
See Details

All University of Pittsburgh faculty, tenure stream and non-tenure stream, are invited to a special series of networking opportunities made possible by the Year of Pitt Global. This Global Salon series brings together faculty and researchers from across the University to build relationships and share proposed or ongoing research. The Salons are organized around the UN's Sustainable Development Goals in five themes: People, Prosperity, Planet, Peace, and Partnership.

Goals for the Global Salon:

1. Increase local networks, build new relationships, form working groups

2. Encourage open dialogue across disciplines and develop common research agendas

3. Highlight efforts Pitt faculty undertake to address global issues

Additionally, Global Salon participants may be eligible for seed grant funding to advance multi-disciplinary research projects.

The Global Salons are free of charge, and lunch is provided, but registration is required. Register here: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6hZGlhwSyLx5DM1

Each Global Salon allows faculty to enjoy lunch while discussing their research informally through conversation groups. All faculty, regardless of full-time, part-time, or tenure status, are welcome to register.

Faculty Luncheon Series: The Global Salon

February 19 and 28, March 5 and 19, and April 9

Noon – 1:30 p.m.
William Pitt Union, Lower Lounge

PEOPLE
Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, to ensure that all human beings can fulfill their potential in dignity and equality and in healthy environments.

PROSPERITY
Thursday, February 28, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

PLANET
Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change to support present and future generations.

PEACE
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies to foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies that are free from fear and violence, and directed toward an understanding that no sustainable development can occur without peace and no peace can occur without sustainable development.

PARTNERSHIP
Tuesday, April 9, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies to mobilize and implement global partnerships for sustainable development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, and focused on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable.

12:30 pm Lecture
State owned enterprises in Latin America: old problems, new solutions
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Institute for Humane Studies
See Details

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019
12:30 p.m., 4130 Posvar Hall
The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Pittsburgh in collaboration with the Institute for Humane Studies Pre-Conference Lecture: “State owned enterprises in Latin America: old problems, new solutions.”

Aldo Musacchio
Associate Professor of Business in the International Business School (IBS) at the Brandeis University; Chair of the Undergraduate Business Program; Program Director of the Master’s in International Economics and Finance; and Director of the Brazil and Latin America Initiatives.

Thi is a pre-conference lecture as part of the Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference 2019, which will take place from March 29th - 30th. This talk was made possible through a partnership between Pitt's Center for Latin American Studies and the Institute for Humane Studies (www.theihs.org).

For more information about CLAS and the LASPP Conference, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
How to Write Hidden Histories of Migration with Bande Dessinee
Location:
CL501
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with University Honors College, Dean Twyning, Humanities Center, Department of French & Italian, Department of Africana Studies, Cultural Studies, Dept of Instruction and Learning, The World History Center, Office of the Associate Dean and Department of History of Art and Architecture
See Details

A part of the International Francophonie Day 2019!

1:30 pm Workshop
Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

5:00 pm Film
Short Film & Book Launch
Location:
Presentation Room, Alumni Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Film and Media Studies and Carnegie Mellon Center for the Arts in Society
See Details

The European Studies Center is pleased to invite all to attend a short film, Europe Endless, directed by Christopher Roth. It will be followed by a film discussion with Colin MacCabe, Jennifer Keating, and Richard Davies, moderated by Gayle Rogers. This event will also feature as the book launch for Patrick McCabe's Ireland: The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood.
Reserve your ticket at europeendless.eventbrite.com
The world premiere of Europe Endless will take place on Brexit Day, March 29th.

6:00 pm Lecture
Economic Human Rights: It's Time for a New Social Contract
Location:
Homewood Community Engagement Center, 622 N Homewood Ave
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Human Rights Working Group; Year of Pitt Global; Center for Health Equity, Ford Institute on Human Security and Pittsburgh United
See Details

The National Economic and Social Rights Initiative is advancing a nation-wide call for a “New Social Contract” in this country to defend our economy, democracy and climate from threats posed by extreme concentrations of wealth in a few hands and economic development that prioritizes economic growth over maintaining the infrastructure, goods and services that families and neighborhoods need to thrive. A New Social Contract flips the script on this abusive economy and advances comprehensive, transformative, community-led solutions that protect human rights, build equitable systems for everyone and deepen our democracy. Learn about this initiative and how it can connect with struggles for human rights, democracy, and racial and economic justice in our city!

Wednesday, March 20

11:30 am Panel Discussion/Reception
Our Place in Changing Cities:
Location:
University Club, Ballroom A
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and European Studies Center
See Details

Join us for a special event featuring University of Pittsburgh Chancellor Patrick Gallagher in conversation with the leader of Newcastle University (UK), Vice Chancellor Chris Day.

In a wide-ranging discussion moderated by Lina Dostilio, Pitt’s Assistant Vice Chancellor of Community Engagement, the two higher education leaders will discuss the role of their institutions in post-industrial cities as universities take on new responsibilities in the areas of social mobility, cultural wellbeing, innovation, and economic development.

A reception will be held beginning at 11:30 am., in advance of the 12 – 1:00 p.m. special program. Both events are open to the public and the entire Pitt community. Students, faculty, administrators, and the public are invited to engage in a dialogue with the panelists following the discussion.

Registration is not required.

Seating is limited.

12:00 pm Lecture
Nazi Antisemitism: Racial Theory, Bystandership, and Genocide
Location:
1502 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Jewish Studies, Department of Religious Studies and Department of History
12:00 pm Lecture
Redefining the American Social Contract: From Social Exclusion to Equity and Rights
Location:
109 Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Human Rights Working Group; Year of Pitt Global; Center for Health Equity and Pittsburgh United
See Details

As we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we face the realization that the human rights system is facing an existential crisis. Human rights are more important than ever and under great threat. But the human rights framework has historically avoided engaging with core economic and political systemic questions. Despite formal recognition of many human rights, hunger, housing instability, poor educational outcomes, lack of access to healthcare, abusive poverty jobs, state and private violence, and lack of access to clean water are all at epidemic proportions and dramatic racial disparities. Today it is core systemic questions—how capital and finance (and debt) are organized, what structural arrangements underlie our economy, our relationship to land and resources and more—that have become the focus of grassroots movements, especially those led by young people. These broader movements have embraced community driven solutions to our multiple crisis that arguably hold the key to deep systemic change. Can these solutions add up to a New Social Contract for America driven by human rights values? Will our movements usher in a new post-neoliberal era? And if so, what do human rights lessons of history have to say to guide us?

3:00 pm Film
The Silk Road on Screen: The Adopted Son
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Latin American Lecture Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

This film is an exquisitely composed and photographed child-to-man tale of a Kyrgyz villager. Beshkempir is just like any other kid- playing in the mud, getting into trouble, experiencing the first pangs of sexuality- until a fight with his best friend leads to the revelation that he was adopted.

Running Time: 81 minutes

Introduction by Ellina Sattarova, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
Public Interview with Jessica Oublie and Marie-Ange Rousseau
Location:
WPU Dining Room A
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with University Honors College, Dean Twyning, Humanities Center, Department of French & Italian, Department of Africana Studies, Dept of Instruction and Learning, World History Center, Office of the Associate Dean and Department of History of Art and Architecture
See Details

A part of the International Francophonie Day 2019!

Thursday, March 21 until Friday, March 22

(All day) Symposium
Eastern European, Balkan, and Middle Eastern Female Artists
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, Global Studies Center, Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Humanities Center, Film Studies Program, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Gender, Gender Sexuality & Women's Studies Program, Turkish Nationality Room, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and Film and Media Studies
See Details

Thursday, March 21

A temporary exhibit will be opened in the Cathedral Gallery, Alumni Hall

* 5:30-5:40pm: Opening remarks and an intro of the participants

* 5:40-6:10pm: A conversation with the three female artists and a poetry reading

* 6:10-7:50pm: A Belarusian film screening, Crystal Swan (2018)

* 8:00-9:00pm: Reception

Friday, March 22

* 9:30-10am: Breakfast

* 10:00-11:30am: A public roundtable on women artists in Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and the Middle East

* 11:30-11:40am: Closing remarks

Thursday, March 21

11:00 am Lecture
Laborer, Citizen and Neighbor: Comparing Subjectivity in Pittsburgh and Berlin
Location:
3307 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Fiona Eichinger (senior, Biological Sciences, BPHIL/IAS/global studies) will defend her thesis using comparative case studies of Bhutanese refugees in Pittsburgh and Syrian refugees in Berlin to illustrate how national responses to forced migration have differentially taken shape in light of global trends. This investigation prioritizes refugee voices to understand how national resettlement frameworks are structured to enforce expectations for a refugee's relation to the state (citizen figure), economy (laborer figure), and society (neighbor figure).

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Traveling for the State: Dunhuang Envoys on the Silk Road (850-1000)
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Thornburgh Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Presented by Xin Wen, Assistant Professor, East Asian Studies and History, Princeton University.

This event is a part of the Guest Speaker Series of Silk Roads Rising: Globalization and Exchange from the 10th Century to the Present

4:30 pm Workshop
Global Issues Through Literature: Instant City
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

This reading group for educators explores literary texts from a global perspective. Content specialists present the work and its context, and together we brainstorm innovative pedagogical practices for incorporating the text and its themes into the curriculum. Sessions usually take place in 4130 Posvar Hall (unless otherwise noted) from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Books, Act 48 credit, dinner, and parking are provided.

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screen: Border
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Partners
See Details

Tina is not an ordinary woman--both inside and out. With a bestial-looking face that provokes judgement from those around her and a mysterious scar on her tailbone, Tina has the ability to sense or smell how people feel. She is especially adept at detecting fear or unease, skills that make her an invaluable customs officer. When she catches a twitchy businessman carrying child pornography, law enforcement loops Tina and her unusual abilities into the investigation. On the job, she meets Vore, who shares her unusual physical traits and holds information that could alter Tina’s entire existence. Based on a short story by Swedish author John Ajvide Lindqvist (LET THE RIGHT ONE IN), the Academy Award nominated BORDER is an exciting, intelligent mix of romance, fantasy, Nordic noir, social realism, folk tales, and supernatural horror that defies and subverts gender and genre conventions. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/border.html.

Friday, March 22 until Saturday, March 23

(All day) Conference
Migrations of Culture
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Announced by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies on behalf of Modern Language Department
See Details

Share your research with other undergraduate students! Get real feedback on a paper! Gain conference experience for work or graduate school! Interested? Then send an abstract to a biannual undergraduate research conference hosted by the Modern Languages Departments at the University of Pittsburgh on March 2223, 2019. Abstracts should be sent to mecchia@pitt.edu by January 5, 2019.

The papers should address the concept of cultural migrations in the broadest sense of the term, that is, immigrations and emigrations in real and virtual spaces linked to the movements of people(s), language(s) and culture(s). We are looking for multiple disciplinary, geographic, and historical perspectives on the conflicts and opportunities created by the shifting flows of populations, languages and cultural traditions throughout the ages and in the contemporary world.

The language of the conference is English but we welcome papers addressing Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian languages and cultures.

Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Katelyn Knox, Asst. Professor of French at the University of Central Arkansas, author of Race on Display in 20th and 21st Century France (University of Liverpool Press, 2016).

Topics could include:
▪ Multilingual societies and their conflicts ("language wars") and advantages
▪ Linguistic landscapes and their evolution
▪ Translation as a political tool ▪ Literatures of the diaspora
▪ Circulation of texts through multiple areas and in multiple languages
▪ Travel literature through the ages
▪ Exiles, migrants, and refugees
▪ Processes of acculturation
▪ The politics of cultural production
▪ Films and the problems of cultural translation

Papers should be twenty minutes long. Papers will be selected by a selection committee staffed by undergraduates from the University of Pittsburgh. Students who submit abstracts will be notified about acceptance by January 20 2019. All inquiries can be directed to Prof. Giuseppina Mecchia, at mecchia@pitt.edu.

Limited travel subsidies will be available!

(All day) Symposium
International Symposium: Deexceptionalizing Displacement? Rethinking Citizenship and Mobility
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with the Office of the Provost; the University Center for International Studies (UCIS)
See Details

How are the forms of displacement and dispossession experienced by less mobile people similar to, or different from, those of people displaced across national borders?

The rising number of people undertaking often-dangerous border crossings has been labelled by national governments, global media, and scholars alike a global migration "crisis." These characterizations frame the "refugee" or "migrant" as a state of exception, the antithesis to the “citizen.” Such notions of crisis also elide or erase modes of displacement and struggle that may be chronic, normalized, and perhaps even banal, and which may be shared by groups often seen to be distinct. Indeed, even those with legal membership (citizens and long-term residents) face forms of dispossession which may entail both material and existential forms of internal displacement through gentrification, incarceration, environmental changes, unemployment, development, extractive economies, and increasingly unstable futures.
In a period when neoliberalism and accompanying forms of precarity may have become an increasingly pervasive context of everyday life for people across the globe, new understandings of in-group/out-group formations are emerging among scholars and research interlocutors alike, which complicate terms such as “citizens,” “refugees,” and “migrants.” Some scholars and political organizers alike have thus recently emphasized sites of connection and shared struggle that transect such a priori classifications, focusing on issues such as access to housing, healthcare, food, childcare, the labor market, and other shared needs. Such a move seeks to deexceptionalize displacement, demanding a reconsideration of mobility and citizenship alike.
What does deexceptionalizing displacement allow us to see and do? What roads of analysis does it open up, and what are the limits of such an approach? To what extent is the precarity that may unite diverse populations itself a new experience, and to what extent is it historically deep? What is peculiar to the forms of displacement unfolding in this contemporary neoliberal moment, and what do they demand from scholarship and political engagement alike?

Public Keynote Addresses: 9:30-12 pm, Friday, March 22, 2019
Bridget Anderson, University of Bristol, U.K.
Rashad Shabazz, Arizona State University

Workshops will take place Friday afternoon, March 22, and all day Saturday, March 23. Papers will be pre-circulated and preregistration is encouraged. More information to follow.

9:30 am Symposium
De-exceptionalizing Displacement?
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies and Global Studies Center along with Office of the Provost and University Center for International Studies (UCIS)
See Details

With increasing forms of precarity across the globe, there is a need to call attention to sites of struggle that bridge assumed divisions between ”migrants,” “refugees,” and “citizens.” These include access to housing, safety, thriving neighborhoods, healthcare, food, education, childcare, the labor market, and other shared needs. What would it mean to de-exceptionalize displacement, rethinking mobility and citizenship alike?

For more information please visit : https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/migrations, or contact sbv2@pitt.edu.

Friday, March 22

11:00 am Lecture
Almanac, Battledore, Chapbook: An ABC of Pre-Modern Popular Print for Children with M.O. Grenby
Location:
CL 501
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Children’s Literature Program
See Details

Matthew Grenby is Dean of Research and Innovation in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Newcastle University, UK, and Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies in its School of English. His research interests are in pre-modern children's literature and culture, political participation in the eighteenth century, and children and heritage. His books include The Anti-Jacobin Novel, The Child Reader, Popular Children’s Literature in Britain, and The Cambridge Companion to Children’s Literature.

2:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Maroon Queen, Mother of the Nation, & ‘Science Woman’: Using the Physical, Social and Metaphysical Sciences to Interrogate the History of Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies and Global Studies Center along with Center for Bioethics and Health Law, Center for Health Equity, Department of Human Genetics, Department of Sociology, Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Urban Studies Program, World History Center and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Dr. Harcourt Fuller is an Associate Professor at Georgia State University. His lecture is titled: Maroon Queen, Mother of the Nation, & “Science Woman”: Using the Physical, Social and Metaphysical Sciences to Interrogate the History of Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons. In his lecture, Dr. Fuller will explore the history of resistance against slavery in the Caribbean. In addition, he will also discuss his research methods for investigating the ethnogenesis and lived experiences of the Jamaican Maroons, including that of the 18th century leader, Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons.

The second part of his lecture will focus on the Maroon notion of Queen Nanny as “science woman,” “metaphysical scientist,” or “traditional environmental scientist,” as opposed to the negative, and misconstrued stereotypes promulgated by British planter-historians and colonial officials. He seeks to not only examine how scholars can use scientific methodologies in historical inquiry, but also to reevaluate the questions of what science and technology are, and how they have been used in the context of Maroon nations that survived and lived in their own worlds and on the periphery of European slave societies in the Americas.

Dr. Fuller is a Fulbright Global Scholar and Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University. Please join us for this lecture!

6:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: My Friend the Polish Girl
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

MY FRIEND THE POLISH GIRL borrows from cinema verite and video bloggers to create a rare naturalism in style and performance. Katie, a young, rich American, decides to make a documentary film about Alicja, an impulsive Polish actress living in London. During the making of the film, the interference of Katie in the life of her character proves to have serious consequences, both in their relationship and the film’s narrative. Set in a post-Brexit-vote London, Katie’s colonizing, disruptive presence in Alicja’s life mirrors the treatment of migrants in the UK: Welcomed, used, then discarded. MY FRIEND THE POLISH GIRL is a raw, sexual, and visually brash film exploring the abusive power and control over someone’s intimacy. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/myfriendthepolishgirl.html.

Friday, March 22 until Sunday, March 24

5:00 pm Seminar
Transforming Cities: Global Cities Mini Course
Location:
100 Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University Office of the Provost
See Details

Due to economic development and globalization, cities continue to grow with predictions that 70% of the world’s population will live in urban areas by the year 2050. This course, then, will view cities as hubs where patterns, connections, discussions, and the processes shape such issues as social justice, economic development, technology, migration, the environment among others. By examining cities as a lens, this sequence of weekend courses encourages students to examine cities as a system for discussing social processes being built and rebuilt. With an interdisciplinary focus, the course invites experts from the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon, and relevant fields more broadly. Course Topics: Global cities (Sp. 2019): This offering of the course will address the concept of global cities, including their distinctive cosmopolitan characteristics by exploring emergent edge cities, global cities of the past, and their relationship to other critical social issues. This offering will provide a broader overview by conceptualizing the issues of global cities, including questions of scale, the challenges of pluralism, and sustainability. It will offer a brief introduction to the future issues discussed in later iterations of the course. Smart cities and technology (Sp. 2020): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the influence of multinational corporations on cities; the rise of privacy issues in relation to adoption of technology within cities and homes; the replacement of human labor and access to employment; the role of technology on urban planning, among others. Cities and social justice (Sp. 2021): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the rapid growth of cities and their impact on fair housing, gentrification, and poverty; the role of human rights cities as models; the role of migration on cities; the role of governance addressing inequality; the need to have access to health care; among others. Cities and sustainability (Sp. 2022): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the role cities can have on climate change, low-emission growth and clean energy; the importance of access to resources; the need for sustainable transportation; the practices of sustainable consumption; among others. For more information and to register: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/mini-course/transforming-cities

Saturday, March 23

(All day) Symposium
2019 Islamic Studies Research Symposium: Identity, Culture and Contact Across the Islamic World
Location:
Slippery Rock University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Slippery Rock University
See Details

Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to present their research or a project (visual or literary arts) related to the broad conference theme. The day will include both student presentations and a keynote speaker. Presentations will be clustered along themes that emerge from paper submissions. Student information is available at CERIS website.

5:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Sofia
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
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In this caustic look at contemporary Moroccan society—where premarital sex and giving birth out of wedlock remains a crime—20-year-old Sofia suffers from pregnancy denial. When she secretly gives birth at a local hospital, they give her 24 hours to provide the father’s papers before informing the authorities. Director Meryem Benm'Barek-Aloïsi uses the ensuing family drama to expose the hypocrisy intrinsic to Morocco’s patriarchal culture. SOFIA approaches #MeToo discussions from a more global perspective, adding layers to an already important and nuanced movement. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/sofia.html.

5:00 pm Lecture
Commemoration of Greek Independence Week
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th floor gallery and auditorium
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms and Intercultural Exchange Programs
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Lecture on Greek independence followed by traditional Greek dances.

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Another Day of Life
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
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Based on renowned reporter Ryszard Kapuściński's book of the same name, ANOTHER DAY OF LIFE tells the gripping story of Kapuściński's three-month trip to civil war torn Angola in 1975. An idealist, Kapuściński is a friend to lost causes and revolutions. Although he has been to many front lines before, Angola changes him forever. Through both animation and live action footage, ANOTHER DAY OF LIFE blurs the line between action thriller, biopic, and documentary while vividly capturing the chaos and insanity of the war and Kapuściński's experiences. As he witnesses bloody horrors and questions the role of the war reporter, Kapuściński undergoes a deep change as a human being and is reborn - as a writer. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/Another_Day_of_Life.html.