Week of March 24, 2019 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, March 22 until Sunday, March 24

5:00 pm Seminar
Transforming Cities: Global Cities Mini Course
Location:
100 Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University Office of the Provost
See Details

Due to economic development and globalization, cities continue to grow with predictions that 70% of the world’s population will live in urban areas by the year 2050. This course, then, will view cities as hubs where patterns, connections, discussions, and the processes shape such issues as social justice, economic development, technology, migration, the environment among others. By examining cities as a lens, this sequence of weekend courses encourages students to examine cities as a system for discussing social processes being built and rebuilt. With an interdisciplinary focus, the course invites experts from the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon, and relevant fields more broadly. Course Topics: Global cities (Sp. 2019): This offering of the course will address the concept of global cities, including their distinctive cosmopolitan characteristics by exploring emergent edge cities, global cities of the past, and their relationship to other critical social issues. This offering will provide a broader overview by conceptualizing the issues of global cities, including questions of scale, the challenges of pluralism, and sustainability. It will offer a brief introduction to the future issues discussed in later iterations of the course. Smart cities and technology (Sp. 2020): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the influence of multinational corporations on cities; the rise of privacy issues in relation to adoption of technology within cities and homes; the replacement of human labor and access to employment; the role of technology on urban planning, among others. Cities and social justice (Sp. 2021): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the rapid growth of cities and their impact on fair housing, gentrification, and poverty; the role of human rights cities as models; the role of migration on cities; the role of governance addressing inequality; the need to have access to health care; among others. Cities and sustainability (Sp. 2022): This iteration of the course will explore such topics as: the role cities can have on climate change, low-emission growth and clean energy; the importance of access to resources; the need for sustainable transportation; the practices of sustainable consumption; among others. For more information and to register: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/mini-course/transforming-cities

Sunday, March 24

3:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Rafiki
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

The first Kenyan film to screen at Cannes & banned in its home country, RAFIKI bursts onto the screen with fresh energy. “Good Kenyan girls become good Kenyan wives,” but Kena and Ziki long for something more. A tender tale of forbidden first love told in an electric, colorful Afropop style, RAFIKI tells the story of the touching, but illegal romance between Kena, a skateboarding tomboy, and Ziki, the charismatic daughter of a conservative local politician. When rumors begin to swirl about the nature of their relationship, the young lovers find themselves in great jeopardy. Combined with the charming leads, Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva, RAFIKI is another highlight in esteemed director Wanuri Kahiu’s filmography. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/rafiki.html.

4:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: What is Democracy?
Location:
City of Asylum
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Coming at a moment of profound political and social crisis, WHAT IS DEMOCRACY? reflects on a word we often take for granted. This philosophical journey spans millennia and continents: from ancient Athens’ groundbreaking experiment in self-government, to modern-day Greece grappling with financial collapse, and a mounting refugee crisis to the United States reckoning with its racist past and the growing gap between rich and poor. This urgent film connects the past and the present, the emotional and the intellectual, the personal and the political, in order to provoke and inspire. If we want to live in democracy, we must first ask what the word even means. WHAT IS DEMOCRACY? asks the right questions. More information and tickets can be at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/whatisdemocracy.html.

Monday, March 25

(All day) Information Session
Roadmap to Model African Union
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Final preparation and review of your country's position, policies and aspirations leading up to the MAU Conference.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
International Day of Remembrance of Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade: Meditations on Historical Truth-Telling
Location:
330 (African Heritage Room) Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
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For over 400 years, more than 15 million men, women and children were the victims of the tragic transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest chapters in human history.
Every year on 25 March, the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade offers the opportunity to honor and remember those who suffered and died at the hands of the brutal slavery system. The International Day also aims to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice today.

1:00 pm Lecture
Critical Research on Africa Series
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Dr. Mary B. Setrana is a lecturer at the Centre for Migration Studies, University of Ghana, Legon. She was appointed the first female lecturer at the Centre for Migration Studies by the University of Ghana. Dr. Setrana applies her multidisciplinary background of sociology, political science, linguistics and migration in her teaching and research that uniquely distinguishes her output. Published both nationally and internationally, Dr. Setrana is the 2019 winner of the US Department of state Award to represent Ghana in Delaware on the “National Security & Policymaking” program.

5:00 pm Workshop
Peace Corps Application Workshop
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter
See Details

Make your application stand out from the rest. Attend this workshop to learn how to browse Volunteer openings, find the right program, and strengthen your application. You will have an opportunity to ask questions about service, learn steps you can take to improve your chances, and gain valuable tips to guide you through the application process.

Register to Attend: https://www.peacecorps.gov/events/19_vrs_app_pitt_20190325/

6:15 pm Workshop
Russian Conversation Table
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

8:00 pm Lecture
Student BPHIL/IAS Global Studies Defense: An Exploration of System Justification in China: Public Opinion on Air Quality
Location:
4801 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Alyssa Martinec (senior, Political Science/BPHI/IAS/Global Studies) will defend her thesis on the global phenomenon of populations accepting environmental problems as an externality of economic development using case studies from Shanghai, China.

Tuesday, March 26

12:00 pm Lecture
After Suburbia: Research and Action in the Suburban Century
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Urbanization is at the core of the global economy today. Yet, the crucial aspect of 21st century urban development is suburbanization - defined as an increase in non-central city population and economic activity, as well as urban spatial expansion. It includes all manner of peripheral growth: from the wealthy gated communities of Southern California, to the high rise-dominated suburbs of Europe and Canada, the exploding outskirts of Indian and Chinese cities, and the slums and squatter settlements in Africa and Latin America.

Professor Roger Keil (York University), author of Suburban Planet, presents the current strands of global research on suburbanization, and discusses the consequences of the suburban century for scholars, activists, and citizens.

1:30 pm Workshop
Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
Global Migration and Labor Activism: Perspectives from Asia and Latin America
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

This panel discussion will feature Eni Lestari, Chairperson of International Migrants Alliance, and Natividad Obeso, President of the Association of United Migrant and Refugee Women in Argentina. The speakers will discuss the work of their respective organizations and how the work of scholars and activists can most productively intersect around the issues that matter for migrant women workers.

Wednesday, March 27

12:00 pm Lecture
From Leo Frank to Tree of Life: A History of Antisemitic Violence in America
Location:
1502 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of Religious Studies, Department of Jewish Studies, Department of History and Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
1:00 pm Lecture
Student BPHIL/IAS Global Studies Defense: Oppression, Activism, and the Political Participation of Indigenous Peoples: Case Study in Yucatán, Mexico
Location:
4217 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Kristen Gugerli, (senior, Political Science, BPHIL/IAS/Global Studies) will defend her thesis exploring the history of indigenous peoples around the world, and how this has influenced the current rates of political participation by indigenous peoples with specific attention to state of Yucatán, Mexico.

4:30 pm Lecture
Cinema and Television in Europe and Beyond: A History of Censorship and Manipulation Through Translation
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of French & Italian, The Department of Classics, Humanities Center and Faculty Research and Scholarship Program
See Details

A part of passages: translation & the mediation of time & space. Passages is a semester-long series of lectures, workshops, and conversations on translation and its impact.

6:30 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Obscuro Barroco
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

OBSCURO BARROCO tows the line between documentary and fiction as it tackles the dizzying heights of gender and metamorphosis. It is also a cinematographic homage to a land of extremes: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Following the path of iconic transgender figure Luana Muniz, the film explores different quests for the self through her own gender identity, Carnaval, and political struggle. A poetic film, OBSCURO BARROCO asks questions about one’s desire for transformation of the body, whether intimate or social, paired with beautifully vibrant, and mesmerizing footage of Rio de Janeiro’s colorful population and cityscapes. More Information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/obscurobarroco.html.

Thursday, March 28

12:00 pm Lecture
Exhibit Talk, Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Hillman Library, Ground Floor Lobby
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Join us for an Exhibit Talk on the current Hillman Library exhibit, Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present. This talk is part of a series of events including faculty and guest speakers and films. The Exhibit Talk will begin in the Ground Floor Lobby of Hillman Library then move to the Second Floor.

12:00 pm Career Counselling
Career Talk: Working at the World Bank and Other International Organizations
Location:
3610 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Dina Elnaggar is the World Bank communications lead for the Finance, Competitiveness Innovation (FCI) Global Practice. Dina has more than 20 years’ experience in advocacy, strategic communications, risk management, media CSO relations. She joined the World Bank Group in 2007 as Senior Communications Officer in the MNA and then moved to the Integrity Vice Presidency (INT) as its communications lead. Prior to joining the World Bank, Dina was a UNDP project manager responsible for the design and implementation of projects related to the environment and child rights. She also worked as a technical advisor to the Danida-funded environmental portfolio in Egypt and as a consultant for USAID, DFID and the World Bank in the environment, health and social protection sectors. Lunch will be provided and space is limited, so please RSVP by Monday, 3/25 in writing to Stephen Lund at slund@pitt.edu.

1:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa: Why Peacekeeping Fails: Experiences from Angola & Mozambique
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Dr. Dennis Jett will give a presentation on why peacekeeping succeeded in Mozambique at the same time it failed in Angola. He will go over perspectives on how conflict has evolved, how peacekeeping has changed as a result and why in most cases today peacekeeping is making no contribution to peace.

Dr. Jett served as the Ambassador to Mozambique, the Senior Director for African Affairs on the National Security Council, and the Deputy Chief of Mission and Charge d'Affaires in Malawi and Liberia.

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
From Komsomol to NGO: Experts, Activists, and Changing Paradigms of Development in Central Asia and Beyond
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Thornburgh Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Presented by Artemy Kalinovsky, Senior Lecturer, East European Studies, University of Amsterdam.

This event is a part of the Guest Speaker Series of Silk Roads Rising: Globalization and Exchange from the 10th Century to the Present

3:30 pm Reading Group
Women's History Month Faculty Book Discussion
Location:
Mount Aloysius College Library
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with CERIS
4:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Peering Under the Rug: Sources of Information about Russia
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Political Science and Department of History
See Details

Mark Galeotti, Senior Associate Fellow at Royal United Services Institute

Maxim Trudolyubov, Vedomosti, Kennan Institute

Kevin Rothrock, Meduza

A popular meme about Russian politics is that it’s like “bulldogs fighting under a rug.” Namely, it’s opaque, shadowy, full of rumors, and driven by conspiracies. This image have become more common in the West over Putin’s long reign, and intensified since Russia’s interference in the 2016 US Presidential election. Where can we turn for clearer vision given the supposed murkiness of Russian politics? This moderated roundtable discussion with Mark Galeotti, Maxim Trudolubov, and Kevin Rothrock will explore media and human sources of information about contemporary Russia and its many promises and roadblocks.

6:00 pm Reading Group
Four Evenings: Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
Location:
Hillman Library 171B (Latin American Lecture Room)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with National Consortium for Teaching About Asia - University of Pittsburgh, University Library System and Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures
See Details

Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

March 28 | 6-7pm | Hillman Library 171B
Conversation with Seung-hwan Shin, Assistant Professor in East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh

April 1 | 7:30pm | Carnegie Music Hall
Lecture by Min Jin Lee

In conjunctions with the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures program's "Ten Evenings" series, GSC is hosting "Four Evenings," pre-lecture discussions that put prominent world authors and their work in global perspective. Open to series subscribers and the Pitt Community, these evening discussion, conducted by Pitt experts, provide additional insight on prominent writers and engaging issues. A limited number of tickets to the author's lectures are available.

Co-sponsored by the Global Studies Center, National Consortium for Teaching About Asia - University of Pittsburgh, University Library System, and Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Working Woman
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Orna is the mother of three young children with a husband struggling to start his own restaurant. To help support her family she returns to the workplace, landing a job with a former army superior, Benny, who is now a successful real estate developer. While Orna embraces her new position and tries to balance its demands with her home life, she begins to experience escalating sexual harassment from her boss. WORKING WOMAN is a strikingly relevant and global tale in the midst of today’s #MeToo movement, all of which comes out through the empowering performance of Liron Ben Shlush and calculated direction of Michal Aviad. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/workingwoman.html.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, March 30

(All day) Conference
Symposium | Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Department of Anthropology and Pitt Global
See Details

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at http://soyuz.americananthro.org/symposium/.

(All day) Conference
Latin American Social and Public Policy Conference
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference
March 29 - 30, 2019

The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Pittsburgh welcomes faculty and students to the 23rd Latin American Social and Public Policy (LASPP) Conference. At the conference, researchers can present their scholarly work related to social and public policy in Latin America.
Our team is focused on assuring a high-quality and open environment for the exchange of ideas and the improvement of works in progress. Following the multidisciplinary tradition of CLAS, we are interested in facilitating dialogue across disciplines, theoretical perspectives, and methodologies. In that spirit, we encourage the organization of panels around problems, rather than disciplines, and welcome submissions from the social sciences, arts, humanities, and cultural studies.

*

Friday, March 29th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
The Seventeenth Carmelo Mesa-Lago Distinguished Latin American Social and Public Policy Keynote Speaker for this year is:
Dr. Aníbal Pérez-Liñán (Professor of Political Science and Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame; Editor-in-Chief, Latin American Research Review; and Co-editor, Kellogg Series in Democracy and Development)

*

Saturday, March 30th, 2019
12:30 p.m., Location TBA
Special Roundtable: The Challenges of the Policy Cycle in Brazilian Politics
Carlos Pereira: Full Professor at the Brazilian Public and Business Administration School, Getulio Vargas Foundation
Barry Ames: Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Pittsburgh
B. Guy Peters: Maurice Falk Professor of American Government at the University of Pittsburgh

*

Relevant dates:
Deadline for abstract submission: January 18, 2019 - click here to submit abstracts
Deadline for full paper submission: March 1, 2019
Conference: March 29 and 30, 2019

*

For more information, visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp

Friday, March 29

(All day) Workshop
Climate Change: Workshop on Cap & Trade Initiatives
Location:
Kimbo Conference Room, William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
12:00 pm Lecture
Upwardly Mobile Women in Urban China
Location:
2432 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center
See Details

China's economic growth and urbanization have created new opportunities and roles for women, such as through education, migration, and employment. But with these changes, new challenges arise, especially as these impact on gender norms and relations. In this lecture, Dr. Arianne M. Gaetano, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Women's Studies Program at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama will consider women of different socioeconomic status in the metropolises of Beijing and Shanghai, particularly unmarried and newly married rural migrant workers and educated urban professionals in their 20s and 30s.

Dr. Arianne M. Gaetano is a cultural anthropologist, her research focuses on contemporary Chinese society.

3:00 pm Lecture
BPHIL/IAS Global Studies Defense: Rural-Urban Gendered Migration Pathways and Desires under Neoliberalism Socioeconomic Reform in Contemporary China
Location:
4217 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

SiLang Huang (senior, Politics and Philosophy, BPHIL/IAS Global Studies) will defend her thesis on changes that have taken place under China's neoliberal reform since the 1980s with regard to migratory opportunities, gender roles and social hierarchies, documenting a Chinese migrant family from rural Hunan Province.

5:00 pm Symposium
Keynote Speaker: Soyuz Symposium
Location:
5317 Sennot Square
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Pitt Global and Department of Anthropology
See Details

Keynote Address by Manduhai Buyandelger, Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT, Author of Tragic Spirits: Shamanism, Gender and Memory in Contemporary Mongolia, "Self-Polishing and Electoral Selves: Elections and The New Economies of Democratization in Postsocialist Mongolia"

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Dogman
Location:
Regent Square Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Based on a true crime story that fascinated Italy in the 1980s, DOGMAN follows Marcello, a small and gentle dog groomer. When Marcello is not devoting himself to his dogs or beloved daughter, he sells cocaine on the side. The money helps, but he fears his biggest customer, Simoncino, a former violent boxer who terrorizes the entire neighborhood. After a double-crossing, Marcello will be pushed to his limits and submit to an unexpected act of vengeance. Set in a seedy beachside wasteland, DOGMAN shines a light on the grimy reality of the Italian underworld through bleak directing from Matteo Garrone (GOMORRAH), intimate cinematography, and an empathetic performance from Marcello Fonte. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/dogman.html.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, April 13

7:00 pm Film
Italian Film Festival of Pittsburgh
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of

Saturday, March 30

1:00 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: The Great War 1914-1918
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Nationality Rooms, Pitt Global and Serb National Federation
See Details

Book presented by Bishop Irinej and Krinka V. Petrov. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

The book is dedicated to the Great War, an event that shook the world one hundred years ago. Within this vast historical frame-work, this book focuses on the relationship between two Allies—the Kingdom of Serbia and the United States of America, including the role of the Serbian American Diaspora. The chapters in this book deal with general issues regarding Serbia’s role in the Great War, beginning with the event that would trigger the war and put the small town of Sarajevo on the world map. This book offers a wealth of information as well as a fascinating narrative of the human urge to resist, survive, and be free to live and love.

1:00 pm Film
Serbian Movie Festival
Location:
Cathedral of Learning 232 and Cathedral of Learning 324
Sponsored by:
Nationality Rooms along with Center for Russian and East European Studies, Yugoslav Room Committee and Serb National Federation
See Details

A film series promoting the rich cultural heritage of Serbia.
1:00 p.m.- The Great War 1914-1918
2:30 p.m.- The Long Road to War
4:45 p.m.- Twice Upon a Time
6:00 p.m.- Tesla Nation

2:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Liyana
Location:
Rangos Giant Cinema, Carnegie Science Center
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Under the guidance of acclaimed South African storyteller, Gcina Mhlophe, a group of orphaned children in the Kingdom of Swaziland confront past trauma through the collaborative creation of their own fictional story depicted through vivid animation. Their young heroine, Liyana, must embark on a dangerous quest to save her brothers after their home is violently attacked and her siblings are stolen away. Confronting painful memories, profound insights are revealed as the children shape Liyana’s mythic journey and parallels are drawn between her fate and that of the young storytellers. Named one of the Best Family Movies of the Year by HuffPost, LIYANA is for storytellers of any age. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/liyana.html.

2:30 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: The Long Road to War
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This film screening is part of the Serbian Film Festival. The Long Road to War directed by Milos Skundric. Pizza and light refreshments served.

What was a real cause and trigger of World War I? World War I began a month after the Sarajevoassassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, in 1914. But this stake had been prepared decades before. The Long Road to War is a feature-length cinema documentary about the origins of WWI. Leading European intellectuals from Oxford, Cambridge, Sorbonne, and other universities present their views about the causes and trigger of World War I. The movie leads the public through the political games behind the scenes and presents details when the decision was made about the future of Europe. The documentary utilizes film and photographs from some fifteen archival houses
around the world, so it is “more action – less talking heads on screen.” Milos Skundric, Director, says that he was shocked to learn how little he and his generation knew about the reason behind this “seminal catastrophe of the 20th century.”

4:45 pm Film
Serbian Movie Festival: Twice Upon a Time
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This event is part of the Serbian Movie Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

Twice Upon a Time, directed by Vojin Vasovic.
All children for the cartoon will receive a gift from the SNF.
This is an amusing and educational cartoon for children and adults. Once upon a time, in some distant world lived two kings: King of Warrior and King of Poet. In fact, it is about the dual nature and split personality of one king. One half of his personality represents a Nordic barbaric king from the early Middle Ages, a crude but fearless warrior. The other half is from late Baroque, a man of graceful poise and manners. They share their conscience, but have opposing wishes and desperately want to get rid of each other. This story brings us a noble message which can enrich our lives. The cartoon was screened at 60 international movie festivals and won more than 20 international awards.

6:00 pm Festival
Serbian Movie Festival: Tesla Nation
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
See Details

This film screening is a part of the Serbian Film Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served. Tesla Nation directed by Zeljko Mirkovic.

This marvelous documentary leads us through the Serbian-American history which spans more than 200 years. Serbian-American history began in a symbolic way with Djordje Sagic aka George Fisher who arrived through the port of Philadelphia at the beginning of the ninetieth century. After him, Serbian immigrants came in several waves and helped shape American history. The movie describes Serbian-American contributions
in building the United States and the world and the importance of preserving the Serbian heritage. Zeljko Jack Dimich, the Serbian-American Actor from New York, plays Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American Scientist and Inventor, and is the narrator of the movie. The movie was sponsored by the Serb National Federation among others, and produced by Optimistic Film and Radio Television of Serbia.

7:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: Blindspotting
Location:
McConomy Auditorium, CMU
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
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BLINDSPOTTING is a landmark film that blends poetry, rap, buddy comedy, and social commentary to depict life in the increasingly “hip” Oakland. Collin, played by Hamilton star Daveed Diggs, faces his final three days of probation and needs to stay clear of trouble. Miles, his troublemaking childhood best friend, can’t stay out of it. When Collin witnesses a police shooting, the two men’s friendship is tested as they grapple with identity, racism, and changed realities in the rapidly-gentrifying neighborhood they grew up in. This bold and thought-provoking film bursts with energy, style, and humor while also providing a relevant examination of Black America through the use of hip/hop and rap poetically performed by the two likeable leads. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/Blindspotting.html.

8:00 pm Performance
Afropop Ensemble: Spring Concert
Location:
Bellefield Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of
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In 1988, a radio series called Public Radio International (PRI) coined the term “Afropop” to refer to a cross section of traditional and urban music styles that originated or had roots in Africa. At their recital On 30 March 2019, the Pitt Afropop Ensemble will perform Afropop music that has either been influenced or has influenced other music styles from the Americas and Europe. The performance on March 30 will have the Pitt Afropop ensemble students expose Afro-reggae, highlife, Afrobeat and Afro-jazz, genres that have resulted from the fusion of African and Western musics. The performance will specifically focus on exposing what I refer to as sonic migrations between Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Caribbean. “Sonic Migrations” is an exploration of how sound has traveled from Africa to other locations of the world and back to Africa. The event will expose connections between rumba of Cuba and soukous from the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Jamaican reggae and Afro-reggae.

Dr. David Aarons, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, will give a talk on the connections between Jamaican reggae and Afro-reggae. Dr. Aarons has studied the migrations of Jamaican people and their music to Ethiopia. He joined the faculty at UNCG in 2018 and currently teaches such courses as “American Music” and “Music of World Cultures”.

Admission:
Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $8.50; non-Pitt students and seniors are $5. At the door: general admission is $12; non-Pitt students and seniors are $8. Pitt students: free with valid ID.