Week of April 7, 2019 in UCIS

Thursday, October 25 until Wednesday, May 1

8:30 am Exhibit
Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Location:
Ground and Second Floors, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Year of PittGlobal and Hillman Library
See Details

Free and Open to the Public during Hillman Library Hours

The term Silk Road, coined by 19th century German explorer Ferdinand von Richthofen, refers to a loose network of overland trade routes stretching from the Mediterranean to East Asia. Textiles, gems, spices, animals and even religions were all exchanged along this vast expanse, starting around 1,000 B.C. and continuing for millennia. For much of this time, most Silk Road traders coming from western Eurasia were Muslim, and they brought their beliefs and rich culture to millions of people.

A Crossroads of Ideas

While the Silk Road was a two-way route, most of its movement was eastward, carrying Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and later, Islam.

By the 8th century, Muslims stopped thinking of religion geographically and began seeking converts along the Silk Road. The benefits of conversion to such a widespread religion were many, as Muslims preferred trading with other Muslims.

Islamic scientific and medical advancements also had significant impact on Silk Road travelers. Chinese Buddhist traders adopted Islamic medical knowledge in wound healing and urinalysis. Muslims brought India their insights on astronomy, including a skepticism of the geocentric universe.

Cultural Exchange Along the Route

Influences from Buddhist China and other regions also affected radical changes in Islam. In the 12th century, abstract Islamic art suddenly started depicting human figures, long considered forbidden in Islam. Murals showing Buddhist statues and Indian narrative artwork started appearing in mosques, and Islamic art exploded with new techniques and figures. Chinese technologies, such as paper production and gunpowder, were transmitted to the West. Iran’s art in the Mongol period (13th and 14th centuries) is dramatically influenced by Chinese artistic traditions.

The Exhibit Design

The ground floor cases in Hillman Library feature a map of the Silk Road from its Eastern terminus in the Chinese city of Xian to its western terminus in Constantinople. They also display the late-14th century Catalan Atlas, the most detailed world map of its time, showing key places along and major figures who traveled the overland route of the Silk Road. The exhibit continues on the second floor of Hillman Library in five thematic display cases:

*Horses and Dynasties: Cartography and Painting in China, 10th-14th Centuries,
*Alexander the Great, Kublai Khan, and Marco Polo: Confluences of Power and Exchange in Assia,
*Musical Encounters in the Deserts and Mountains of Central Asia,
*Explorations in Turkestan: Aurel Stein and Bamiyan, and
*New World Exploitation and the China Trade with Europe.

Friday, March 29 until Saturday, April 13

7:00 pm Film
Italian Film Festival of Pittsburgh
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
European Studies Center on behalf of

Sunday, April 7

2:00 pm Workshop
Balinese Offerings
Location:
Room 837 William Pitt Union, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of Music
See Details

Learn how to make beautiful palm and floral offerings in the traditional Balinese style with expert artisan Ida Ayu Kumalayoni. A brief lecture on offerings in Bali will be followed by a hands-on workshop.

Event is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact asia@pitt.edu.

4:00 pm Film
FACES OF WO/MEN Film Screening: What is Democracy?
Location:
Kelly-Strayhorn Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Jewish Studies Program, Pitt Film and Media Studies, Pitt Film Talk, Pitt's German Film Fund, Department of English, Student Office of Sustainability and Several Community Sponsors
See Details

Coming at a moment of profound political and social crisis, WHAT IS DEMOCRACY? reflects on a word we often take for granted. This philosophical journey spans millennia and continents: from ancient Athens’ groundbreaking experiment in self-government, to modern-day Greece grappling with financial collapse, and a mounting refugee crisis to the United States reckoning with its racist past and the growing gap between rich and poor. This urgent film connects the past and the present, the emotional and the intellectual, the personal and the political, in order to provoke and inspire. If we want to live in democracy, we must first ask what the word even means. WHAT IS DEMOCRACY? asks the right questions. More information and tickets can be found at https://www.cmu.edu/faces/2019/whatisdemocracy.html.

7:00 pm Film
The Colorado
Location:
Bellefield Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Arts, Music Department, Film Studies and Office of Sustainability
See Details

The Colorado has been hailed as one of the most profound documentaries in recent memory. This beautiful film explores the complex relationship between the Colorado River and the people who have inhabited its basin across history. Three key figures from The Colorado will introduce the film, including Christa Sadler, field producer and author of the accompanying book, Murat Eyuboglu, director, cinematographer, and co-writer, and Paola Prestini, composer. More information please visit: pi.tt/thecolorado.

Monday, April 8

12:00 pm Lecture
Welcome to the Anthropocene
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Arts
See Details

Christa Sadler, field producer and author of The Colorado, will discuss her role as a production manager and author of the accompanying book for the film. She will also discuss humans’ dominant influence on our environment and climate. This discussion will be a one hour workshop/ lecture and a Q & A session about her work.

3:00 pm Lecture
What is Neoliberalism with GSC Post Doc Kat Frances
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Kat Frances discussed NeoLiberalism through her research on feminist discourse in modern urban South Asia.

3:30 pm Information Session
Founding a Startup as an Immigrant
Location:
O'Hara Student Center, Dining Room
Announced by:
Director's Office on behalf of the Year of Pitt Global
See Details

Nitin Pachisia is an entrepreneur-turned-investor and recently featured in Forbes for his work with Unshackled Ventures, but prior to this he experienced the myths and misinformation that many immigrant entrepreneurs face when forming a startup.

Join us for a discussion with Nitin as he shares his own experience founding startups while on a visa and how immigrant entrepreneurs can find the right information on how to start their next venture. Are you an aspiring entrepreneur without U.S. citizenship? Do you want to stay in the U.S. to and start your own business but have questions on how to do it? Do you want to better understand the venture resources available for immigrant entrepreneurs?

On Monday, April 8, the Innovation Institute will be hosting a fireside style session with Unshackled Ventures founding partner, Nitin Pachisia. Unshackled Ventures is a Silicon Valley based pre-seed fund focused on immigrant founders and international students. RSVP Here.

For students: Work as a part of the Unshackled team during the school year. Learn more here.

LEARN ABOUT UNSHACKLED VENTURES

Unshackled Ventures was started in 2014 with a single mission: help immigrant founders succeed faster.

6:15 pm Workshop
Russian Conversation Table
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

7:00 pm Cultural Event/Presentation/Reading Group
EU Prize for Literature Book Reading with David Machado
Location:
Carnegie Library South Wing Reading Room
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
See Details

Almodovar is in prison, Daniel is living in a van, and Xavier hasn't left the house is years.

David Machado's award-winning novel, The Shelf Life of Happiness, follows the story of three adult friends as they navigate and deteriorate under the stresses of Portugal's financial crisis of 2008. The novel won the EU Prize for Literature in 2019.

The ESC, in partnership with UNC Center for European Studies and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is delighted to present a reading from The Shelf Life of Happiness with David Machado.

This event is free and open to all. Join us to hear some award-winning writing and a brief talk from the author. A Q&A will follow.

Tuesday, April 9

12:00 pm Lecture
"Be a Little Careful": Performance and the Politics of Representing Slow Sexual Violence
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

On December 16, 2012 in New Delhi, India, a young woman and her male companion boarded a bus after seeing a film at a South Delhi theater. Instead of taking them home, the six men already on the bus brutally gang raped the woman and then dumped her and her male companion on the side of the road. Thirteen days later in a Singapore hospital, she died of the injuries she had received that night. By the time she died, the story of her rape was internationally infamous. It had sparked massive public protests and outrage throughout India. It had also shone a spotlight on the particular problem of public violence against women in urban India. Indian feminist performance artists were troubled by the way the discourse around this incident highlighted acts of extraordinary violence and effectively erased the ordinary violence all women experience on a daily basis. They argued that a focus on extraordinary violence made women afraid, made men (or at least a certain kind of man) seem inhuman, and made change appear impossible. Instead, artists such as Mallika Taneja, Jana Natya Manch, and Niranjani Iyer created performances that drew attention to what I call “slow sexual violence,” a violence so small and so stealthily normal that few think to label it violence in the first place. Through their embodied performances, these artists highlight the effects such violence has on the body and psyche of women in public space and, crucially, suggest modes for retraining the body to empower people to put an end to sexual violence no matter its scale. This talk will explore the concept of “slow sexual violence” and argue that live, embodied performance is a necessary medium for making such slow violence visible and comprehensible.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Faculty Networking Opportunity: The Global Salon
Location:
William Pitt Union, Lower Lounge
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with Year of Pitt Global
See Details

All University of Pittsburgh faculty, tenure stream and non-tenure stream, are invited to a special series of networking opportunities made possible by the Year of Pitt Global. This Global Salon series brings together faculty and researchers from across the University to build relationships and share proposed or ongoing research. The Salons are organized around the UN's Sustainable Development Goals in five themes: People, Prosperity, Planet, Peace, and Partnership.

Goals for the Global Salon:

1. Increase local networks, build new relationships, form working groups

2. Encourage open dialogue across disciplines and develop common research agendas

3. Highlight efforts Pitt faculty undertake to address global issues

Additionally, Global Salon participants may be eligible for seed grant funding to advance multi-disciplinary research projects.

The Global Salons are free of charge, and lunch is provided, but registration is required. Register here: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6hZGlhwSyLx5DM1

Each Global Salon allows faculty to enjoy lunch while discussing their research informally through conversation groups. All faculty, regardless of full-time, part-time, or tenure status, are welcome to register.

Faculty Luncheon Series: The Global Salon

February 19 and 28, March 5 and 19, and April 9

Noon – 1:30 p.m.
William Pitt Union, Lower Lounge

PEOPLE
Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, to ensure that all human beings can fulfill their potential in dignity and equality and in healthy environments.

PROSPERITY
Thursday, February 28, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

PLANET
Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies and technologies to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change to support present and future generations.

PEACE
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies to foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies that are free from fear and violence, and directed toward an understanding that no sustainable development can occur without peace and no peace can occur without sustainable development.

PARTNERSHIP
Tuesday, April 9, 2019
Salon focus: Research on strategies to mobilize and implement global partnerships for sustainable development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, and focused on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable.

1:30 pm Workshop
Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
See Details

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

Wednesday, April 10

2:00 pm Symposium
Global Studies Student Research Symposium
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Join us for our Global Studies Student Research Symposium featuring presentations from 5 of our BPhil Students. Each student will give a 10-15 minute presentation with time for Q&A led by Dr. Michael Goodhart. All are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be served.

3:00 pm Film
The Silk Road on Screen: The Orator
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Latin American Lecture Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
See Details

This film is about a young man recalling his grandfather, who during the days of the revolution became the leading political speaker in Uzbekistan even though he retained all three of his wives.

Running Time: 81 minutes

Introduction by Olia Kim, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh

Thursday, April 11 until Saturday, April 13

4:30 pm Conference
Representations of Afrolatinidad
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Office of the Chancellor, Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative, Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Year of Pitt Global, Humanities Center and Department of Africana Studies
See Details

Representations of Afrolatinidad
University of Pittsburgh
April 11-13, 2019
Conference Convened by the Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative

About the Conference:
The intersections of race, ethnicity, and representation have shaped historical and contemporary articulations of Afrolatinidad. As an expression of multivalent identity, both shared and unique, Afrolatinidad informs the experiences of over 150 million Afro-Latin Americans and millions more within diasporic communities in the United States, Canada, Europe, and beyond. The conference seeks to foster an international dialogue that addresses regional, national, and transnational links among the ways Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinxs create, sustain, and transform meanings surrounding blackness in political, social, and cultural contexts.

This two-day symposium aims to engage multiple depictions of Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinxs – whether self-fashioned or imposed. The varied portrayals in the past and present reflect the ongoing global realities, struggles, vibrancy, and resiliency of Afro-Latin diasporas throughout the Americas and elsewhere. The symposium will feature keynote addresses by Dr. Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science at Brown University, and Dr. Nancy Mirabal, Associate Professor of American Studies and Director of the U.S. Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland-College Park. Their work on Afro-descendant politics in Latin America and Afro-Latinx discourses of race, gender, and territoriality, respectively, will spark broader exchanges around Afrolatinidad and representation among presenters and attendees.

Co-Sponsors: University of Pittsburgh Office of the Chancellor, Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Year of Pitt Global, Humanities Center, Center for Latin American Studies, and the Department of Africana Studies

For questions or additional information, contact Dr. Michele Reid-Vazquez, University of Pittsburgh, mbr31@pitt.edu

Friday, April 12

(All day) Symposium
European & Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2019
Location:
William Pitt Union 527, 538, & 548
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and GOSECA
See Details

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event since 2002 designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or Central Eurasia. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus. After the initial submission of papers, selected participants are grouped into panels according to their research topics. The participants then give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

9:30 am Workshop
Global Health Inequities and Infectious Diseases Workshop
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Year of Pitt Global, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Center for Global Health, Center for International Legal Education, Ford Institute for Human Security, Center for Bioethics and Health Law and School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh
See Details

The workshop will bring together a multidisciplinary group of scholars at the University of Pittsburgh and beyond to examine global health inequities in the distribution of infectious diseases. Highly infectious diseases reflect global inequities worldwide, making up five of the top ten leading causes of death in low-income countries while constituting only one of the top ten causes of death in high-income countries.
The workshop will be composed of keynotes, panel sessions and one plenary session. The sessions will consist of panelists invited to present a work-in progress that reflects the workshop theme. The workshop will conclude with a plenary session to discuss the potential for future collaboration and next steps. There is no fee to attend the conference, but registration is required and canbe found at https://www.law.pitt.edu/globalhealth, where a complete schedule and more information can also be found.

10:30 am Reading Group
Emerging Latino Communities Reading and Publishing Group
Location:
1154 Public Health
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Center for Health Equity
See Details

Emerging Latino Communities Reading and Publishing Group

1154 Public Health
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

April 12

The Center for Health Equity, with the support of the Center for Latin American Studies, invites you to explore 1) the problems Latinos in small yet rapidly growing populations face, and 2) how to solve those problems. We will read articles and offer feedback to those who are writing manuscripts. We hope to get new writing and research collaborations going!

Open to all interested: students, faculty, staff, and practitioners from Pitt and beyond. We will meet over coffee and light snacks in a relaxed atmosphere. If you want to get extra network time, we will be there 30 before and after the meeting time.

For more information, visit healthequity.pitt.edu or e-mail Chantel Durrant cjd13@pitt.edu

12:15 pm Workshop
Careers Abroad: Intercultural Development Workshop
Location:
3610 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Christa Uehlinger, Ph. D., Rooney Scholar from Robert Morris University (RMU), will be hosting a workshop with University of Pittsburgh students on developing intercultural competence overseas. This can be a workshop for students who have studied abroad or who will study, live or work abroad, or just want to get some understanding of how to recognize that everyone is a product of their own culture and how to work inter-culturally!

Dr. Uehlinger is an experienced intercultural professional and a lecturer in intercultural communication in the department of Business Administration at FHS St. Gallen, Switzerland, RMU’s international partner. She received her Ph.D. and Master’s degree in law from the University of Zurich and holds further certificates in intercultural communication from ICI/Portland, OR, in PR from NYU and Psychosynthesis. Her primary research subject is developing intercultural competence, using a comprehensive approach. She has written books and several articles on this topic, as well as developed a game,“ Puzzling Intercultural Stories.” Dr. Uehlinger has lived, worked, and traveled in Europe, Canada, the US, Australia, and Asia.

Lunch will be served and spots are limited so your RSVP is required at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc-snwmlqKUWSoEDGdOhqtp-TmZ_KL4.... Please contact Jacob Garcia with any questions at jag292@pitt.edu.

1:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
The Echos of Immigration
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
3:00 pm Presentation
African Studies Program - Graduation Presentation
Location:
4318 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

The graduation presentation is an opportunity for students receiving the Certificate in African Studies to reflect on their experience studying about Africa. Students will showcase their African Studies learning experiences including study abroad in an African country, research, and internships. The presentations provides a great opportunity also for ASP to evaluate the certificate program to see if students demonstrate achievement of enhanced knowledge of the cultures, history, politics, economics, and/or literature and arts in African Studies from an interdisciplinary perspective.

This year, a total of 27 students will be receiving the certificate in African Studies. They will be presenting on their individual areas of academic and professional interests. We look forward to the opportunity to hear from graduating students as they present on their experiences.

3:30 pm Cultural Event
Artist in Residence Showcase
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Showcase featuring music, films, artwork, and literature created in collaboration with the Astrophysics and Cosmology Department at Pitt.
Elizabeth Brown will perform a new work by Devon Osumu Tippled for shakuhachi and fixed media

8:00 pm Cultural Event
Gamelan: Traditional and Modern Music of Indonesia
Location:
Bellefield Hall Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of Music
See Details

University of Pittsburgh Gamelan performs Sudanese Gamelan Degung and the PA premiere of Elizabeth Brown's "Cloudrest" for gamelan and shakuhachi. Shakuhachi will be performed by Devon Osamu Tipp.

Saturday, April 13

12:00 pm Festival
The 39th Latin American & Caribbean Festival
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall, galleria and patio
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies and Director's Office
See Details

PITTSBURGH—The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Pittsburgh’s University Center for International Studies will be hosting the 39th Annual Latin American and Caribbean Festival from noon to 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, 2019 in the Galleria, and Patio of Wesley W. Posvar Hall, 230 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213.

Beginning at noon, the festival will feature Latin American and Caribbean food, arts, crafts, and information on local and regional organizations. Latin American vendors also will offer handmade and authentic Latin American products. Music and dance performances from Latin America and the Caribbean will take place throughout the day.

Since its inception, the festival has showcased the diversity of Latin American and Caribbean cultures by combining the resources of CLAS with people of Latin American heritage. The growth of Pittsburgh's Latin American and Latino populations has made the festival one of the largest gatherings of these communities in Western Pennsylvania.

8:00 pm Performance
Balinese Wayang Puppet Theater
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of Music
See Details

Gender Wayang Music performed by Meghan Hynson, Yang Shuo, Wangcaixuan Zhang and Annie Valdes

Pre-performance lecture by Dr. Meghan Hynson