2021 Global Health Case Competition

Friday, September 24, 2021 (All day) to Friday, November 5, 2021 (All day)
In-Person and Virtual

 

Sponsored by the Global Studies Center and the Center for Bioethics & Health Law, Pitt’s Global Health Case Competition is designed to give students simulated professional experience in developing strategies to address a real-world global health issue. 

Interdisciplinary teams of graduate and undergraduate students will develop a plan to address the scenario in a holistic way. Each team will present its strategy to a panel of experts, with the top team receiving cash prizes and support to participate in the 2022 Emory Morningside Global Health Case Competition. The case competition is sponsored by the Graduate School of Public Health’s Center for Global Studies and Global Health Student Association and Pitt’s Global Studies Center. 

Last year Pitt’s winning team went on to place 3rd out of 53 teams at Emory University’s global competition.  View the 2021 first and second place presentations at Pitt’s competition here.


Students must agree to attend all of the following events (this is a tentative schedule):

September 24, 1PM – 3 PM:

Opening Session with Key-Note Address, Case reveal, and Team Assignments

Session will take place in Public Health Building Room G23


October 1, 2 PM – 4 PM:

How to effectively compile and present your case (virtual)


October 15, 2PM– 4 PM:

Presentation on specific case-relevant content (virtual)


October 22, 2 PM – 4 PM:

Presentation on equity and policy implications (virtual)


October 29:

Free Day


November 5, 2 PM – 6 PM:

Case presentations

Session will take place in 1500 Posvar Hall.

 

Register Here by September 22, 2021.

Questions? Contact Elaine Linn eel58@pitt.edu

 

Watch Global Health Case Competition Student Presentations

The competition is open to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students from all areas of study. Post-graduate and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible to participate. Teams will be composed of four to six students from three or more disciplines. There are three options for registration:

  • A student may register individually and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Two or three students may register as a partial team and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Four to six students may register as a full team. Full teams must represent at least different three disciplines or schools and are highly encouraged to include members from a broad array of academic disciplines.  

 

Schedule (Tentative)

 

September 24, 2021 1PM – 3 PM:
Opening Session with Key-Note address, case reveal, and team assignments 

Session will take place in Public Health Building Room G23

 
October 1, 2 PM – 4 PM:
How to effectively compile and present your case (virtual)
 
October 15, 2PM– 4 PM:
Free Day
 
October 22, 2 PM – 4 PM:
Presentation on equity and policy implications (virtual)
 
October 29:
Presentation on specific case-relevant content (virtual)
 
November 5, 2 PM – 6 PM:
Case presentations 
Session will take place in 1500 Posvar Hall.

Sponsored by: University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies Center and Center for Bioethics & Health Law

University of Pittsburgh Global Studies Center
Elaine Linn
eel58@pitt.edu
Elaine Linn is experienced in helping students articulate and pursue their personal and academic interests and plan their career path, having served as the Global Studies Center advisor since 2006. She is also the Executive Director of the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS). She has led three Fulbright Hays groups of educators to Egypt (2) and Jordan and served two terms as the president of the PA Council of International Education. She is the advisor to Pitt’s Muslim Student Association and the Multiracial Student Association. Elaine has an MA from Graduate School Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, and a BA Political Science, Drake University. In her free time, Elaine is active in the community through affiliations with social justice organizations and the Islamic Center of Pittsburgh, enjoying her family and the great outdoors.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who can participate?
The competition is open to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students from all areas of study. Post-graduate and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible to participate. Teams will be composed of four to six students from three or more disciplines. There are three options for registration:

  • A student may register individually and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Two or three students may register as a partial team and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Four to six students may register as a full team. Full teams must represent at least different three disciplines or schools and are highly encouraged to include members from a broad array of academic disciplines.  

How are teams created? 
Those who register  individually or in small groups will be assigned additional team members. Teams are assigned to ensure graduate/undergraduate mix and at least three schools/departments are represented
Each team must assign a captain

What is the case?
The case is a 10 – 20-page document that presents a real-world global health challenge
Teams analyze the case, conduct research and create and present a proposed strategy to address the challenge 

Case studies from previous Emory University Global Health Competitions can be found at https://globalhealth.emory.edu/students/case-competitions/archives.html

How much time must a student commit?

Once the case is released, each team will decide how much time it spends working on its strategy and presentation. In addition to attendance at mandatory weekly events in October, the week of the competition, successful teams have found that spending an additional 10-20 hours working together on their project yields optimal results.

How does the competition work?
On November 5 each team gives a 15-minute oral presentation with supporting slides before a panel of experts. There will be five minutes of Q&A immediately after the presentation.  The final slide must cite all sources consulted. Along with their Powerpoint, teams will submit a one-page budget brief (normal margins, 12 pt. font) in WORD to the competition coordinator by 12 Noon on November 5, 2021. Any team that modifies their slides for the presentation, after the 12 PM deadline will be disqualified. 

How do students benefit from the competition experience?
Students will gain valuable experience developing a comprehensive strategy and competing in a world-recognized format to address of Global health challenge.  

They will:

“Develop skills as a researcher, team member and a presenter”
“Learn how to listen to others, synthesize information and find solutions”
“Gain insight on the complexity of budgeting and evaluation”