2021 Global Health Case Competition

In-Person and Virtual

2021 Global Health Case Competition

Pitt’s Global Health Case Competition is designed to give students simulated professional experience in developing strategies to address a real-world global health issue. 

Interdisciplinary teams of graduate and undergraduate students will develop a plan to address the scenario in a holistic way. Each team will present its strategy to a panel of experts, with the top team receiving cash prizes and support to participate in the 2022 Emory Morningside Global Health Case Competition. The case competition is sponsored by the Graduate School of Public Health’s Center for Global Studies, Global Health Student Association, the Center for Bioethics & Health Law, and Pitt’s Global Studies Center. 

Last year Pitt’s winning team went on to place 3rd out of 53 teams at Emory University’s global competition.  View the 2021 first and second place presentations at Pitt’s competition here.


Students must agree to attend all of the following events (this is a tentative schedule):

September 24, 1PM – 3 PM:

Opening Session with Key-Note Address, Case reveal, and Team Assignments

Session will take place in Public Health Building Room G23


October 1, 2 PM – 4 PM:

How to effectively compile and present your case (virtual)


October 15, 2PM– 4 PM:

Presentation on specific case-relevant content (virtual)


October 22, 2 PM – 4 PM:

Presentation on equity and policy implications (virtual)


October 29:

Free Day


November 5, 2 PM – 6 PM:

Case presentations

Session will take place in 1500 Posvar Hall.

 

Registration Closed.

Questions? Contact Elaine Linn eel58@pitt.edu

 

Watch Global Health Case Competition Student Presentations

The 2021 Health Case Competition is closed to registration.

Elizabeth
Van Nostrand, JD
Temple University
Elizabeth Van Nostrand is an associate professor of Health Services Administration and Policy at Temple University. Prior to Temple, Elizabeth Van Nostrand, JD served as the Director and Principal Investigator for the Mid-Atlantic Regional Public Health Training Center. She also was an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the Director of the MPH and the JD/MPH programs. At Pitt, she taught Public Health Law and Ethics at Pitt Public Health and the University of Pittsburgh's School of Law, along with Health Law in the Executive MBA Program at the Katz School of Business. Her current areas of research interest include the opioid crisis and emergency preparedness.
Dr. Cynthia
Salter, PHD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
Cynthia L. Salter, PhD, MPH, is a public health professional focusing on community-based initiatives and maternal health. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health's Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences. She currently serves as the Interim Director of the University of Pittsburgh Center for Global Health. She has been an affiliated faculty member with Pitt’s Center for Global Studies since 2015, teaching Introduction to Global Health and Special Topics in Global Health. From 2010 to 2013, Salter was director of Pittsburgh’s Birth Circle Community-Based Doula Program, a grassroots non-profit working to improve maternal outcomes among underserved mothers in the Pittsburgh area. She served as principal investigator when the program was awarded one of six national grants from the Health Resources and Services Administration to develop community-based doula services. In 2018, Salter had the opportunity to combine travel with her Global Health teaching, leading 13 University of Pittsburgh undergraduates on a semester-long PittMAP focused on Global Health in Shanghai, China, Sydney, Australia, and Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Bethany
Flage
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
Bethany Flage is a PhD candidate in the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health with an interest in how hemoglobin type influences transmission stages of Plasmodium falciparum.
Dr. Donald
Burke
Competition Judge
Dr. Donald S. Burke served as dean of the Graduate School of Public Health and associate vice chancellor for global health at the University of Pittsburgh from 2006 through June 2019, making him the longest-serving dean in school history. He is also the first occupant of the Jonas Salk Chair in Population Health and a distinguished university professor of health science and policy. Throughout his professional life, Burke has studied prevention and control of infectious diseases of global concern, including HIV/AIDS, influenza, dengue, and emerging infectious diseases. He has lived six years in Thailand, worked extensively in Cameroon, and conducted field epidemiology and vaccine studies in numerous other developing countries. He has approached epidemic control using strategies “from the bench to the bush.” He has authored or co-authored over 300 peer-reviewed academic publications.
Dr. Manuel
Roman-Lacayo
University of Pittsburgh Center for Latin American Studies
Manuel Roman-Lacayo is the Associate Director of the Center for Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh. Upon graduating from Harvard University, he was the recipient of a Fulbright Research Fellowship and was later appointed director of the National Museum of Nicaragua. Later, he earned a CLAS certificate and PhD in Anthropology as a Heinz Fellow in Latin American Archaeology here at the University of Pittsburgh. After leaving Pittsburgh in 2006, he served as country program manager and as the monitoring and evaluation manager for USAID Public Private Partnerships in Nicaragua and Guatemala, while also working at the Universidad Americana in Managua, where he founded and coordinated the master’s program in Latin American Studies.
Dr. Mohamed
B. Hagahmed
University of Pittsburgh Department of Emergency Medicine
Dr. Mohamed B Hagahmed is an Emergency Medicine Specialist in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He graduated in 2009 with a BS in Emergency Medicine, and an MD with honors from Drexel University in 2015. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and an affiliate with many hospitals including St. Clair Hospital and University of Pittsburgh Medical System.
Dr. Frioz
Amdoel Wahid
Graduate School of Public Health Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
Firoz Abdoel Wahid is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at the EOH Department of the Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh. He is a native from Suriname, where he graduated as a family physician in 2005, and with a Master’s in Public Health in 2012. He has over 15 years of experience in public health, the last eight of which in environmental health. His public health career started in 2005 as the clinical coordinator of the National AIDS Program in Suriname. He pursued his doctorate in environmental health in 2018 at Tulane University, New Orleans. Dr. Abdoel Wahid is part of the Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health that is focused on the impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on birth outcomes. At the EOH department of the University of Pittsburgh, he will play a key role in developing global environmental health research and research training and teaching in food safety, pesticide-induced adverse maternal and child health outcomes, and climate and health impact on vulnerable populations.
Dr. Abi
Fapohunda
University of Pittsburgh Department of Africana Studies
Dr. Fapohunda has been teaching since 2008 in the Department of Africana Studies. She was a visiting assistant professor of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences (2010-2012) at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Over the past 10 years, she has conducted several studies among African Americans, Africans in the Diaspora, and on the African Continent. The focus of her research is “Healthy Community for Black Immigrants” in Allegheny County, PA. She has trained healthcare practitioners on cancer awareness, screening, early diagnoses and treatment in Nigeria. She is an epidemiologist and health educator with over 20 years’ experience of running her own consulting company in public health, conducting needs assessments and program evaluations on the effectiveness of numerous community-based initiatives related to health disparities in both behavioral and physical health, including nutrition, smoking cessation, HIV/AIDS, and oral health in Black communities.
Helena
VonVille
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School for Public Health
Helena Vonville currently resides as a research and instruction librarian for the Graduate School for Public Health. Vonville obtained her M.L.S. in academic public services from Rutgers University in 1989 and her M.P.H. in management, policy, and community health. She has previously served as library director at the University of Texas School of Public Health and as a consultant internet liaison officer at Amigos Library Services. Her areas of interest include evidence-based practice within the field of public health and professional training.
Tina Batra
Hershey, JD, MPH
Graduate School of Public Health Department of Health Policy and Management
Tina Batra Hershey, JD, MPH, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and an Affiliated Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where she teaches courses on health care fraud, abuse, and compliance; health law and ethics; and health policy and management in public health. She is also the Co-Director of the Multidisciplinary Master of Public Health program. At Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College, she is an adjunct instructor of Health Law. Her current and recent projects include enhancing tribal legal preparedness for public health emergencies through the Tribal Legal Preparedness Project; co-authoring public health emergency law manuals and bench books for the District of Columbia and Louisiana; and using legal epidemiology to examine the impact of laws and policies related to infectious disease outbreaks and natural disasters
Emily
Crisan
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
Emily Crisan is a M.P.H. graduate student with a concentration in Global Health. She graduated from Duquesne University School of Nursing in 2019 with a B.S. in nursing. She has experience as a research assistant and registered nurse at UPMC. Her current interests include adolescent health, improvement in healthcare and health education, and global health within Spanish-speaking populations.

REGISTRATION CLOSED

The competition is open to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students from all areas of study. Post-graduate and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible to participate. Teams will be composed of four to six students from three or more disciplines. There are three options for registration:

  • A student may register individually and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Two or three students may register as a partial team and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Four to six students may register as a full team. Full teams must represent at least different three disciplines or schools and are highly encouraged to include members from a broad array of academic disciplines.  

 

Schedule 

September 24, 2021 1PM – 3 PM:
Opening Session with Key-Note address, case reveal, and team assignments 

Session will take place in Public Health Building Room G23

 
October 1, 2 PM – 4 PM:
How to effectively compile and present your case (virtual)
 
October 15, 2PM– 4 PM:
Free Day
 
October 22, 2 PM – 4 PM:
Presentation on equity and policy implications (virtual)
 
October 29:
Presentation on specific case-relevant content (virtual)
 
November 5, 2 PM – 6 PM:
Case presentations 
Session will take place in 1500 Posvar Hall.

Sponsored by: University of Pittsburgh's Center for Bioethics & Health LawGraduate School of Public Health’s Center for Global Studies, the Global Health Student Association, and Pitt’s Global Studies Center.

University of Pittsburgh Global Studies Center
Elaine Linn
eel58@pitt.edu
Elaine Linn is experienced in helping students articulate and pursue their personal and academic interests and plan their career path, having served as the Global Studies Center advisor since 2006. She is also the Executive Director of the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS). She has led three Fulbright Hays groups of educators to Egypt (2) and Jordan and served two terms as the president of the PA Council of International Education. She is the advisor to Pitt’s Muslim Student Association and the Multiracial Student Association. Elaine has an MA from Graduate School Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, and a BA Political Science, Drake University. In her free time, Elaine is active in the community through affiliations with social justice organizations and the Islamic Center of Pittsburgh, enjoying her family and the great outdoors.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who can participate?
The competition is open to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students from all areas of study. Post-graduate and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible to participate. Teams will be composed of four to six students from three or more disciplines. There are three options for registration:

  • A student may register individually and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Two or three students may register as a partial team and will be assigned teammates from other academic disciplines to form a full team.
  • Four to six students may register as a full team. Full teams must represent at least different three disciplines or schools and are highly encouraged to include members from a broad array of academic disciplines.  

How are teams created? 
Those who register  individually or in small groups will be assigned additional team members. Teams are assigned to ensure graduate/undergraduate mix and at least three schools/departments are represented
Each team must assign a captain

What is the case?
The case is a 10 – 20-page document that presents a real-world global health challenge
Teams analyze the case, conduct research and create and present a proposed strategy to address the challenge 

Case studies from previous Emory University Global Health Competitions can be found at https://globalhealth.emory.edu/students/case-competitions/archives.html

How much time must a student commit?

Once the case is released, each team will decide how much time it spends working on its strategy and presentation. In addition to attendance at mandatory weekly events in October, the week of the competition, successful teams have found that spending an additional 10-20 hours working together on their project yields optimal results.

How does the competition work?
On November 5 each team gives a 15-minute oral presentation with supporting slides before a panel of experts. There will be five minutes of Q&A immediately after the presentation.  The final slide must cite all sources consulted. Along with their Powerpoint, teams will submit a one-page budget brief (normal margins, 12 pt. font) in WORD to the competition coordinator by 12 Noon on November 5, 2021. Any team that modifies their slides for the presentation, after the 12 PM deadline will be disqualified. 

How do students benefit from the competition experience?
Students will gain valuable experience developing a comprehensive strategy and competing in a world-recognized format to address of Global health challenge.  

They will:

“Develop skills as a researcher, team member and a presenter”
“Learn how to listen to others, synthesize information and find solutions”
“Gain insight on the complexity of budgeting and evaluation”