Human Rights City Alliance

Volunteering opportunities: 
Yes

 

https://www.ushrnetwork.org/resources-media/pittsburgh-human-rights-city...

Organizers and activists in Pittsburgh are working to bring diverse groups together to support each other in raising consciousness and changing policies to make Pittsburgh a model human rights city. We invite your group to join us to envision what it means to be a "human rights city" and to build our collective power to realize that vision. Together, we will press Mayor Peduto and his administration to make good on the promises he and others on the City Council made in 2011 to make Pittsburgh a Human Rights City (Click here to see the Proclamation). Allegheny County recently passed a Human Rights County measure, and we will work to make sure this is implemented in policies throughout the region. This will require residents' involvement to monitor human rights practices and to press for changes where they are needed.
We are not seeking to build yet another human rights-oriented group in Pittsburgh. Rather, we want to help unite residents in support of the human rights work happening around our city and region and to build connections with national and global human rights movements.

 

The Human Rights City initiative recognizes that leadership for positive social change will not start in our national capitals; it will only come from the people. We cannot wait for changes in national policy, but we need to become a living example to show that a society based on human rights is possible. A key lesson from history is that any work to lift up a community requires popular struggle and conscious attention to the particular needs of historically oppressed and marginalized groups. This includes people of color, Indigenous peoples, women, LGBTQIA people, immigrants, people with disabilities, youth, older adults, and future generations.

As public servants in our Human Rights City, elected officials are required to see that the policies they support and enact help reduce inequalities in our community and that they do not impose new harms on vulnerable groups. The Human Rights City Alliance is committed to working with elected officials and community leaders and residents to develop and implement new policies and practices that will help us be a city where there truly is dignity and justice for all of us.

n April of 2011 the City of Pittsburgh became the 5th Human Rights City in the United States. In doing so, it promised to “provide leadership and advocacy to secure, protect, and promote human rights for all people” and to be “a model for communities in the United States and around the world.” This Action Plan draws from work of local activists to identify proposals for change that will help us achieve these commitments. It is intended to be a dynamic, evolving document that can guide our actions and support community cooperation that will make ours a city where there is dignity and justice for everyone.

The Human Rights City initiative recognizes that leadership for positive social change will not start in our national capitals; it will only come from the people. We cannot wait for changes in national policy, but we need to become a living example to show that a society based on human rights is possible. A key lesson from history is that any work to lift up a community requires popular struggle and conscious attention to the particular needs of historically oppressed and marginalized groups. This includes people of color, Indigenous peoples, women, LGBTQIA people, immigrants, people with disabilities, youth, older adults, and future generations.

n April of 2011 the City of Pittsburgh became the 5th Human Rights City in the United States. In doing so, it promised to “provide leadership and advocacy to secure, protect, and promote human rights for all people” and to be “a model for communities in the United States and around the world.” This Action Plan draws from work of local activists to identify proposals for change that will help us achieve these commitments. It is intended to be a dynamic, evolving document that can guide our actions and support community cooperation that will make ours a city where there is dignity and justice for everyone.

The Human Rights City initiative recognizes that leadership for positive social change will not start in our national capitals; it will only come from the people. We cannot wait for changes in national policy, but we need to become a living example to show that a society based on human rights is possible. A key lesson from history is that any work to lift up a community requires popular struggle and conscious attention to the particular needs of historically oppressed and marginalized groups. This includes people of color, Indigenous peoples, women, LGBTQIA people, immigrants, people with disabilities, youth, older adults, and future generations.

As public servants in our Human Rights City, elected officials are required to see that t

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