Events in UCIS

Thursday, April 15

9:25 am Lecture
The Alternative for Germany (AfD) in a European context
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of German, Department of History and DAAD German Academic Exchange Service
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For the first time after World War II, a radical right party is represented in the German federal parliament. In this regard, the Federal Republic has finally ‘caught up’ with other European countries who have witnessed the ongoing success of radical right pariahs. The presentation will analyze the ideology of the AfD in this context and reflect on the causes and consequences of its electoral success.

Marcel Lewandowsky is a DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor at the Center for European Studies, University of Florida.

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
CoE: Creating Europe Through Creative Europe
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
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The ESC’s 2020-21 theme, Creating Europe, explores both the political, social, cultural, and geographical forces that have given shape to contemporary Europe and also individuals who create and are creative in their daily or artistic expressions of what it means to be European.

Audience participation is encouraged.

Event information will be updated to include panelists and moderator.

3:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
JMintheUS: The Formation and Institutionalization of New Parties in EU Member States
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with University of Washington
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EU DEMOCRACY FORUM – IMAGINE THE FUTURE
Democracy cannot be taken for granted -- not in Europe, not anywhere. With this series of talks by experts on European politics and society we want to encourage discussion about the future of democracy in the European Union, its member states, and the neighborhood. As the EU Commission launches its Conference on the Future of Europe in 2021, we invite you to imagine this future with us. Our contributors will reflect on the EU’s achievements and challenges. We will hear their reflections on how to strengthen and expand democratic processes and institutions, both in Brussels and in Europe more broadly.

3:15 pm Cultural Event
Laber Rhabarber - German Conversation Hour
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Department of German
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Laber Rhabarber - More than a German conversation hour!

"... the most human thing we have is language, and we have it in order to talk." German author Theodor Fontane wrote in 1892. So, here's chance! Be human with us for an hour every week, albeit in German ;D

Everyone and every level of German welcome!

Zoom Meeting link: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/99661883076
German Dept. website: http://www.german.pitt.edu/
Follow us on Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @UPittGerman

4:00 pm Panel Discussion
Moving Forward: Human Milk Science and the Wisdom of the Brazilian Model
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies, Center for Latin American Studies and Nationality Rooms and Intercultural Exchange Programs
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Join the Nationality Rooms Program and Mid-Atlantic Mother's Milk Bank for a series of panel discussions on the health and cultural aspects of Human Milk. Also sponsored by CLAS, African Studies, the School of Health and Rehab Sciences, UPMC, the Latino Community Center, and the Bhutanese Community Association of Pittsburgh.

Register Here: https://pitt.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMsc-GoqzovGdfCpUmYkgU6dlM_nIBVAcOC

4:00 pm Lecture
Japanese CALL: A Review, a Critique, and Suggestions for Future Directions
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
See Details

In the last decade, technological advancements have enabled a boom in the use of computer assisted language learning (CALL) for Japanese language learning. Recent research (Zimmerman and McMeekin, 2019) shows how new directions are breaking ground, moving beyond the drill-based behaviorist/structural approach of previous decades into areas of inquiry that focus on more integrative and even ecological approaches to technology use. This talk reviews major findings on the effects of CALL on learning, teaching, and acquisition of the Japanese language, identifies gaps in the research and discusses specific observations/suggestions for the direction of future Japanese CALL research.